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Hoping you guys can help, I'll admit I'm a fairly new user to Perl and done some searching but honestly don't understand the options out there. Hoping you guys can explain it to me better and help me get started. So I have been able to get Perl to open the text file, read it out to an array, and write the new file just fine. Below is a shortened example of my text file:

Composition {
  CurrentTime = 0,
  OutputClips = {
    "",
  },
  Tools = {
      Text3 = Text3D {
          NameSet = true,
          Inputs  = {
            Size       = Input { Value = 0.6282723, },
            Font       = Input { Value = "KG Shadow of the Day", },
            StyledText = Input { Value = "Your Text Goes Here 3", },
      },
      ShadowDensity = BrightnessContrast {
          NameSet = true,
          Inputs  = {
            Alpha = Input { Value = 1, },
            Gain  = Input { Value = 0.5, },
            Input = Input {
                SourceOp = "Loader2",
                Source   = "Output",
            },
          },
          ViewInfo = OperatorInfo { Pos = { -220, 82.5, }, },
      },
  },
}

I need to be able to change the Value in the Text3 'StyledText = Input' as well as the ShadowDensity 'Alpha = Input' values. And I can't just do a normal expression to find 'Alpha = Input' because there are other nested items inside of the array that has the same exact name just under a different tool. Same with the Text portion if I have multiple Text tools it won't find the correct one. Any help and suggestions are welcomed. Thanks

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1  
If that's a standard file format, then a search of CPAN might yield something. –  toolic Feb 18 '13 at 17:56
    
Is the data structured and well-formatted? Maybe some path-aware parser, in order to modify Alpha= only if it appears in Compostion/Tools/ShadowDensity/Inputs. –  Jokester Feb 18 '13 at 18:01
    
Yes the data is very well formatted and structured. But not consistent in it's location. So the ShadowDensity tool may be above the Text3 Tool at times. I will go look up stuff on path-aware parsers thanks. –  KJones Feb 18 '13 at 18:03
    
Almost everything depends on how this file can be formatted. It could be used even something dumb and simple like s/(\s+StyledText = Input \{ Value = ")[^"]+/$1$your_new_value/`, otherwise you should find a module to parse it or write your own. –  ArtM Feb 18 '13 at 18:14
    
Thanks amon, I'll take a look into those two options and see if I can figure out how to go about doing this. –  KJones Feb 18 '13 at 19:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I conceived of it as a structured file with "events" that you might have wanted to handle. So I created a structured path "event" class/object and a handler mux class/object.

use strict;
use warnings;

{   package LineEvent;  # our "event" class
    use strict;
    use warnings;

    # use overload to create a default stringification for the class/object
    use overload '""' => 'as_string', fallback => 1;

    # Create new path-tracking object    
    sub new { 
        my $self   = bless {}, shift;
        my %params = @_ % 2 ? ( base => @_ ) : @_;
        for ( qw<base delim verbose> ) { 
            $self->{$_} = $params{ $_ };
        }
        $self->{base}  ||= '';
        $self->{delim} ||= '.';
        return $self;
    }

    # pop back to larger named scope
    sub pop { 
        my $self  = shift;
        my $ref   = \$self->{base};
        my $pos   = rindex( $$ref, $self->{delim} );
        if ( $pos == -1 ) { 
            $self->{current} = '!Close';
        }
        else { 
            my $node = substr( $$ref, $pos + 1 );
            substr( $$ref, $pos ) = '';
            $self->{current} = "$node.!Close";
        }
        say qq{After pop, now "$self".} if $self->{verbose};
        return $self;
    }

    # push a new name as the current scope of the path
    sub push { 
        my ( $self, $level ) = @_;
        return unless $level;
        $self->{current} = '!Open';
        my $delim        = $self->{delim};
        $self->{base}
            .= ( substr( $level, 0, length( $delim )) eq $delim ? '' : $delim ) 
            .  $level
            ;
        say qq{After push, now "$self".} if $self->{verbose};
        return $self;
    }

