Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array of 2d vertices and I want to detect if there are any arch or circle shapes in a array. Sometimes the values are not that precise and I need a small range. Here are the values. The 3rd verticle value value remains 0:

verticle:  -0.014848, -13.2684, 0 angle : 0.141274
verticle:  -0.0174556, -4.84519, 0 angle : 90
verticle:  0, 0, 0 angle : 90
verticle:  -9.53674e-07, 14.14, 0 angle : 40.7168
verticle:  -12.1101, 14.0709, 0 angle : 7.94458
verticle:  -12.0996, 10.6442, 0 angle : 0.294751
verticle:  -12.2305, 10.6484, 0 angle : 0.24309
verticle:  -12.325, 10.6384, 0 angle : 0.349426
verticle:  -12.4475, 10.6125, 0 angle : 0.392669
verticle:  -12.5638, 10.564, 0 angle : 0.404935
verticle:  -12.678, 10.508, 0 angle : 0.34605
verticle:  -12.7579, 10.4453, 0 angle : 0.391671
verticle:  -12.8315, 10.36, 0 angle : 0.390671
verticle:  -12.9051, 10.2747, 0 angle : 0.438795
verticle:  -12.9725, 10.1668, 0 angle : 0.455425
verticle:  -13.0377, 10.0514, 0 angle : 0.300014
verticle:  -13.0407, 9.94522, 0 angle : 0.388662
verticle:  -13.0738, 9.83064, 0 angle : 0.338041
verticle:  -13.0725, 9.70936, 0 angle : 0.254878
verticle:  -13.0412, 9.59645, 0 angle : 0.257171
verticle:  -13.0098, 9.48352, 0 angle : 0.259443
verticle:  -12.9785, 9.37061, 0 angle : 0.158259
verticle:  -12.9192, 9.27357, 0 angle : 0.0713262
verticle:  -12.8297, 9.18489, 0 angle : 0.14537
verticle:  -12.7724, 9.09539, 0 angle : 0.0484566
verticle:  -12.657, 9.03012, 0 angle : 0.0197823
verticle:  -12.5738, 8.96403, 0 angle : 0.125115
verticle:  -12.4667, 8.92887, 0 angle : 0.219397
verticle:  -12.3296, 8.90207, 0 angle : 0.185575
verticle:  -12.2288, 8.88951, 0 angle : 0.299361
verticle:  -12.1, 8.89282, 0 angle : 11.3066
verticle:  -12.1075, 5.64764, 0 angle : 0.158259
verticle:  -12.2062, 5.65268, 0 angle : 0.266879
verticle:  -12.3329, 5.64184, 0 angle : 0.312787
verticle:  -12.4554, 5.61594, 0 angle : 0.384104
verticle:  -12.5717, 5.56746, 0 angle : 0.322034
verticle:  -12.6557, 5.5198, 0 angle : 0.45024
verticle:  -12.7657, 5.44874, 0 angle : 0.416371
verticle:  -12.8415, 5.37097, 0 angle : 0.464781
verticle:  -12.913, 5.27815, 0 angle : 0.514343
verticle:  -12.9803, 5.17027, 0 angle : 0.436111
verticle:  -13.0176, 5.07075, 0 angle : 0.487788
verticle:  -13.0506, 4.95617, 0 angle : 0.439686
verticle:  -13.0515, 4.84242, 0 angle : 0.441462
verticle:  -13.0524, 4.72867, 0 angle : 0.470222
verticle:  -13.0511, 4.6074, 0 angle : 0.399585
verticle:  -13.0198, 4.49448, 0 angle : 0.402998
verticle:  -12.9885, 4.38156, 0 angle : 0.305828
verticle:  -12.9291, 4.28452, 0 angle : 0.237388
verticle:  -12.8396, 4.19585, 0 angle : 0.213062
verticle:  -12.7523, 4.1147, 0 angle : 0.188712
verticle:  -12.667, 4.04107, 0 angle : 0.0625573
verticle:  -12.5557, 3.99086, 0 angle : 0.0279765
verticle:  -12.4466, 3.94818, 0 angle : 0.0197823
verticle:  -12.3416, 3.92056, 0 angle : 0.158259
verticle:  -12.2107, 3.91634, 0 angle : 0.111906
