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If I make a call to an external web service and the user rotates the device, the Activity will restart (I know you can handle it yourself but this is not recommended). I know I can preserve the state using onRetainNonConfigurationInstance().

The question I have is what happens to the inflight network IO after the Activity restarts? Does it continue, is it suspended or killed?

I am rather new to Android (iOS person) so the restarting Activity is rather odd.

Some network calls we make could be restarted, but checking out for a purchase is not one of them. How do I handle this so that purchases still work correctly? Assume I would use Asynctask (though I realize there are other choices such as Executors).

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2 Answers 2

For network calls that need to maintain across activity restarts (e.g. purchase), consider using a service instead of doing it inside the activity.

If your connection is defined as instance variable inside the activity it will be destroyed/killed when the activity restarts.

Another alternative, but I would not recommend, is to implement an application class and maintain your connection there so it will be persistent as long as your app process is alive.

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I've been looking at service, like everything it seems complicated to deal with since it can be killed. Once we start the purchase web service call the ability to stop it from the client is unlikely to work as there are third party systems being called we have no control over. We could do a server side solution if we had to, but that's completely different than everything else we support. –  ahwulf Feb 18 '13 at 21:10
    
You can decrease the likelihood that your service is killed by 1) maintaing PowerManager and Wi-Fi *lock. Also, use only the resources you need so it does not cause the system to run out of resources. –  iTech Feb 18 '13 at 21:13
    
Services are much less likely to be killed than an Activities, and those decisions are partly based on how recently your app was used. I wouldn't worry too much about it, but as iTech mentioned, you can use a wakelock. –  Karakuri Feb 18 '13 at 21:20
    
Adding a more rest like front end to our purchase calls might be the easiest solution. Does involve more work of course. –  ahwulf Feb 18 '13 at 21:21
    
@ahwulf even if the service is killed, it doesn't matter if you handle it correctly. In your service serialize the state of transactions, and then recover when the app does restart. Or set up an AlarmManager to ping the server periodically. –  Kristopher Micinski Feb 18 '13 at 21:45

You should not be handling requests inside activities unless they are simple enough to fire off (i.e., do not require responses). The common use case is that you are interacting with a REST interface that you want to handle across multiple activities. The basic idea is to issue requests to the service and let it mediate the connection for you. Google IO 2010 had a good lecture that you can listen to.

Implementing the functionality inside an Application class is not recommended, as you will get strange behavior when your app is killed by Android when memory is tight.

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It's kind of hard to write an ecommerce application without doing commerce. We have an existing complex webservice layer (not REST exactly) that is used by all of our iOS apps and our mobile website. Writing a new one just for Android might make the dev time too long to justify it. –  ahwulf Feb 18 '13 at 21:15
    
@ahwulf what you're saying just reads "I'm don't think designing apps the right way is worth the cost, and I'd rather have something that only works most of the time." –  Kristopher Micinski Feb 18 '13 at 21:43
    
Not my design or my decision. This is a large body of decisions that predate me by a long time. –  ahwulf Feb 19 '13 at 19:32

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