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I am doing a real_time simulation using a .cpp source code. I have to take a sample every 0.2 seconds (200 ms) ... There is a while loop that takes a sample every time step... I want to synchronize the execution of this while loop to get a sample every (200 ms) ... How should I modify the while loop ?

while (1){
          // get a sample every 200 ms
         }
share|improve this question
1  
Use a timer...? – Kerrek SB Feb 18 '13 at 20:51
    
How precisely does it need to be 200ms? Is 199.99 - 200.01 or 195-205 acceptable? How much work are you doing other than the make this happen every 200ms? – Mats Petersson Feb 18 '13 at 20:52
    
Do you do this on a real-time-System or on a normal Computer? It will be quite improbable to get this cycle to exactly 200ms. – bash.d Feb 18 '13 at 20:56
    
You need to tell us your error threshold as well as what OS you're on. – Ed S. Feb 18 '13 at 20:59
    
Use alarm(2) or ualarm(3) (part of POSIX, should be available everywhere) with gettimeofday(2), or perhaps usleep(3) (this is Linux-only, AFAIK). But be careful, what a signal handler is allowed to do is very limited, see signal(7). – vonbrand Feb 18 '13 at 21:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

what you are asking is tricky, unless you are using a real-time operating system.

However, Boost has a library that supports what you want. (There is, however, no guarantee that you are going to be called exactly every 200ms.

The Boost ASIO library is probably what you are looking for though, here is code from their tutorial:

//
// timer.cpp
// ~~~~~~~~~
//
// Copyright (c) 2003-2012 Christopher M. Kohlhoff (chris at kohlhoff dot com)
//
// Distributed under the Boost Software License, Version 1.0. (See accompanying
// file LICENSE_1_0.txt or copy at http://www.boost.org/LICENSE_1_0.txt)
//

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

int main()
{
  boost::asio::io_service io;

  boost::asio::deadline_timer t(io, boost::posix_time::seconds(5));
  t.wait();

  std::cout << "Hello, world!\n";

  return 0;
}

link is here: link to boost asio.

You could take this code, and re-arrange it like this

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

int main()
{
  boost::asio::io_service io;

  while(1)
  {
    boost::asio::deadline_timer t(io, boost::posix_time::seconds(5));

    // process your IO here - not sure how long your IO takes, so you may need to adjust your timer

    t.wait();
  }    

  return 0;
}

There is also a tutorial for handling the IO asynchronously on the next page(s).

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+1, very neat. I didn't know asio head timers – eladidan Feb 18 '13 at 21:19

To get absolute percision will be nearly impossible - maybe in embedded systems. However, if you require only an approximate frequency, you can get pretty decent performance with a chrono library such as std::chrono (c++11) or boost::chrono. Like so:

while (1){
    system_clock::time_point now = system_clock::now();
    auto duration = now.time_since_epoch();
    auto start_millis = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(duration).count();
    //run sample
    now = system_clock::now();
    duration = now.time_since_epoch();
    auto end_millis = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(duration).count();
    auto sleep_for = max(0, 200 - (end_millis - start_millis ));
    std::this_thread::sleep_for( sleep_for );
}
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This actually throws compilation errors. – Javi V Oct 1 '15 at 13:20

The offered answers show you that there are tools available in Boost to help you accomplish this. My late offering illustrates how to use setitimer(), which is a POSIX facility for iterative timers.

You basically need a change like this:

while (1){
          // wait until 200 ms boundary
          // get a sample
         }

With an iterative timer, the fired signal would interrupt any blocked signal call. So, you could just block on something forever. select will do fine for that:

while (1){
          int select_result = select(0, 0, 0, 0, 0);
          assert(select_result < 0 && errno == EINTR);
          // get a sample
         }

To establish an interval timer for every 200 ms, use setitimer(), passing in an appropriate interval. In the code below, we set an interval for 200 ms, where the first one fires 150 ms from now.

struct itimerval it = { { 0, 200000 }, { 0, 150000 } };
if (setitimer(ITIMER_REAL, &it, 0) != 0) {
    perror("setitimer");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

Now, you just need to install a signal handler for SIGALRM that does nothing, and the code is complete.

You can follow the link to see the completed example.

If it is possible for multiple signals to be fired during the program execution, then instead of relying on the interrupted system call, it is better to block on something that the SIGALRM handler can wake up in a deterministic way. One possibility is to have the while loop block on read of the read end of a pipe. The signal handler can then write to the write end of that pipe.

void sigalarm_handler (int)
{
    if (write(alarm_pipe[1], "", 1) != 1) {
        char msg[] = "write: failed from sigalarm_handler\n";
        write(2, msg, sizeof(msg)-1);
        abort();
    }
}

Follow the link to see the completed example.

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