Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a multithreaded server which processes requests and adds/removes from multiple queues. This server provides an API for rest calls. My design is the following (in pseudocode):

postRequest(queueName)
{
   lockmutex
   if(exist?(queueName))
      //process request add data to queue
   else
     //create queue and process request
   unlockmutex
}

getRequest(queueName)
{
   lockmutex
   if(exist?(queueName))
      //process request to queue
   else
     //create queue and process request
   unlockmutex
}

deleteRequest(queueName)
{
   lockmutex
   if(exist?(queueName))
      //process request 
   else
     //create queue and process request
   unlockmutex
}

My problem is that I lock the mutex pretty much for most of the code, so the multithreading doesn't really make it that much faster. Is there any other way to synchonize multiple threads on adding/removing from a queue, keep in mind that I have to process rest calls from users so there is no way to predict how data will be added/removed from these queues.

share|improve this question
2  
Lock mutex, take request, unlock mutex, process request. –  James McLaughlin Feb 18 '13 at 16:58
    
so if I understand you correctly, I should lock the mutex before I call the request functions. Does that improve the performace at all? –  marcwho Feb 18 '13 at 17:00
1  
First, I'd simplify the code: create the queues ahead of time (probably before starting up secondary threads) so the rest of the code can just take their existence for granted. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 18 '13 at 17:00
    
@marcwho You shouldn't process the request while the mutex is locked. I'm assuming processing is the time-consuming part. –  James McLaughlin Feb 18 '13 at 17:02
1  
The other thing you generally want to do is have your queue hold pointers to data rather than copying the data itself to the queue. By storing a pointer, a push or pop will typically only take a couple of instructions or so, minimizing the time it spends locked. Depending on what you have available, you may be able to turn that into an atomic operation so you no longer need a lock at all. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 18 '13 at 17:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.