    # push the temporary name sitting as current onto our base
    sub push_current { 
        return $_[0]->push( $_[0]->{current} ); 
    }

    # set a temporary name to identify the current line.
    sub update { 
        my ( $self, $tip ) = @_;
        $self->{current} = $tip // '';
        say qq{After update, now: "$self".} if $self->{verbose};
        return $self;
    }

    sub null_current { delete $_[0]->{current}; }

    # used in overload
    sub as_string {
        my $self  = shift;
        return join( $self->{delim}, grep {; length } @{ $self }{ qw<base current> } );
    }
};

sub pair_up {
    return map { [ @_[ $_, $_ + 1 ] ] } grep { $_ % 2 == 0 } 0..$#_;
}

{   package PathProcessor; # our mux class

    # create a event list and handler, by splitting them into pairs.
    sub new { 
        my $self = bless [], shift;
        @$self   = &::pair_up;
        return $self;
    }

    # process the current path
    sub process_path { 
        my ( $self, $path ) = @_;
        foreach my $pair ( @$self ) {
            my ( $test, $func ) = @$pair;
            next unless ref( $test ) 
                    ? $path =~ /$test/ 
                    : substr( $path, - length( $test )) eq $test
                    ;
            my $v = $func->( $path );
            return $v || !defined( $v );
        }
        return 1;
    }
}

my $path  = LineEvent->new( base => 'x' );

my $processor  
    = PathProcessor->new( 
      '.Text3.Inputs.StyledText' => sub { s/\bText\b/_Styled_ Text/ || 1; }
    , '.ShadowDensity.Inputs.Alpha' => sub { 
          s/(Value \s+ = \s+ )\K(\d+(?:\.\d+)?)/0.5/x || 1;
      }
    #, '.!Close' => sub { 
    #    say 'Closed!';
    #  }
    );

# We only handle a couple of conditions...
while ( <DATA> ) { 
    chomp;
    # ... If there is a keyword as the first thing in line
    if ( m/^ \s* ( \p{IsUpper} \w+ \b )/gcx ) {
        $path->update( $1 );
        # ... if it is followed by a equals sign, an optional name and
        # and open-bracket
        if ( m/\G \s+ = \s+ (?: \p{IsUpper} \w+ \s+ )? [{] \s* $/gcx ) {
            $path->push_current;
        }
    }
    # ... if it's a closing brace with an optional comma. 
    elsif ( m/^ \s* [}] ,? \s* $/x ) { 
        $path->pop;
    }
    else {
        $path->null_current;
    }
    say $path;
    # you can omit a line by passing back a false value
    say if $processor->process_path( $path );
}

__DATA__
Composition {
  CurrentTime = 0,
  OutputClips = {
    "",
  },
  Tools = {
      Text3 = Text3D {
          NameSet = true,
          Inputs  = {
            Size       = Input { Value = 0.6282723, },
            Font       = Input { Value = "KG Shadow of the Day", },
            StyledText = Input { Value = "Your Text Goes Here 3", },
          },
      },
      ShadowDensity = BrightnessContrast {
          NameSet = true,
          Inputs  = {
            Alpha = Input { Value = 1, },
            Gain  = Input { Value = 0.5, },
            Input = Input {
                SourceOp = "Loader2",
                Source   = "Output",
            },
          },
          ViewInfo = OperatorInfo { Pos = { -220, 82.5, }, },
      },
  },
}

The output was:

