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Ive read that private variables should be marked as private, otherwise they are protected, and is considered a best practice? Can someone explain this for objective C? I come from a C# background.

   // BAD

    @interface Test: NSObject
    {
        NSString* _name;
    }

    @property (nonatomic, retain) NSString* name;

    // GOOD

    @interface Test: NSObject
    {
        @private
        NSString* _name;
    }

    @property (nonatomic, retain) NSString* name;
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You are correct. Like all languages, expose only what you need. The answer posted by @rmaddy is pretty straight forward example using more modern techniques (since XCode 4.0). That being said, there is a lot of customization that can be done in exposing private variables. –  Mike D Feb 18 '13 at 18:46
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Taking advantage of modern Objective-C:

// Best
// .h file
@interface Test : NSObject

// public properties and methods declarations

@end

// .m file
@interface Test ()

// private properties declarations here

@end

@implementation Test {
    // private ivars here - if needed
}

// method implementations here

@end

The samples you posted represent older practices before the newer approach became available with modern Objective-C.

There is no longer a need to put any ivars in the .h file meaning there is no use for the @private declaration. The only thing that should be in the .h anymore is public method and public property declarations. Everything else goes in the .m file.

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Ok but can you answer the question for the older syntax. –  Mike Flynn Feb 18 '13 at 18:54
    
Sorry, I thought I did. Yes, the "bad" practice you posted defaults to "protected". The "good" practice makes the ivars private. Making them private is better because it further ensures good encapsulation. Allowing subclasses to have direct access to protected ivars from the base class breaks encapsulation. –  rmaddy Feb 18 '13 at 18:58
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