verticle:  -12.1121, 3.9113, 0 angle : 17.8633
verticle:  -12.0988, 0.00704384, 0 angle : 15.2939
verticle:  -12.0895, -3.29836, 0 angle : 0.174713
verticle:  -12.2204, -3.29415, 0 angle : 0.100871
verticle:  -12.3471, -3.30499, 0 angle : 0.034264
verticle:  -12.4395, -3.32253, 0 angle : 0.0395647
verticle:  -12.5579, -3.36349, 0 angle : 0.139882
verticle:  -12.67, -3.42703, 0 angle : 0.170174
verticle:  -12.7499, -3.48974, 0 angle : 0.236563
verticle:  -12.8557, -3.57586, 0 angle : 0.266144
verticle:  -12.9293, -3.66115, 0 angle : 0.363156
verticle:  -12.9666, -3.76067, 0 angle : 0.357727
verticle:  -13.0339, -3.86855, 0 angle : 0.421973
verticle:  -13.067, -3.98313, 0 angle : 0.454565
verticle:  -13.0678, -4.09688, 0 angle : 0.452407
verticle:  -13.0687, -4.21063, 0 angle : 0.482545
verticle:  -13.0675, -4.3319, 0 angle : 0.487788
verticle:  -13.0361, -4.44482, 0 angle : 0.463094
verticle:  -12.9768, -4.54186, 0 angle : 0.421973
verticle:  -12.9496, -4.63972, 0 angle : 0.44279
verticle:  -12.8622, -4.72087, 0 angle : 0.402026
verticle:  -12.8071, -4.80285, 0 angle : 0.383084
verticle:  -12.7239, -4.86895, 0 angle : 0.399585
verticle:  -12.6105, -4.92668, 0 angle : 0.29074
verticle:  -12.5336, -4.97019, 0 angle : 0.30901
verticle:  -12.4266, -5.00535, 0 angle : 0.245493
verticle:  -12.3237, -5.02544, 0 angle : 0.214891
verticle:  -12.2229, -5.03801, 0 angle : 0.132704
verticle:  -12.0983, -5.01964, 0 angle : 11.875
verticle:  -12.0995, -8.28741, 0 angle : 0.300014
verticle:  -12.2304, -8.28319, 0 angle : 0.199792
verticle:  -12.327, -8.28568, 0 angle : 0.179137
verticle:  -12.4495, -8.31158, 0 angle : 0.121947
verticle:  -12.5679, -8.35253, 0 angle : 0.0395647
verticle:  -12.6799, -8.41607, 0 angle : 0.0279765
verticle:  -12.7598, -8.47878, 0 angle : 0.0442347
verticle:  -12.8657, -8.56491, 0 angle : 0.138476
verticle:  -12.9372, -8.65773, 0 angle : 0.199792
verticle:  -12.9765, -8.74972, 0 angle : 0.214891
verticle:  -13.0418, -8.86513, 0 angle : 0.275536
verticle:  -13.0749, -8.9797, 0 angle : 0.335718
verticle:  -13.0757, -9.09345, 0 angle : 0.359365
verticle:  -13.0745, -9.21473, 0 angle : 0.356083
verticle:  -13.0733, -9.33601, 0 angle : 0.39217
verticle:  -13.0419, -9.44893, 0 angle : 0.428872
verticle:  -12.9805, -9.55349, 0 angle : 0.402512
verticle:  -12.9211, -9.65052, 0 angle : 0.401538
verticle:  -12.8618, -9.74756, 0 angle : 0.417778
verticle:  -12.7744, -9.82871, 0 angle : 0.436559
verticle:  -12.659, -9.89397, 0 angle : 0.370094
verticle:  -12.5758, -9.96007, 0 angle : 0.338041
verticle:  -12.4687, -9.99522, 0 angle : 0.384613
verticle:  -12.3316, -10.022, 0 angle : 0.265408
verticle:  -12.2308, -10.0346, 0 angle : 0.261696
verticle:  -12.1041, -10.0237, 0 angle : 7.8231
verticle:  -12.1023, -13.1853, 0 angle : 42.4836

The only way I thought would fix this problem is a distance calculation combined with the angles that are bigger than a certain value. I know that is a bad solution. But I cannot think of any other way to calculate this.