x.Composition
Composition {
x.CurrentTime
  CurrentTime = 0,
x.OutputClips.!Open
  OutputClips = {
x.OutputClips.!Text.1
    "",
x.OutputClips.!Close
  },
x.Tools.!Open
  Tools = {
x.Tools.Text3.!Open
      Text3 = Text3D {
x.Tools.Text3.NameSet
          NameSet = true,
x.Tools.Text3.Inputs.!Open
          Inputs  = {
x.Tools.Text3.Inputs.Size
            Size       = Input { Value = 0.6282723, },
x.Tools.Text3.Inputs.Font
            Font       = Input { Value = "KG Shadow of the Day", },
x.Tools.Text3.Inputs.StyledText
            StyledText = Input { Value = "Your _Styled_ Text Goes Here 3", },
x.Tools.Text3.Inputs.!Close
          },
x.Tools.Text3.!Close
      },
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.!Open
      ShadowDensity = BrightnessContrast {
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.NameSet
          NameSet = true,
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.Inputs.!Open
          Inputs  = {
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.Inputs.Alpha
            Alpha = Input { Value = 0.5, },
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.Inputs.Gain
            Gain  = Input { Value = 0.5, },
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.Inputs.Input.!Open
            Input = Input {
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.Inputs.Input.SourceOp
                SourceOp = "Loader2",
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.Inputs.Input.Source
                Source   = "Output",
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.Inputs.Input.!Close
            },
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.Inputs.!Close
          },
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.ViewInfo
          ViewInfo = OperatorInfo { Pos = { -220, 82.5, }, },
x.Tools.ShadowDensity.!Close
      },
x.Tools.!Close
  },
x.!Close
}
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This is a solution using Marpa::R2 and overloaded objects. It turned out longer than expected, but looks round-trip compatible.

The header is simple:

use strict; use warnings; use feature 'say';
use Marpa::R2;

use constant DEBUG => 0;

exit main();

This will require Perl5, version 10 or later. Next comes the parse subroutine. This will do the tokenization, and invoke the parser. Most tokens are specified as data (not explicit code), so that they can be easily extended.

The $print_diag is an anonymous sub. It closes over the $string and the $last_pos and can therefore print an appropriate error message similar to die. It will point out the context of a tokenization problem with a HERE--> arrow.

The $match if a similar closure. It loops through all available tokens and returns the matching token, or a false value on failure. It uses m/\G.../gc regexes. These are similar to s/^...//, but don't destroy the string. The \G assertions will match at pos($string). The /c option makes sure that failure doesn't alter pos.

The string token is matched manually. You may want to process escapes. I added support for a few popular escapes (\\, \", \n, \t and line-continuation backslash).

The TOKEN loop pulls tokens and stuffs them into the recognizer. It includes little code and much error handling.

At last, we take the first possible $parse tree (there might be multiple), and check if it was successful. If so, we return the data structure:

my $grammar; # filled later in INIT block

sub parse {
    my ($string) = @_;
    my ($last_pos, $length) = (0, length $string);
    my $rec = Marpa::R2::Recognizer->new({ grammar => $grammar });

    my $print_diag = sub {
        my ($problem) = @_;
        my ($behind, $ahead) = (15, 30);
        my $start = $last_pos > $behind ? $last_pos - $behind : 0;
        say STDERR "$problem at ", map ">>$_<<", join " HERE-->",
            substr($string, $start,    $behind),
            substr($string, $last_pos, $ahead );
        exit 1;
    };

    my @capture_token = (
        [qr/true|false/     => 'Bool'],     # bool must come before ident
        [qr/-?\d+(?:\.\d+)?/=> 'Number'],   # number must come before ident
        [qr/\w+/            => 'Ident'],
    );
    my @non_capture_token  = (
        [qr/\{/     => 'LCurly'],
        [qr/\}/     => 'RCurly'],
        [qr/=/      => 'Equal'],
        [qr/,/      => 'Comma'],
    );

    my $match = sub {
        # try String manually here:
        if ($string =~ m/\G"( (?: [^"]++ | \\. )*+ )"/gcxs) {
            my $str = $1;
            my %escapes = ( n => "\n", t => "\t", "\n" => '' );
            $str =~ s{\\(.)}{ $escapes{$1} // $1 }esg;
            return String => $str;
        }
        for (@non_capture_token) {
            my ($re, $type) = @$_;
            return $type if $string =~ m/\G$re/gc;
        }
        for (@capture_token) {
            my ($re, $type) = @$_;
            return $type, $1 if $string =~ m/\G($re)/gc;
        }
        return;
    };

