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I'm doing some really heavy and slow scientific simulations and I was wondering if it was possible to make my program show some information about its status when the user presses a key.

It doesn't need to be portable, just for linux.

Currently, I have a code of this kind:

main()
{
    //SOME GLOBAL INITIALIZATIONS

    //this loop is parallelized
    for(i=0;i<max;i++)
    {
        //Some particular to i initializations

        for(j=0;max2;j++)
        {
            // Here are all the slow and ugly calculations
            // the status should be able to be shown when
            // my program is here
        }
    }
    // Final calculations and final data
}

Not sure if it is even possible, but sometimes one may think that the code is stopped or doing nothing, and this could be very helpful.

Also, if it is not possible to do this and use at the same time omp, I can use a more "manual" parallelization.

Thanks in advance!

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2  
key press is possible, however, signals would do the trick too while easier to implement –  cIph3r Feb 18 '13 at 18:02
2  
what about showing some info from time to time? if you really want that key feature i guess youll need to use threads. –  solusipse Feb 18 '13 at 18:14
    
I'd agree with solusipse, if you want your application as simple as you have shown it, then I'd probably just print status each time through the j loop. This will be the simplest solution. –  Josh Petitt Feb 18 '13 at 18:34
    
On some unix systems, there a terminal status control key (ctrl-T) that generates a signal. But Linux doesn't do it. :( –  luser droog Feb 18 '13 at 18:38
1  
@Noxbru, it is possible, but not with the application you've shown. You would need to spawn a thread for the background calculations. The foreground process (i.e. main) would poll for keypresses, query the calculator and print the status. You could have a simple status integer that the calculator thread writes and the main thread reads. This would serve as a basic message passing system. –  Josh Petitt Feb 18 '13 at 19:02

4 Answers 4

You can use the pthreads library: Have one thread waiting for the key or whatever signal and when it is triggered. If you need to do some expensive computations to show the output variables, use a lock to stop execution of the simulation, print the variables and release the lock. Don't know if that can get to work with openmp thought.

If you just need to print the vars, there shouldn't be a problem in mixing pthreads and openmp.

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You can use ncurses' getch()

#include <ctype.h>
#include <ncurses.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int keywaiting(int *key) {
  int ch;
  ch = getch();
  if ((ch != ERR) && key) *key = ch;
  return (ch != ERR);
}

int yourprogram(void) {
  int max = 1000, max2 = 1000;
  int i, j;
  int ch;
  /* SOME GLOBAL INITIALIZATIONS */
  /* this loop is parallelized */
  for (i = 0; i < max; i++) {
    /* Some particular to i initializations */
    for (j = 0; j < max2; j++) {
    /* Here are all the slow and ugly calculations */
    /* the status should be able to be shown when */
    /* my program is here */
      printf("%03d%03d\r", i, j);
      if (keywaiting(&ch)) {
        printf("\r\n\r\nAborted @ i = %d; j = %d\r\n", i, j);
        printf("Keypress %d ('%c')\r\n\n", ch, isprint((unsigned char)ch) ? ch : '.');
        printf("Press any key ...");
        refresh();
        i = max;
        j = max2;
      }
    }
  }
  /* Final calculations and final data */
  return 0;
}
int main(void) {
  /* initialize ncurses */
  initscr();
  nodelay(stdscr, TRUE);
  noecho();
  keypad(stdscr, TRUE);
  curs_set(0);

  yourprogram();

  getchar();
  /* done with ncurses */
  clear();
  refresh();
  endwin();

  return 0;
}

Don't forget to link with the curses library.

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Thanks for the suggestion about ncurses' getch() –  Noxbru Feb 19 '13 at 19:37

here's an example that uses signals (but partially written in c++, the signal handling is not):

//ctrl+c to output status, ctrl+z to quit

//#include <iostream> c++ syntax
#include <stdio.h>
#include <signal.h>
volatile sig_atomic_t showStatus = 0;

void signalHandler(int sig){
    if (sig==SIGINT){
        showStatus=1;
    }
    if (sig==SIGTSTP){
        showStatus=2;
    }
}


int main(int argc, char** argv){
    signal(SIGINT,signalHandler);
    signal(SIGTSTP,signalHandler);
    while(true){
        if (showStatus==1){
            showStatus=0;
            //std::cout << "status" << std::endl; c++ syntax
                    printf("status\n");
        }else if(showStatus>1){
            break;
        }

    }

    return 0;

}
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1  
why not replace the C++ parts with C? –  Robert Martin Feb 18 '13 at 18:29
    
But in your example, the flow has to arrive to the if(ShowStatus) part, I'd like it to be able to work wherever is the program. –  Noxbru Feb 18 '13 at 18:33
1  
ok, but then you will need threads otherwise, you could execute all status-info in the signalhandler (where the variable is incremented) but this would be against specification of signal handling in c –  cIph3r Feb 18 '13 at 18:35
1  
you can do threads in plain C using posix threads. –  Jonas Wielicki Feb 18 '13 at 18:41
1  
@JonasWielicki ok, posix threads would work too. Then you'll have to create an event-loops where you listen for key-input. Then read the statusvariables and print them out. Unfortunately I never worked with posix threads :( –  cIph3r Feb 18 '13 at 18:47

Ok, thanks for all your sugestions. I have managed to get something similar to what I wanted, It's not the same but will serve (^_^)

Here is the code, it just spawns a thread that will wait for a character, then 'switches' the report array from 0 to 1. When each omp thread starts each 'j' iteration they will check for the report and will report if needed.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <omp.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <ncurses.h>

unsigned char *report; // this will store whether a thread has to report or not
int max_threads;

void *check_keyboard(void *whatever)
{
    int c;
    int i;

    newterm(NULL,stdin,stdout); // I want to still see the terminal :)
    noecho();
    cbreak();

    while(1)
    {
        if(getch())
        {
            for(i = 0; i < max_threads; i++)
                report[i]=1;
        }
    }

    return NULL;
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    int i,j;
    int tid;
    pthread_t thread0;

    max_threads = omp_get_max_threads();
    report = malloc(max_threads*sizeof(unsigned char));

    pthread_create(&thread0,NULL,check_keyboard,NULL);

#pragma omp parallel private(i,j,tid) shared(report)
    {
    tid = omp_get_thread_num();

#pragma omp for
    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        for(j = 0; j < 10; j++)
        {
#pragma omp critical
            {
            if(report[tid])
            {
                fprintf(stderr,"Hello World from thread %d\n\r",tid);
                fprintf(stderr,"This is iteration i: %d, j: %d\n\r",i,j);
                report[tid] = 0;
            }
            }
            sleep(1); // This 'is' a test for the long and ugly code
        }
    }
    }

    pthread_cancel(thread0);
    pthread_exit(NULL);
    return 0;
}
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