This is how the angle calculation goes:

 inline float ofVec3f::angle( const ofVec3f& vec ) const {
ofVec3f n1 = this->normalized();
ofVec3f n2 = vec.normalized();
return (float)(acos( n1.dot(n2) )*RAD_TO_DEG);
 }

The distance between two points:

 inline float ofVec3f::distance( const ofVec3f& pnt) const {
float vx = x-pnt.x;
float vy = y-pnt.y;
float vz = z-pnt.z;
return (float)sqrt(vx*vx + vy*vy + vz*vz);
  }

I've used the OpenFrameworks library to realize this:

float dist = buildings[x].polygon[z].distance(buildings[x].polygon[z+1]);
        float angle ;
        if ( z < buildings[x].polygon.size()-1){
            angle  =  buildings[x].polygon[z].angle(buildings[x].polygon[z+1]);
        }
         if ( ( dist >  0.100)&& ( dist <  0.150)) {
          //Is part of ellipse
       }

Here's a github of the library

https://github.com/openframeworks/openFrameworks/blob/master/libs/openFrameworks/math/ofVec3f.h

Here are two screen shots of the points and the line

line

points

Here's one vector array of verts x,y x,y

-0.11878395,-106.14753 -0.13964462,-38.761494 0.0,0.0 -7.6293945E-6,113.11968 -96.88052,112.56717 -96.79668,85.153725 -97.843834,85.18742 -98.599945,85.107315 -99.58024,84.900116 -100.51039,84.51225 -101.42383,84.06417 -102.06295,83.562485 -102.65193,82.88013 -103.240906,82.197784 -103.77975,81.33476 -104.30187,80.41151 -104.325485,79.56175 -104.59001,78.64513 -104.5802,77.67491 -104.32949,76.77156 -104.07879,75.868195 -103.82809,74.96484 -103.35321,74.18856 -102.63742,73.47914 -102.17926,72.763084 -101.25601,72.24097 -100.59037,71.71221 -99.73398,71.43098 -98.63669,71.2166 -97.83043,71.11605 -96.8,71.14256 -96.859665,45.18112 -97.6492,45.22146 -98.66293,45.134716 -99.64322,44.92752 -100.57338,44.539658 -101.245926,44.158424 -102.12593,43.58989 -102.73163,42.96776 -103.303894,42.22518 -103.84273,41.36216 -104.14067,40.56599 -104.40518,39.649376 -104.412094,38.739384 -104.41901,37.8294 -104.409195,36.859184 -104.15849,35.955826 -103.90778,35.052475 -103.43291,34.27619 -102.71712,33.566765 -102.01806,32.917564 -101.33571,32.328587 -100.445885,31.92691 -99.57278,31.585457 -98.73309,31.364452 -97.68595,31.330748 -96.89641,31.290417 -96.790054,0.056350708 -96.71601,-26.386883 -97.76316,-26.353178 -98.77688,-26.439924 -99.51628,-26.580261 -100.46315,-26.907902 -101.35987,-27.416212 -101.99899,-27.917892 -102.84558,-28.606876 -103.434555,-29.289228 -103.732506,-30.0854 -104.27134,-30.948421 -104.53585,-31.86504 -104.542755,-32.77503 -104.54967,-33.685017 -104.53986,-34.655228 -104.28916,-35.558586 -103.81427,-36.33486 -103.59699,-37.117775 -102.897934,-37.766975 -102.456474,-38.422806 -101.79083,-38.95156 -100.8843,-39.41346 -100.2688,-39.761543 -99.41241,-40.04277 -98.58944,-40.203552 -97.78319,-40.30411 -96.78618,-40.157143 -96.79571,-66.299255 -97.84286,-66.26555 -98.615685,-66.285446 -99.59598,-66.49263 -100.54285,-66.820274 -101.439575,-67.32858 -102.07869,-67.83027 -102.92528,-68.51925 -103.497536,-69.261826 -103.8122,-69.99777 -104.33433,-70.92102 -104.59884,-71.83764 -104.60574,-72.74762 -104.59593,-73.717834 -104.58613,-74.68805 -104.33543,-75.5914 -103.84383,-76.42791 -103.36895,-77.204185 -102.89406,-77.98047 -102.195,-78.62967 -101.27175,-79.151794 -100.6061,-79.68055 -99.74972,-79.96178 -98.65242,-80.17615 -97.84617,-80.27671 -96.83245,-80.189964 -96.81836,-105.482315 -0.11878395,-106.14753