    pos $string = $last_pos; # set match start for \G assertion to beginning

    TOKEN: while ($last_pos < $length) {
        next TOKEN if $string =~ m/\G\s+/gc;
        next TOKEN if $string =~ m/\G\#\N+/gc; # skip comments if you have such

        if (my @token = $match->()) {
            say STDERR "Token [@token]" if DEBUG;
            my $ok = $rec->read(@token);
            unless (defined $ok) {
                $print_diag->("Token [@token] rejected");
            }
        } else {
            $print_diag->("Can't understand input");
        }
    } continue {
        $last_pos = pos $string;
    }

    my $parse = $rec->value;
    unless ($parse) {
        say STDERR "Could not parse input";
        say STDERR "The Progress so far:";
        say STDERR $rec->show_progress;
        exit 1;
    }
    return $$parse;
}

Now we specify the grammar. Marpa can be handled via a BNF-like notation which I use here. I t is mostly syntactic sugar above lower-level methods. I can specify actions (which I write later), and can decide to not capture tokens by putting them into parens. At this stage, I can only work with token types, not with the value of tokens. After I specify the grammar, I have to compile it with $grammar->precompute.

INIT {
    $grammar = Marpa::R2::Grammar->new({
        actions         => "MyActions", # a package name
        default_action  => 'first_arg',
        source          => \(<<'END_OF_GRAMMAR'),
        :start  ::= Value

        Value   ::= Bool            action => doBool
                |   Number          # use auto-action
                |   String          # use auto-action
                ||  Array
                ||  Struct

        Struct  ::= Ident (LCurly) PairList (RCurly)    action => doStruct
                |         (LCurly) PairList (RCurly)    action => doStruct1

        Array   ::= Ident (LCurly) ItemList (RCurly)    action => doArray
                |         (LCurly) ItemList (RCurly)    action => doArray1


        ItemList::= Value +         separator => Comma  action => doList
        PairList::= Pair +          separator => Comma  action => doList
        Pair    ::= Ident (Equal) Value                 action => doPair
END_OF_GRAMMAR
    });
    $grammar->precompute;
}

The above is in an INIT block so it will be executed before the parse is done.

Now come our actions. Each action will be invoked with an action object as first argument, which we do not need (it is helpful for more advanced parsing techniques). The other arguments are the values (not the types) of the tokens/rules that were matched. Most of these discard or pack arguments, or put the data inside the later defined objects.

sub MyActions::first_arg {
    say STDERR "rule default action" if DEBUG;
    my (undef, $first) = @_;
    return $first;
}

sub MyActions::doStruct {
    say STDERR "rule Struct" if DEBUG;
    my (undef, $ident, $pair_list) = @_;
    my %hash;
    for (@$pair_list) {
        my ($k, $v) = @$_;
        $hash{$k} = $v;
    }
    return MyHash->new($ident, \%hash);
}

sub MyActions::doStruct1 {
    say STDERR "rule Struct sans Ident" if DEBUG;
    my (undef, $pair_list) = @_;
    return MyActions::doStruct(undef, undef, $pair_list);
}

sub MyActions::doArray {
    say STDERR "rule Array" if DEBUG;
    my (undef, $ident, $items) = @_;
    return MyArray->new($ident, $items);
}

sub MyActions::doArray1 {
    say STDERR "rule Array sans Ident" if DEBUG;
    my (undef, $items) = @_;
    MyActions::doArray(undef, undef, $items);
}

sub MyActions::doList {
    say STDERR "List" if DEBUG;
    my (undef, @list) = @_;
    return \@list;
}

sub MyActions::doPair {
    say STDERR "Pair" if DEBUG;
    my (undef, $key, $value) = @_;
    return [$key, $value];
}

sub MyActions::doBool {
    say STDERR "Bool" if DEBUG;
    my (undef, $bool) = @_;
    return MyBool->new($bool);
}

That was fairly unspectacular. We need these special objects, because (a) they will later stringify themselves into the correct form, and (b) so that I can associate types or whatever that not-quite-a-name before the curlies is. (And (c), Perl does not have a boolean type, which I have to override).

