Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to turn a simple multidimensional array into an even more simple array.

Turn this:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [id] => 123
        )
    [1] => Array
        (
            [id] => 456
        )
    ...
    [999] => Array
        (
            [id] => 789
        )
)

Into an array like this:

Array
(
    [0] =>  123
    [1] => 456
    ...
    [999] => 789
)

I'd like to do so without looping through with a foreach. Is this possible in PHP?

Here's how I can already solve it with a foreach loop:

$newArr = array();
foreach ($arr as $a) {
    $newArr[] = $a['id'];
}
$arr = $newArr;

I'd like to do it without looping. Can you help?

share|improve this question
4  
Why would you like to do it without looping? –  Waleed Khan Feb 18 '13 at 20:09
1  
avoiding a standard practice based on that 'premiss' is not efficient –  Dagon Feb 18 '13 at 20:13
1  
An O(n) loop is the least of your worries as a PHP developer –  KevinM1 Feb 18 '13 at 20:14
1  
@Ryan And you basically guarantee no one will be able to read your code at a glance. –  Waleed Khan Feb 18 '13 at 20:20
2  
Looking ahead, PHP may have an array_column() function (though probably not in PHP 5.5.0). $ids = array_column($array, 'id'); –  salathe Feb 18 '13 at 20:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could map it:

$arr = array_map(function($element) {
    return $element['id'];
}, $arr);

Since array_map probably internally loops, you could do it truly without looping:

$arr = array_reduce($arr, function($arr, $element) {
    $arr[] = $element['id'];
    return $arr;
});

But there's no reason to not loop. There's no real performance gain, and the readability of your code is arguably decreased.

share|improve this answer
    
array_map loops :-) –  Dagon Feb 18 '13 at 20:12
    
@Dagon Does array_reduce also loop? –  Waleed Khan Feb 19 '13 at 3:03
    
yup, one while loop –  Dagon Feb 19 '13 at 3:15

I admire your desire to have something approaching functional programming and implicit looping, but PHP is the wrong language for you. It does not express itself naturally in a functional style.

The reset function returns the first element in an array, so you can map that function over the array:

array_map('reset', $array)

However in PHP the fastest method is a simple for loop (not foreach, for). Here are a bunch of different methods of flattening. Only the functions containing for and foreach perform explicit looping and are included for comparison.

function flatten_for($arr) {
    $c = count($arr);
    $newarr = array();
    for ($i = 0; $i < $c; $i++) {
        $newarr[] = $arr[$i][0];
    }
    return $newarr;
}


function flatten_for_inplace($arr) {
    $c = count($arr);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $c; $i++) {
        $arr[$i] = $arr[$i][0];
    }
}


function flatten_foreach($arr) {
    $newarr = array();
    foreach ($arr as $value) {
        $newarr[] = $value[0];
    }
    return $newarr;
}

function flatten_foreach_inplace($arr) {
    foreach ($arr as $k => $v) {
        $arr[$k] = $v[0];
    }
}

function flatten_foreach_inplace_ref($arr) {
    foreach ($arr as &$value) {
        $value = $value[0];
    }
}

function flatten_map($arr) {
    return array_map('reset', $arr);
}

function flatten_walk($arr) {
    array_walk($arr, function(&$v, $k){$v = $v[0];});
}

function visitor($v, $k, &$a) {
    return $a[] = $v;
}

function flatten_walk_recursive($arr) {
    $newarr = array();
    array_walk_recursive($arr, 'visitor', $newarr);
    return $newarr;
}

function reducer($result, $item) {
    return $item[0];
}

function flatten_reduce($arr) {
    return array_reduce($arr, 'reducer', array());
}

function flatten_merge($arr) {
    return call_user_func_array('array_merge_recursive', $arr);
}

Here is the timing code:

function buildarray($length) {
    return array_map(function($e){return array($e);}, range(0, $length));
}

function timeit($callable, $argfactory, $iterations) {
    $start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
        call_user_func($callable, call_user_func($argfactory));
    }
    return microtime(true) - $start;
}

function time_callbacks($callbacks, $argfactory, $iterations) {
    $times = array();
    foreach ($callbacks as $callback) {
        $times[$callback] = timeit($callback, $argfactory, $iterations);
    }
    return $times;
}

function argfactory() {
    return buildarray(1000);
}

$flatteners = array(
    'flatten_for', 'flatten_for_inplace', 'flatten_foreach',
    'flatten_foreach_inplace', 'flatten_foreach_inplace_ref',
    'flatten_map', 'flatten_walk', 'flatten_walk_recursive',
    'flatten_reduce', 'flatten_merge',
);

$results = time_callbacks($flatteners, 'argfactory', 1000);

var_export($results);

On an oldish MacBook Pro (Core 2 Duo, 2.66 GHz, 8GB, PHP 5.3.15 with Suhosin-Patch) I get these results:

array (
  'flatten_for' => 12.793387174606,
  'flatten_for_inplace' => 14.093497991562,
  'flatten_foreach' => 16.71691608429,
  'flatten_foreach_inplace' => 16.964510917664,
  'flatten_foreach_inplace_ref' => 16.618073940277,
  'flatten_map' => 24.578175067902,
  'flatten_walk' => 22.884744882584,
  'flatten_walk_recursive' => 31.647840976715,
  'flatten_reduce' => 17.748590946198,
  'flatten_merge' => 20.691106081009,
)

The difference between the for and foreach methods is smaller on longer arrays.

Surprisingly (to me, anyway) flatten_merge is still slower than a plain for loop. I expected array_merge_recursive to be at least as fast if not faster since it's basically handing the whole job off to a C function!

share|improve this answer
    
You could just use reset instead of current, if you're worried about the status of the internal array pointers. –  nickb Feb 18 '13 at 20:33
    
Good idea. Changed. –  Francis Avila Feb 18 '13 at 20:35
    
fascinating. This is extremely helpful. This answer needs more upvotes! I look forward to testing on my own box soon. –  Ryan Feb 19 '13 at 1:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.