Other vector array

 0.0,46.766045 -5.8214893,46.69686 -5.820862,47.05351 -5.8475914,47.425262 -5.918213,47.749863 -6.0161915,48.08957 -6.1278477,48.43683 -6.283396,48.73693 -6.4526215,49.04459 -6.6794205,49.312645 -6.89254,49.573143 -7.1330166,49.848755 -7.4037094,50.069653 -7.6744003,50.290554 -7.988985,50.4643 -8.32011,50.57577 -8.621017,50.74196 -8.982357,50.79873 -9.330019,50.847942 -9.677681,50.897156 -10.011665,50.938812 -35.375645,50.81018 -64.38959,50.69822 -64.377785,49.620728 -64.35231,48.535683 -64.299484,47.435524 -64.20275,46.382523 -64.064995,45.30686 -63.91356,44.223648 -63.748447,43.132874 -63.525764,42.081707 -63.2894,41.022987 -63.025684,39.949158 -62.71807,38.922485 -62.38311,37.880703 -62.004246,36.886078 -61.611713,35.883904 -61.191822,34.86661 -60.758247,33.841774 -60.280785,32.86409 -59.759426,31.933561 -59.224392,30.995481 -58.67568,30.049845 -58.08307,29.151367 -57.476788,28.245333 -56.856827,27.331745 -56.162758,26.520025 -55.48522,25.646042 -54.777473,24.826767 -54.02583,24.05465 -53.304405,23.227821 -52.508865,22.502861 -51.69965,21.770344 -50.890438,21.037828 -50.051006,20.360025 -49.1979,19.674667 -48.314575,19.044018 -47.401035,18.468079 -46.504032,17.829878 -45.560276,17.30865 -44.602844,16.77987 -43.65909,16.258642 -42.671436,15.784572 -41.697464,15.318055 -40.693275,14.906249 -39.689087,14.494442 -38.654682,14.137346 -37.633957,13.787806 -36.58301,13.492973 -35.545746,13.205697 -34.478268,12.973131 -33.42446,12.748117 -32.340443,12.577815 -31.270102,12.415068 -30.18322,12.314583 -29.09634,12.2141 -28.006598,12.183435 -26.916859,12.152769 -25.840796,12.129659 -25.80352,9.967116 -25.811121,8.75754 -25.813,7.687599 -25.713875,0.20740414 -25.278425,0.25250435 -12.768033,0.054601192 -0.25477973,-0.073483296 0.0,0.0 0.0,46.766045
share|improve this question
2  
What have you tried? –  Andy Prowl Feb 18 '13 at 19:16
    
Because the distance is constant i thought a simple distance calculation between the points would be the best solution. Its totally inaccurate. That's the only way I could think of :( –  Martijn M Feb 18 '13 at 19:36
    
How would the vectors form an arc? Do you mean by putting them one after the other, one beginning where the last one ended, or when you plot them as points? Also, what is the "angle" column? –  Joni Feb 18 '13 at 19:53
    
Sorry I mean vertices. –  Martijn M Feb 18 '13 at 20:14
1  
if it is a continuous ordered path you might find the arc center of each 3 sucessive points, then look for clusters of centers that are near each other. whether this works or is better than a Hough transform depends on how noisy the data is. –  george Feb 19 '13 at 20:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A Hough circle fit or RANSAC circle fit would probably work for you; in image processing we use these algorithms to find circles, arcs, ellipses, and other shapes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hough_transform

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RANSAC

These algorithms work well with noisy data.

