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I am using the WCF Data Services 5.2 to query a db via OData. I will describe my problem bellow, i think can solve it by implementing my own function for filtering data, similar to any/all, but if you have a better solution please feel free to share it.

As a model I have a table containing employees, a table containing all the possible skills(Qualifications) and a mapping table (EQs) for the many-to-many relationship between employees and skills. Until here everything is easy but the skills table actually represents a tree of skills; for example the skill "Coding" has ".Net" and Java as children, while .Net has WCF and ASP.NET as children and Java has JSF and Struts as children. The Skills tree is modeled in the skills table with a column called "QParentID"(each skill has a single direct parent).

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It can happen that an employee only has a relation to WCF or ASP.NET as skills, but when i search for the employees with the skills ".NET" I should get these employees as well, along with the ones that have a direct link to .NET. For example John has WCF and ASP.NET as skills (no direct link to .NET skill) but when I search for employees with the skill .NET John should also be in the results. Practically I need to search recursively trough the skills and all of their parents.

I was thinking to implement a function that would work similar to "any/all".Something like this \webservice\Employees?&filter=matches(<id>) instead of \webservice\Employees/?$filter=EQs/any(e: e/Qualification_ID eq <id>)

which will recursively check if the skills or its parent(and parents of the parent) match the id.

Again if you have a better solution than this, please feel free to share.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Lori

EDIT:I've added a non optimized first draft of the recursive function i would like to implement and use with odata

public static bool Matches(IEnumerable<EQ> source,
int id)
    {
        if (source == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        }
        EFEntities entities = new EFEntities();
        foreach (EQ item in source)
        {
            if (item.Qualification_ID == id || CheckParent(entities.Qualifications.Where(q=>q.ID_Qualification == id).First(),id))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    private static bool CheckParent(Qualification qualification, int id)
    {
        EFEntities entities = new EFEntities();
        if (qualification.ID_Qualification == id) {
            return true;
        }
        if (qualification.QParent_ID != 0) {
            if (CheckParent(entities.Qualifications.Where(q => q.ID_Qualification == qualification.ID_Qualification).First(), id)) {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;

    }

I copied the signature of the method from the implementation of "any" method, but instead of a Predicate I use the qualification id as a param. I would like to be able to call this as follows /webservice/Employees?&filter=EQs/matches(). Is that somehow possbile?

share|improve this question
    
I think we can only answer this if you show how you'd implement filter=matches(<id>). –  Gert Arnold Feb 18 '13 at 19:49
    
I don't know exactly how the any/all function is implemented, but I've read somewhere that they return true or false according to the expression in the paranthesis. Id like to implement a "matches" function that takes an id as a parameter (String or int) and returns a boolean. The actual implementation will be a simple recursive algorithm, while the current EQ's Qualification_ID is not equal with the parameter ID and the EQ has a QParent_ID it will check if the EQ of the parent matches the id. Thanks. –  Lori Feb 18 '13 at 20:45
    
I'm just trying to implement such an algorithm, it's not as easy as I thought. I'll come back with a working implementation. –  Lori Feb 18 '13 at 21:41
    
I've just edited the initial question with a first version of the recursive method. I don't know if it really works, I did not have time to test it, but the function will do something like that. P.S. don't judge the quality of the code, I'm new to c# and I really did it in a hurry. –  Lori Feb 19 '13 at 16:22
    
I think this is pretty OK. Recursive querying with linq is never really elegant, because the language doesn't have any dedicated constructs for it. It will always entails some recursive function like you r CheckParent. –  Gert Arnold Feb 19 '13 at 16:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I answered this over on MSDN for you, but I'm copying the answer over here too for visibility.

The OData V3 protocol specifies a way to declare custom functions in metadata that may then be used not just in the path part of a URI, but in other expressions like $filter. This is exactly what you are looking for. http://www.odata.org/media/30002/OData.html#functions

However, WCF Data Services Server does not support functions at this time, so there is no easy path to allow what you want. ASP.NET Web API doesn't have support for this right now either (I believe). I'm not sure about a timeline for supporting custom functions for either WCF DS or Web API, but it is something we'd very much like to implement.

Note however that if your scenario is simple enough, then legacy "Service Operations", which have been around since OData V1, may be used. The exact example you give above is achievable in WCF DS by doing:

GET service\MyServiceOperationForEmployees('someStringPatternThatIWillDoSomethingFancyWith')

See http://www.odata.org/media/30002/OData.html#operations and any other related article about service operations on WCF Data Services for more examples. This is not exactly what you want and is deprecated from a protocol point of view, but I'd recommend trying this until full function support is ready.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any update on this? I'm trying to use a nested where clause and I think it is exactly the purpose of the All operator from what I've read. –  julealgon Nov 12 '13 at 21:24

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