Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been reading a bit about lambda expressions on the internet recently and it seems to me that C++0x's lambda expressions will not have a single type (or types) that will bind exclusively to lambda expressions -- in other words, lambda expressions will only match template arguments or auto arguments/variables. What happens, as described here, is that

Compilers that support lambdas will create a unique anonymous functor type for each lambda expression

My question is, is that a bad thing? Wouldn't it make sense to have some keyword that matches only to lambda expressions, e.g. lambda, which would work as follows

void f(std::function<int(int)> func)
{
     func(2);
}

template<typename T>
void g(T func)
{
     func(2);
}

void h(lambda func)
{
     func(2);
}

int main()
{
    int fpointer(int);
    struct { int operator()(int var) { return var; } } functor;

    f(fpointer); //ok (actually a linker error, but for the sake of example)
    f(functor); //ok
    f([](int var) { return var; }); //ok

    g(fpointer); //ok
    g(functor); //ok
    g([](int var) { return var; }); //ok

    h(fpointer); //error -- function pointer isn't a lambda expr
    h(functor); //error -- functor isn't a lambda expr
    h([](int var) { return var; }); //ok

    return 0;
}

To be honest, I actually can't see the usefulness of this (especially given that auto accepts lambda expressions, so one could then assign a lambda to a variable), but it still doesn't sit right with me that lambda expressions are anonymous types and cannot be bound specifically to just one particular type (to the exclusion of all others).

In essence, my question is, is it fine that lambda expressions are anonymous (both in terms of utility -- does the lack of a lambda type devoid us of some functionality -- and philosophically -- does it really make sense that lambda expressions always have the 'type' auto)?

share|improve this question
6  
It slightly sounds like you are not aware that you can accept lambda expressions using std::function<int(int)> too. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 29 '09 at 18:35
    
I was, however since the general functionality matches how auto works (afaik), I thought it unnecessary to add another set of example functions/function calls (but it's still good to mention, so thanks litb) –  GRB Sep 29 '09 at 18:37
2  
I think there's a misunderstanding about auto. auto can't be used as a parameter type in a function. It's not a type. auto just says "deduce the type from the initializer because I'm too lazy or just unable to name the type". –  sellibitze Sep 29 '09 at 18:39
    
I've changed the auto parameter in that case. I am still confident that you can do auto = [](int a) { ... }; however (...right? ;) ) –  GRB Sep 29 '09 at 18:43
    
the whole purpose of op() was that you don't have to worry about the functor type. now if you restrict something to only lambdas (surely i think implementations will provide some __is_lambda metafunction or something you could use with enable_if), what sense would it make to get rid of the ability to acccept function pointers etc. I don't see any and i believe there is no sense in it. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 29 '09 at 18:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Lambdas are independent types. The code

void h(lambda func)
{
     func(2);
}

doesn't make any sense because lambdas don't have runtime polymorphism. Recall that a lambda is the equivalent of

struct unique_name
{
    return_type operator()(Arg1 a1, Arg2 a2, ... , Argn an)
    {
        code_inside_lambda;
    }
}

Which is itself a unique type. The code above would be the same as saying

void h(class C)
{
     C(2);
}

Which also makes no sense even if we assure that C has operator(). You need a template:

template<typename T>
void g(T func)
{
     func(2);
}

int main()
{
    g([](int x){return x + 2;});
}
share|improve this answer
    
You make a good point about the idea of having void h(class C), however I can do void h(functor_name C) which will only match parameters of that particular functor type. I can't do the same with a lambda expression. –  GRB Sep 29 '09 at 18:31
1  
If you need to refer to a particular lambda by name, you should instead define it the old way using a struct. A lambda expression is, by definition, anonymous. –  rlbond Sep 29 '09 at 18:45
    
That's a good point, if you need to specialize to lambda expressions (even though it'd provide no functionality) you're probably using them incorrectly anyway (and would be going against the theory of lambda epxressions). Plus, as I mentioned and as everyone else has mentioned, there would just probably be no utility to it (though litb's right that someone will add a nonstandard compiler extension for it anyway). I've accepted this answer –  GRB Sep 29 '09 at 19:11

I see no reason to differentiate function types based on whether the function has a name or not. Lambda functions are just a shorthand, allowing you to define a convenience function easily. Name or no name, the behaviour of the function when called is the same.

Think of it this way. An early version of your software has a predicate defined as an anonymous function. Over time, requirements get more complex, and your predicate gets more complex too - and maybe you need to call it from more than one place. The sensible thing to do is to refactor so that you have a named function.

There's no reason why the called function (the one that calls the predicate) should care about that. Simple or complex, named or anonymous - it's still just a predicate function.

One minor issue is that of closures - I haven't checked, but with a bit of luck, C++ will get nested named functions with closures as well as lambdas.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.