Gary Bradski's book Learning OpenCV has a section entitled "Hough Circle Transform" that runs a few pages. Although you might look at the OpenCV library itself, you'll probably find more straightforward descriptions of the Hough transform and RANSAC elsewhere.

[EDIT]

I wrote a quick Hough algorithm in C# and it worked well with your data. You could add random noise and it would still work. The core algorithm is about 100 lines of code with comments and spaces, and that's for a sloppy algorithm.

A portion of the output image from this algorithm is shown below with data points in white and Hough fit circles in red.

One standard algorithmic step I didn't implement is to filter data to eliminate all but the best circle fit when there are several reasonable circle fits with approximately the same center and approximately the same radius. That's why you see a double circle passing through the points.

Although a Hough algorithm might seem like overkill, what's nice is that it will work time and time again, it's reusable, it's easy to parameterize, and it will yield good results whether the data is clean or noisy.

Hough circles on sample data

NOTE: to simplify the implementation, I converted the float values for (x,y) to integers and normalized the values so that all (x,y) were positive. Something like this:

int x = (int)(100 * floatX + 1600);  //floatX = original X value in data
int y = (int)(100 * floatY + 3200);  //floatY = original Y value in data
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is to complex. It's just an array with X and Y values. Is there a way that is a littlebit less complex and just calculates a possible follow-up verticle? As you see the data is not that noisy. –  Martijn M Feb 19 '13 at 21:10
    
See my edit above. Your data looks just like the type of image for which we apply the Hough algorithm. It's possible to write a simple yet reusable version of the Hough algorithm; if my C# weren't a bit rusty it shouldn't have taken me more than about 10 - 20 minutes to write. (I write in C++, but C# is quicker for me for quick tests.) My concern with ad hoc algorithms to find circular arcs is that you would have to spend extra time developing methods to eliminate noise, delete outliers, etc. The parameters for Hough are straightforward and correspond to circle parameters such as the radius. –  Rethunk Feb 22 '13 at 6:08
    
Is there a possibility to share this code with me? Could you e-mail me this? –  Martijn M Feb 26 '13 at 14:33
1  
Coming back to this question. I've solved my problem with : docs.opencv.org/modules/gpu/doc/…. It's an fast and efficient algorithm that solved my problem. –  Martijn M Mar 1 at 8:52
1  
you did! Thanks! –  Martijn M Mar 5 at 18:18

this is not a complete answer but an illustration of my above comment, finding arc centers of sucessive points..by trial and error it works best if you look at wider spread points (1,5,9) , (2,6,10) , etc. (data here is a list of your x,y pairs)

arccenter[p_] := {xc, yc} /. 
   Solve[ { (p[[1]] - p[[2]] ).({xc, yc} - (p[[1]] + p[[2]])/2) == 
      0, (p[[2]] - p[[3]] ).({xc, yc} - (p[[2]] + p[[3]])/2) == 
      0 } , {xc, yc}][[1]]
pdata = Partition[data, 9, 1];
centers = arccenter[#[[{1, 5, 9}]]] & /@ pdata;
cc = Select[centers, Abs[#[[1]]] < 30 && Abs[#[[2]]] < 30 &];
Show[
     {Graphics[Point[#] & /@ data],
      Graphics[{Red, Point[#]} & /@ cc]}, 
      PlotRange -> {{-20, 0}, {-15, 15}}]

enter image description here

it should just take a little more effort to filter which centers are near each other. (recall that they too are ordered..)

share|improve this answer
    
Could you clarify this ansfer for me a littlebit? –  Martijn M Feb 21 '13 at 20:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.