Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm seeing some odd behavior, I was hoping someone here can shine some light on the issue.

Let me start by describing my setup. First, a simple data object

public class Apple {
    private String name;
    public Apple withName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
        return this;
    }
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
}

And a test class..

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(classes={TestConfig.class})
public class AppleTest {
    @Autowired private Apple apples;

    @Test
    public void simpleTest() {
        System.out.println("OBJ: "+apples);
    }
}

The config is as follows

@Configuration
public interface ConfigInterface {
    public Apple getApple();
}

With an implementing class

@Configuration
@Import(AbstractTestConfig.class)
public class TestConfig implements ConfigInterface {
    public Apple getApple() {
        return new Apple().withName("Granny apples");
    }
}

With the config dependency...

@Configuration
public class AbstractTestConfig {
    @Autowired ConfigInterface conf;

    @Bean Apple myTestApple() {
        return conf.getApple();
    }
}

All of this works great. I run the test, I see the output I expect. But then I throw a spanner into the wheel and modify AbstractTestConfig to look as follows.

@Configuration
public class AbstractTestConfig {
    @Autowired ConfigInterface conf;

    @Bean Apple myTestApple() {
        return conf.getApple();
    }

    // NEW CODE
    @Bean CustomScopeConfigurer scopeConfigurer() {
        return new CustomScopeConfigurer();
    }
}

And all of a sudden the @Autowired object conf is null when it is required to construct the Apple bean.

Even more odd, if I move the CustomScopeConfigurer bean to the TestConfig class, then it works.

Is there something I don't know about scopes or the CustomScopeConfigurer object in particular?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Copied from Spring @Bean javadoc:

BeanFactoryPostProcessor-returning @Bean methods

Special consideration must be taken for @Bean methods that return Spring BeanFactoryPostProcessor (BFPP) types. Because BFPP objects must be instantiated very early in the container lifecycle, they can interfere with processing of annotations such as @Autowired, @Value, and @PostConstruct within @Configuration classes. To avoid these lifecycle issues, mark BFPP-returning @Bean methods as static. For example:

@Bean
 public static PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer ppc() {
     // instantiate, configure and return ppc ...
 }

By marking this method as static, it can be invoked without causing instantiation of its declaring @Configuration class, thus avoiding the above-mentioned lifecycle conflicts. Note however that static @Bean methods will not be enhanced for scoping and AOP semantics as mentioned above. This works out in BFPP cases, as they are not typically referenced by other @Bean methods. As a reminder, a WARN-level log message will be issued for any non-static @Bean methods having a return type assignable to BeanFactoryPostProcessor.

share|improve this answer

After carefully scrutinizing the spring log output, I came upon this little saviour:

[junit] 1141 [main] WARN  org.springframework.context.annotation.ConfigurationClassEnhancer  - @Bean method AbstractTestConfig.scopeConfigurer is non-static and returns an object assignable to Spring's BeanFactoryPostProcessor interface. This will result in a failure to process annotations such as @Autowired, @Resource and @PostConstruct within the method's declaring @Configuration class. Add the 'static' modifier to this method to avoid these container lifecycle issues; see @Bean Javadoc for complete details

I don't really understand why having it as static makes a difference though.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.