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If I have some class, and within that class I have a custom made Queue object that I have written, and my class def looks like this:

class Parser
{
    public:
        Parser();
    private:
        Queue<char> Q;
};

And class Queue has a default constructor as well as a constructor that takes a single int parameter to specify its capacity, how do I tell the Parser class that when it instantiates the Q field it should fire the constructor that takes a parameter (so it can have a larger capacity) rather than fire the default constructor (which has a pretty small capacity) ? I've looked this up but I am having a hard time finding an answer that doesn't revolve around inheritance and parent class constructors. Thanks!

Also, I have tried replacing Queue<char> Q with Queue<char> Q(100) but the compiler complains about this.

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It's not QT that complains, it's your compiler –  Andy Prowl Feb 18 '13 at 19:14
    
noted, thank you –  BrownBeard93423 Feb 19 '13 at 20:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the constructor implementation of Parser use the initializer list...

Parser::Parser()
:Q(10) ///example of initializing to capacity 10
{
}
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Like so:

Parser() : Q(100) { }
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It is in the member-initialization-list where you choose the constructor:

  • If you want to invoke the default constructor, then do this:

    Parser() : Q() {} //calls the default constructor
    

    Since you don't pass any argument, then the above is same as:

     Parser() {} //Q is also constructed invoking the default constructor
    

    Before entering into the body of Parser constructor, Q is fully constructed by invoking the default constructor.

  • If you want to invoke the other constructor, do this:

    Parser() : Q(10) {} //calls the other constructor
    

    This is what you want. In such cases, you usually want to pass the size to Parser which then does this:

    Parser(int size) : Q(size) {} //calls the other constructor
    

In C++11, you can do this in the declaration itself as:

class Parser
{
     //...
     Queue<char> Q(10); //C++11 only
};
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