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Have a look at this page: rozbub

As you see, there is a fix header on the top and a scrollable content below. The content inside the black div scrolls well, but the image is fixed. How can I let this image scroll too?

Basically, I defined the main wrappers as following:

body{
    width: 100%;   
    height: 100%; 
    overflow: hidden;
    margin: 0px;
}

#generalWrapper{
    height: 100%;
}

#header{
    height: 70px;
    width: 100%;
    background: #080808;
}

#content{
    overflow: auto;
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    top: 70px;
    bottom: 0;
    background: url("../images/background.jpg");
    background-repeat: repeat-y;
}

with a structure like

<body>
    <generalWrapper>
        <header>
        </header>
        <content>
        </content>
    </generalWrapper>
</body>

Then, the content div is filled with elements (which make this div taller than the screen and results in scrollability). But why is the background image not affected?

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1  
You might want to consider using a wider background image. I'm on a 2560px-wide monitor, and the background only takes up about 3/4 of the width of my screen; the rest is a solid white background. –  Jules Mazur Feb 18 '13 at 20:22

3 Answers 3

Try setting the background-attacment to scroll. W3Schools has a tutorial outlining the property.

EDIT: Here's a more reliable link, straight from the W3C's mouth.

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1  
Jules, I would advise against using W3Schools for any technical reference, if needed use a more valid source such as MDN developer.mozilla.org/es/docs/CSS/background here is why W3Schools should be avoided w3fools.com –  leopic Feb 18 '13 at 20:33

It looks like you are scrolling divs inside your content div, but the content div itself is not scrolled. Try to look through the list of errors found on your site by W3C's Markup validator.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I tried a different approach. First of all, I put the background image on the html, with following attributes

html{
    background: url("../background.jpg") center center #000; 
    -webkit-background-size: cover;
    -moz-background-size: cover;
    -o-background-size: cover;
    background-size: cover; 
}

Then, I changed the header and content to

#header{
    height: 70px;
    width: 100%;
    background: #080808;
    position: fixed;
    z-index: 55;
    box-shadow: 5px 5px 5px 5px #080808;
}

#content{
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    top: 70px;
    bottom: 0;
}

which results in exactly that behaviour I desired (Although the problem considered by Jules Mazur in the comment is not solved, I will try to solve this by providing different images for different resolutions).

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