Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a slider/fader in JavaScript. I'm using JavaScript in a way I've never actually used it before by declaring an object thusly:

var Object
{
    // Statements & functions.
}

I'm having an issue retrieving the value of a variable (testing) inside the object from a function (change_slide()) also inside the object. I have this code:

var Fader = 
{
    // Fader properties.
    speed: 1,                                   // The time each interval will take.
    fade: 0.1,                                  // How much to change the slides opacity with each interval.
    divs: ["fade_1", "fade_2", "fade_3"],       // Array.
    callbacks: [],                              // Array.
    testing: 0123456798,

    // Initialise fader.
    initialise: function()
    {
        // Randomise the starting slide.
        this.start_div = Math.floor((Math.random() * this.divs.length) + 1);

        // Add pips and initialise display (block or none) for the slides.
        for(var i = 0; i < this.divs.length; i++)
        {
            /*
            *       Create pips.
            */
            var new_pip = document.createElement("div");

            new_pip.className = "item";
            new_pip.id        = "pip_" + (1 + i);
            document.getElementById("pips").appendChild(new_pip);

            /*
            *       Get current div number.
            */
            var extract_div_number = this.divs[i].replace("fade_", "");

            if(extract_div_number == this.start_div)
            {
                //this.current_slide = extract_div_number;

                document.getElementById("fade_" + extract_div_number).style.display = "block";
            }
            else
            {
                document.getElementById("fade_" + extract_div_number).style.display = "none";
            }
        }

        this.pip_controller();
    },

    pip_controller: function()
    {
        for(var i = 0; i < this.divs.length; i++)
        {
            this.callbacks[i] = this.add_event("pip_" + (1 + i));
        }
    },

    add_event: function(item)
    {
        if(window.addEventListener)
        {
            return document.getElementById(item).addEventListener("click", this.change_slide, false);
        }
        else
        {
            return document.getElementById(item).attachEvent("onclick", this.change_slide);
        }
    },

    change_slide: function()
    {
        // Always returns "undefined" despite 'testing' being defined previously.
        console.log(this.testing);
    },
}

Fader.initialise();

// This works:
// Fader.change_slide();

This is my HTML:

<div id="main_slide">

    <div id="fade_1"><h1>Slide 1</h1></div>
    <div id="fade_2"><h1>Slide 2</h1></div>
    <div id="fade_3"><h1>Slide 3</h1></div>

    <div id="pips"></div>

</div>

For the record "pips" are those little circle things at the bottom of the slider you can click to change slides.

So, can anybody tell me why testing is returning undefined, and how I can make my current code retrieve the actual value of testing?

share|improve this question
    
It's a matter of function scope, and the fact that when change_slide is called it's no longer in the same scope as the others. Try changing this.testing to Fader.testing in the example and see it do what you want. Otherwise, this is honestly a dupe about how function scope works wrt this. –  jcolebrand Feb 18 '13 at 17:51
    
@jcolebrand: Not "scope", but the value of the this pseudo-argument, which is a different thing from scope. And yeah, this question has been asked and answered in various forms several times. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Feb 18 '13 at 17:54
    
I don't see how, in one case it's getting executed against one element, and in another place it's getting executed against another element (namely the Fader element vs the DOM specific element). –  jcolebrand Feb 18 '13 at 17:55
    
Should I instead be saying the "function binding"? Most folks who don't understand javascript won't understand that either. I found that scope is a better indicator to most folks than binding @T.J.Crowder –  jcolebrand Feb 18 '13 at 17:57
1  
@jcolebrand: Right. But that's not "scope." "Scope" has a specific meaning, which relates to what free identifiers a function has access to (via the "scope chain", which -- unlike this -- is lexically determined). This isn't an issue of scope, it's the fact that this is not lexically bound, but runtime-bound. Sadly, there isn't a good word for it. "Scope" definitely isn't it, it's already used. Some people tried "context" for a while, but "context" is already dramatically over-used and it didn't catch on. So I just avoid trying to use a term for it at all. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Feb 18 '13 at 17:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

addEventListener calls the function you give it with this pointing at the DOM element, not the instance of your class, so this line (and others like it) is the problem:

return document.getElementById(item).addEventListener("click", this.change_slide, false);

There are a couple of ways to deal with that, for instance:

initialize: function() {
    var self = this;

    // ...

    return document.getElementById(item).addEventListener("click", function(e) {
        return self.change_slide(e);
    }, false);

    // ...
},

Or in an ES5-enabled environment (or if you have an ES5 shim loaded, because this is shim-able), you can use the new Function#bind:

return document.getElementById(item).addEventListener("click", this.change_slide.bind(this), false);

More (on my blog):

share|improve this answer
    
What are you thoughts on this approach? stackoverflow.com/a/1982952/109749 –  jcolebrand Feb 18 '13 at 18:03
1  
Now I realise why JavaScript was giving me the error Object #<HTMLDivElement> has no method 'change_slide' for a previously attempted work around, which I couldn't figure out. Thanks for the links, I'll be reading more on your blog. –  George88 Feb 18 '13 at 18:18
    
@George88: Glad that helped! :-) –  T.J. Crowder Feb 18 '13 at 18:35
    
@jcolebrand: Interesting! Whatever gets the job done, really. Since George88 already has an execution context handy, the var self = this; thing is low-impact. But still, interesting idea passing it as extra event data. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 18 '13 at 18:36
    
@T.J.Crowder Aye, I had never contemplated that either, but in looking for a reasonable dupe (as this sort of question gets asked on SO quite frequently) I saw that interesting concept. Cheers! –  jcolebrand Feb 18 '13 at 19:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.