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# Lists.
months = [6, 2, 2, 5, 0, 3, 5, 1, 4, 6, 2, 4]
weekdays = ["Sunday", "Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday", "Thursday", "Friday", "Saturday"]

# Functions for algorithm.
def yearcode(y):
    """generate year-code using algorithm"""
    y = y % 100
    y = y + (y / 4) % 7
    return round(y)

def monthcode(m):
    """get month number from month-list"""
    return months[monthin - 1]

def daycode(d):
    """simplify day number for efficiency"""
    return d % 7

# Inputs.
dayayin = int(input("What Day in the Month?"))
monthin = int(input("What Month? E.g.- January is 1"))
yearin = int(input("What Year?"))

# Define variables for functions.
yearout = yearcode(yearin)
monthout = monthcode(monthin)
dayout = daycode(dayin)

# Final Add-Up and Output.
result = (dayout + monthout + yearout) % 7
print(weekdays[result])

The Error is: "ParseError: bad input on line 17" The purpose of this program is to give the day of the week for any date. As you can see it is not happy with how I have given the purpose of the function for my benefit. I really feel like I am missing something here.

Here is the Improved and Working Version (Thanks for the help!)

# Lists.
months = [6, 2, 2, 5, 0, 3, 5, 1, 4, 6, 2, 4]
weekdays = ["Sunday", "Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday", "Thursday", "Friday",  "Saturday"]

# Fruitful Functions for Algorithm.
def yearcode(y):
    """Year Code Generator Algorithm"""
    y = y % 100
    y = y + (y / 4) % 7
    return int(round(y))

def monthcode(m):
    """Retrieve Month Number from Month List"""
    return months[m - 1]

def daycode(d):
    """Simplify Day Input for Efficiency"""
    return d % 7

# Inputs.
dayin = int(input("What Day in the Month?"))
monthin = int(input("What Month? E.g.- January is 1"))
yearin = int(input("What Year?"))

# Define Variables for Functions.
yearout = yearcode(yearin)
monthout = monthcode(monthin)
dayout = daycode(dayin)

# Final Add-Up and Output.
result = int((dayout + monthout + yearout) % 7)
print(weekdays[result])
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Wooble, Andy Hayden, Rüdiger Hanke, Bart, SqlRyan Feb 18 '13 at 21:42

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could be getting an error because of issues mixing spaces an tabs. Try to run your script with

python -t yourscript.py

and see if it tells you anything.

Perhaps, it would be easier to just use the builtin function in the calendar module.

>>> import calendar
>>> calendar.weekday(2013,2,18)
0
>>> calendar.day_name[calendar.weekday(2013,2,18)]
'Monday'

As a side note, running your code, I don't get a ParseError -- I get a NameError because dayin isn't defined. Maybe you didn't mean to name it dayayin?

share|improve this answer
    
damn, but I do get a parse error on that line. cheers for the heads-up on the typo though. –  Alex Thornton Feb 18 '13 at 17:22
    
@user2080262 -- After fixing that, there's an IndexError which crops up because you're using a non-integer (float) as your index -- There are probably other bugs too. –  mgilson Feb 18 '13 at 17:23
    
@user2080262 -- Also, try running it as python -t yourscript.py to check for mixing spaces and tabs. –  mgilson Feb 18 '13 at 17:25

You should be using "m" not "monthin" in the body of the monthcode function

share|improve this answer
    
cheers for that –  Alex Thornton Feb 18 '13 at 17:26

Some simple errors I see already:

Probably a typo using the variable dayayin instead of dayin

dayayin = int(input("What Day in the Month?"))
...
dayout = daycode(dayin)

In the function monthcode, where does mothincomes from?

def monthcode(m):
    """get month number from month-list"""
    return months[monthin - 1]

Edit: After fixing these, and making result an integer

result = int((dayout + monthout + yearout) % 7)

the script runs, but there is still some off-by one error in your code. When I enter my date of birth (19/05/1978) it returns Thursday, but I am born on a Friday.

share|improve this answer
    
already fixed them –  Alex Thornton Feb 18 '13 at 17:27
    
Also change result to int((dayout + monthout + yearout) % 7) –  BioGeek Feb 18 '13 at 17:28
    
thanks, i will tweak it. –  Alex Thornton Feb 18 '13 at 17:48
    
that might be because the rounding isn't working properly. If the answer is (in yearcode) something.5, then it needs to round up. rounding down isn't a problem, but that could be it. –  Alex Thornton Feb 18 '13 at 17:54
    
it works now! thankyou! –  Alex Thornton Feb 18 '13 at 19:16

I agree with BioGeek

the script runs, but there is still some off-by one error in your code. When I enter my date of birth (19/05/1978) it returns Thursday, but I am born on a Friday.

Your working version appears to be one day off compared to several online calculators. e.g.

