Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So, I have this code, and I am trying to deallocate the array ppint at the end. I have tried using leaks with Xcode to figure out if it is working, but I don't quite understand it. Will doing this work?

delete ppint[0];
delete ppint[1];
delete ppint[2];
delete ppint[3];

Or is there something else that must be done?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <unistd.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int **ppint;
    ppint = new int * [4];

    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++ ) {
        ppint [i] = new int[4];
    } // declares second layer of arrays

    for(int i = 0, count = 0; i < 4; i++ ) {
        for(int j = 0; j < 4; j++ ) {
            count++;
            ppint [i] [j] = count;
        } //init part 2
    } // init array

    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++ ) {
        for(int j = 0; j < 4; j++ ) {
            cout << ppint [i] [j] << endl;
        } // print part 2
    } //print array
}
share|improve this question
1  
Any particular reason not to use std::vector<std::vector<int> > ? – piokuc Feb 18 '13 at 20:53
    
@piokuc I am working out of a book, that says to do it this way, only real reason, besides the fact that I haven't used vector. – MarJamRob Feb 18 '13 at 20:54
1  
Remember: Every new should have a corresponding delete, and every new[] should have a corresponding delete[]. – Cameron Feb 18 '13 at 20:55
    
go for the vector of vectors. You'll spend some time learning but it's worth it... – piokuc Feb 18 '13 at 20:55
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Close. You would have to use delete[] because you allocated each of them with new[]:

delete[] ppint[0];
delete[] ppint[1];
delete[] ppint[2];
delete[] ppint[3];

But of course, you should use a loop:

for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++ ) {
  delete[] ppint[i];
}

And then don't forget to delete[] ppint itself:

delete[] ppint;

However, in C++, we prefer to not mess around with dynamically allocated arrays. Use a std::vector<std::vector<int>> or a std::array<std::array<int, 4>, 4>. If you care about locality of data, try boost::multi_array.

share|improve this answer

My solution would be:

#include<iostream>
#include<cstdlib>

using namespace std;

int main(){

    int ** twod;
    twod = new int*[4];
    int counter = 0;
    /*init 2d variable and check whether we got the memory*/
    if ( twod == NULL) {
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    for (unsigned i = 0; i< 4; i++){
        /**/
        twod[i] = new int[4];
        if (twod[i] == NULL){
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        for (unsigned j = 0; j < 4; j++){
            counter++;
            twod[i][j]=counter;
        }
    }

    for ( unsigned i = 0; i < 4; i++){
        for (unsigned j = 0; j < 4; j++){
            cout << twod[i][j] << endl ;
        }
    }

    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        delete [] twod[i];

    /*and don't forget to delete the int* array as well.*/
    delete [] twod;

}

if you want to make sure you didn't make any memory errors use valgrind as well:

Valgrind is an excellent tool for detecting memory errors. In the output it show we made 5 memory allocations which were all freed. Valgrind can also show other kinds of memory errors like use of memory which you didn't allocate at all. Using memory that was not properly initialized before use, like i said an excellent memory check tool.

$ valgrind ./a.out
==18376== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==18376== Copyright (C) 2002-2011, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==18376== Using Valgrind-3.7.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==18376== Command: ./a.out
==18376== 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
==18376== 
==18376== HEAP SUMMARY:
==18376==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==18376==   total heap usage: 5 allocs, 5 frees, 96 bytes allocated
==18376== 
==18376== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==18376== 
==18376== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==18376== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 2 from 2)

And ofcourse as others are telling you make use of the std::vector for example you are coding in c++ not c.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right my code does indeed produce different output, but I tried to focus on the memory issues of the OP. – hetepeperfan Feb 19 '13 at 9:16
    
I adjusted my answer to get the same output as OP – hetepeperfan Feb 20 '13 at 10:06

You still need to delete the memory pointed to by ppint itself. You also need to use delete[] and not delete.

However, prefer a standard container over manual arrays.

std::vector< std::vector<int> > iv; // dynamic size
std::array< std::array<int,4>, 4> ia; // static size
share|improve this answer

You need one call to delete for each earlier call to new

for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++ ) {
    delete[] ppint[i];
}
delete[] ppint;
share|improve this answer
2  
re delete ppint;, something allocated with new[] needs to be deallocated with delete[]. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 18 '13 at 21:00
    
Thanks. Bit sloppy of me after correcting the other deletes – simonc Feb 18 '13 at 21:18

Something allocated with new[] needs to be deallocated with delete[]. But use std::vector instead of raw arrays and new. It manages the memory for you, automatically.


The following emulates directly your original code, and is shorter, cleaner and safer:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<vector<int>> v( 4, vector<int>( 4 ) );

    for( int i = 0, count = 0; i < 4; ++i ) {
        for( int j = 0; j < 4; ++j ) {
            ++count;
            v[i][j] = count;
        }
    }

    for( int i = 0; i < 4; ++i ) {
        for( int j = 0; j < 4; ++j ) {
            cout << v[i][j] << endl;
        }
    }
}

More in the spirit of C++ you could/should define a reusable matrix class, e.g.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

template< class item_t >
class matrix_
{
private:
    vector<item_t>  items_;
    int             width_;
    int             height_;

    int index_for( int const x, int const y ) const
    {
        return y*width_ + x;
    }

public:
    item_t const& operator()( int const x, int const y ) const
    {
        return items_[index_for( x, y )];
    }

    item_t& operator()( int const x, int const y )
    {
        return items_[index_for( x, y )];
    }

    matrix_( ssize_t const w, ssize_t const h )
        : items_( w*h )
        , width_( w )
        , height_( h )
    {}
};

int main()
{
    matrix_<int> m( 4, 4 );

    for( int i = 0, count = 0; i < 4; ++i ) {
        for( int j = 0; j < 4; ++j ) {
            ++count;
            m( j, i ) = count;
        }
    }

    for( int i = 0; i < 4; ++i ) {
        for( int j = 0; j < 4; ++j ) {
            cout << m( j, i ) << endl;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.