First come two helpers: The $My::Indent sets the number of spaces the printout will be indented by. The My::stringifyHelper just makes sure that Objects are coerced to their string representations, and that strings (everything else that isn't a number) is surrounded by quotes.

INIT{ $My::Indent = 4 }
sub My::stringifyHelper {
    my (@objects) = @_;
    for (@objects) {
        if (ref $_) {
            $_ = "$_";
        } elsif ( not /\A-?\d+(?:\.\d+)?\z/) {
            $_ = qq("$_");
        }
    }
    return @objects;
}

Here it the MyHash type. The stringification code is ugly, but it seems to work → programming by accident.

{
    package MyHash;
    sub new {
        my ($class, $type, $hashref) = @_;
        bless [$type, $hashref] => $class;
    }
    sub type {
        my ($self) = @_;
        return $self->[0];
    }
    sub hash {
        my ($self) = @_;
        return $self->[1];
    }
    sub asString {
        my ($self) = @_;
        my @keys = sort keys %{ $self->hash };
        my @vals =
            map { s/\n\K/" "x$My::Indent/meg; $_ }
            My::stringifyHelper @{ $self->hash }{@keys};
        my $string = "";
        for my $i (0 .. $#keys) {
            $string .= (" "x$My::Indent) . "$keys[$i] = $vals[$i],\n";
        }
        return +($self->type // "") . "{\n$string}";
    }
    use overload
        '""'        => \&asString,
        '%{}'       => \&hash,
        fallback    => 1;
}

This implements MyArray. Stringification is slightly less ugly, but I represent the object as a hash. I am not proficient enough with overload to make sure it wouldn't otherwise recurse when accessing the actual array.

{
    package MyArray;
    sub new {
        my ($class, $type, $aryref) = @_;
        bless { type => $type, array => $aryref } => $class;
    }
    sub type {
        my ($self) = @_;
        return $self->{type};
    }
    sub array {
        my ($self) = @_;
        no overload;
        return $self->{array};
    }
    sub asString {
        my ($self) = @_;
        my @els = My::stringifyHelper @{$self->array};
        my $string = $self->type // "";
        if (@els <= 1) {
            $string .=  "{ @els, }";
        } else {
            my $els = join '', map "$_,\n", @els;
            $els =~ s/^/" "x$My::Indent/meg;
            $string .= "{\n$els}";
        }
        return $string;
    }
    use overload
        '""'        => \&asString,
        '@{}'       => \&array,
        fallback    => 1;
}

Now the small MyBool implementation. It should even work like a boolean :)

{
    package MyBool;
    sub new {
        my ($class, $str) = @_;
        my $bool;
        if ('true' eq lc $str)      { $bool = 1     }
        elsif ('false' eq lc $str)  { $bool = undef }
        else { die "Don't know if $str is true or false" }
        bless \$bool => $class;
    }
    use overload
        'bool' => sub {
            my ($self) = @_;
            return $$self;
        },
        '""' => sub {
            my ($self) = @_;
            $$self ? 'true' : 'false';
        },
        fallback => 1;
}

Now we are nearly finished. Here comes the main:

sub main {
    local $/;
    my $data = <DATA>;
    my $dsc = parse($data);

    say "/:";
    say $dsc;

    say "/Tools:";
    say $dsc->{Tools};

    say "/Tools/ShadowDensity/:";
    say $dsc->{Tools}{ShadowDensity};

    say "/Tools/ShadowDensity/Inputs/:";
    say $dsc->{Tools}{ShadowDensity}{Inputs};

    return 0;
}

This loads and parses the data. Then it prints out the whole object, and certain parts only. This seems to work so far.

A note: If you run the parser over the data you provided as input, it will fail. Tokenization succeeds, but you forgot a closing brace somewhere. After fixing that, it should work.

Todo:

  • Some parts use exit 1 where an exception should be thrown.
  • The above accesses work, but other paths fail (they return undef). There is a bug somewhere, which needs to be fixed, but I have no clue.
  • Better error messages would be great, and more diversity in debug levels.
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