Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have developed a program in c# which is doing "Insertion Sort", the code takes in a max value for the elements and the values of the elements and then one by one shows the steps of sorted values.

Code:

    static void insertionSort(int[] ar)
    {
        for (int i = 1; i < ar.Length; i++)
        {
            int temp = ar[i];
            int j = i - 1;

            while (j >= 0 && ar[j] > temp)
            {
                ar[j + 1] = ar[j];

                foreach (int val in ar)
                    Console.Write(val + " ");
                Console.WriteLine();

                j--;
            }
        }


    }

    static void Main(String[] args)
    {

        int ar_size;
        ar_size = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        int[] ar = new int[ar_size];
        for (int i = 0; i < ar_size; i++)
        {
            ar[i] = Convert.ToInt32(Console.Read());
        }

        insertionSort(ar);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

The Sample Input That I Give:

5
2 4 6 8 3

The Output That Comes: enter image description here

Can anyone explain me why is this happening!

Any help would be greatly appreciated! :)

share|improve this question
    
Unless I'm being really dumb this afternoon your insertionSort method is just going to write over things rather than sort them as when the value in one index is higher than the value in the next you don't swap them, you just overwrite the lower value. –  Kobunite Feb 18 '13 at 14:56
    
how can this can be implemented? @Kobunite –  Mohammad Areeb Siddiqui Feb 18 '13 at 14:57
    
1  
Your while loop is 'making room' but you never copy temp to its final place. –  Henk Holterman Feb 18 '13 at 14:59
1  
Hint: test it with int[] ar = { 4, 6, 1, 9, 7 }; instead of ReadLine() –  Henk Holterman Feb 18 '13 at 15:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Apart from the problems with your sort itself, the reason for the strange numbers in your result is that you use Console.Read very wrong. It returns the ASCII value of the character entered by the user. Furthermore, it will return the ASCII values for all entered characters, not only for the numbers.

So, the first call to Console.Read() will return 50 (ASCII value of '2').
The second call will return 32 (ASCII value of a space).
The third call will return 52 (ASCII value of '4').
etc.

To fix this, initialize ar like this:

var numbers = Console.ReadLine().Split(' ');
for (int i = 0; i < ar_size; i++)
    ar[i] = Convert.ToInt32(numbers[i]);

Please note that this code lacks error handling. It will throw an exception in the followin circumstances:

  1. The user entered anything besides spaces and numbers
  2. The user entered less numbers than he specified in the first line
share|improve this answer
    
so then what should i do? –  Mohammad Areeb Siddiqui Feb 18 '13 at 15:04
    
@AreebSiddiqui: My answer contains code that fixes this particular problem. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 18 '13 at 15:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.