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If I have:

bool shuffle(string s){
    return next_permutation(s.begin(), s.end());
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){    
        string m = "abcde5";
    do {
        cout << m << endl;
    } while(shuffle(m));

I would get:

abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 abcde5 ... abced5

which is NOT what I want

However, if I do:

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){    
string m = "abcde5";
do {
    cout << m << endl;
} while(next_permutation(m.begin(), m.end()));  

I would get

abcde5 abce5d abced5 abd5ce abd5ec abdc5e abdce5 abde5c abdec5 abe5cd abe5dc abec5d abecd5 abed5c abedc5 ac5bde ac5bed ac5dbe ac5deb ac5ebd ac5edb acb5de acb5ed acbd5e acbde5 ... edcba5

which is what I want.

What's the difference? I looked up the next_permutation, looks like it returns a bool, so I am really confused now.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted
bool shuffle(string & s){
                    ^

You're passing the same string to the function over and over, because you're taking the string by value, and so not modifying the passed argument.

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Nice catch, thank you very much! –  HoKy22 Feb 18 '13 at 20:35

next_permutation is modifying your string to mantain the current state. With your intermediate function shuffle you modify a copy of the original string. To solve the problem try to define shuffle like this:

bool shuffle(string &s)
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Got it, thank you! –  HoKy22 Feb 18 '13 at 20:36

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