What Day in the Month?19
What Month? E.g.- January is 15
What Year?1942
Monday

But other calculators show it as Tuesday.

share|improve this answer
    
it's all fixed now, works perfectly ty –  Alex Thornton Feb 19 '13 at 10:35

Have you tried deleting that line and re-entering it by hand? I've often seen people, especially Mac users, enter invisible Unicode characters (alt+space, if I remember correctly). This could be the source of your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
done it, still an error –  Alex Thornton Feb 18 '13 at 17:26

Googeling for the list [6, 2, 2, 5, 0, 3, 5, 1, 4, 6, 2, 4] landed me on this page (pdf) which had a very detailed description, but also had several additional steps then you currently have in your algorithm.

So here is my implementation of that algorithm. I checked it against the calendarsolution provided by mgilson for every date since the beginning of the Gregorian calendar till 2300.

import datetime
import calendar

months = [6, 2, 2, 5, 0, 3, 5, 1, 4, 6, 2, 4]
weekdays = ["Sunday", "Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday",
            "Thursday", "Friday", "Saturday", "Sunday"]
centuries = {17: 5,
             18: 3,
             19: 1,
             20: 0,
             21: -2,
             22: -4}

def day_of_week_biogeek(day, month, year):
    # This algorithm is only valid for the Gregorian calendar
    # which began on September 14, 1752.
    if year <= 1752 and month <= 9 and day < 14:
        raise RuntimeError("This algorithm is only valid for the Gregorian " + \  
                           "calendar which began on September 14, 1752.")
    if year >= 2300:
        raise RuntimeError("This algorithm is only valid for the Gregorian " + \
                           "calendar up till December 31, 2299.")


    # Take multiples of 28 from the the last 2 digits of the year
    y = divmod(year, 100)[1] % 28

    # Add a quarter of the nearest multiple of 4 below the number,
    y += divmod(y, 4)[0]

    # Take away 7 or multiples of 7. This leaves us the year code
    y = y % 7

    # The code for the month from the table above
    m = months[month - 1]

    # If it is a leap year AND the month is January or February, subtract 1
    if is_leap_year(year) and month in [1,2]:
        m -= 1

    # Take away 7 or multiples of 7 from the day
    d = day % 7

    # Add the codes for the year, the month and the day
    result = y + m + d

    # Add 1 if the date is in the 1900s
    result += centuries[divmod(year, 100)[0]]

    # Take away 7 or multiples of 7
    result = result % 7

    # The final number indicates day of the week
    return weekdays[result]

def is_leap_year(year):
    # Leap years are the years evenly divisible by 4
    # unless it ends in 00 and is a multiple of 400
    if not year % 400:
        return True
    elif not year % 100:
        return False
    elif not year % 4:
        return True
    return False

# original code by user2080262
def yearcode(y):
    """Year Code Generator Algorithm"""
    y = y % 100
    y = y + (y / 4) % 7
    return int(round(y))

def monthcode(m):
    """Retrieve Month Number from Month List"""
    return months[m - 1]

def daycode(d):
    """Simplify Day Input for Efficiency"""
    return d % 7


def day_of_week_user2080262(dayin, monthin, yearin):
    yearout = yearcode(yearin)
    monthout = monthcode(monthin)
    dayout = daycode(dayin)
    result = int((dayout + monthout + yearout) % 7)
    return weekdays[result]

# alternate solution using builtin functions
def day_of_week_mgilson(day, month, year):
    """ See http://stackoverflow.com/a/14941764/50065"""
    c = calendar.weekday(year, month, day)
    return calendar.day_name[c]

def date_generator(day, month, year):
    """Convience function to return the next day"""
    d = datetime.date(year, month, day)
    while True:
        d += datetime.timedelta(days=1)
        yield d.day, d.month, d.year


if __name__ == '__main__':
    # checking all days from the beginning of the Gregorian
    # calender till 2300
    methods = {'user2080262': day_of_week_user2080262,
               'BioGeek': day_of_week_biogeek}
    for user, func in methods.items():
        checked = 0
        wrong = 0
        d = date_generator(14, 9, 1752)
        for day, month, year in d:
            checked += 1
            if year == 2300:
                break
            if func(day, month, year) != day_of_week_mgilson(day, month, year):
                wrong += 1
        print("The code by {0} gives a wrong answer ".format(user) + \ 
              "{0:.2f}% of the time.".format((float(wrong)/checked)*100))
share|improve this answer
    
No, your code gives a wrong answer 81.76% of the time. Among others, it doesn't take into account leap years, nor does it compensate for dates not in the 21st century. See my updated code where I compare your code against mine and mgilsons'. –  BioGeek Feb 18 '13 at 21:37
    
It runs, and gives correct answers when you try a date in the year 2013, but as soon as you try to use it for dates further back or in the future, there is a high probability that it returns a wrong answer. So, no, I wouldn't say that it works for any date. –  BioGeek Feb 19 '13 at 10:39

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