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I have a program which has the user inputs a list of names. I have a switch case going to a function which I would like to have the names print off in alphabetical order.

public static void orderedGuests(String[] hotel)
{
  //??
}

I have tried both

Arrays.sort(hotel);
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(hotel));

and

java.util.Collections.sort(hotel);
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3  
What didn't work about those solutions? –  Brendan Long Feb 18 '13 at 21:40
    
Post the whole code. With the order you're doing everything. –  Maroun Maroun Feb 18 '13 at 21:44

6 Answers 6

Weird, your code seems to work for me:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        // args is the list of guests
        Arrays.sort(args);
        for(int i = 0; i < args.length; i++)
            System.out.println(args[i]);
    }
}

I ran that code using "java Test Bobby Joe Angel" and here is the output:

$ java Test Bobby Joe Angel
Angel
Bobby
Joe
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Here is code that works:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        orderedGuests1(new String[] { "c", "a", "b" });
        orderedGuests2(new String[] { "c", "a", "b" });
    }

    public static void orderedGuests1(String[] hotel)
    {
        Arrays.sort(hotel);
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(hotel));
    }

    public static void orderedGuests2(String[] hotel)
    {
        Collections.sort(Arrays.asList(hotel));
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(hotel));
    }

}
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You can just use Arrays#sort(), it's working perfectly. See this example :

String [] a = {"English","German","Italian","Korean","Blablablabla.."};
//before sort
for(int i = 0;i<a.length;i++)
{
  System.out.println(a[i]);
}
Arrays.sort(a);
System.out.println("After sort :");
for(int i = 0;i<a.length;i++)
{
  System.out.println(a[i]);
}
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The first thing you tried seems to work fine. Here is an example program.
Press the "Start" button at the top of this page to run it to see the output yourself.

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Foo{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String [] stringArray = {"ab", "aB", "c", "0", "2", "1Ad", "a10"};
        orderedGuests(stringArray);
    }

    public static void orderedGuests(String[] hotel)
    {
        Arrays.sort(hotel);
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(hotel));
    }
}
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java.util.Collections.sort(listOfCountryNames, Collator.getInstance());

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**//With the help of this code u not just sort the arrays in alphabetical order but also can take string from user or console or keyboard

import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Arrays;
public class ReadName
{
final static int ARRAY_ELEMENTS = 3;
public static void main(String[] args)
{
String[] theNames = new String[5];
Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.println("Enter the names: ");
for (int i=0;i<theNames.length ;i++ )
{           
theNames[i] = keyboard.nextLine();
}
System.out.println("**********************");
Arrays.sort(theNames);
for (int i=0;i<theNames.length ;i++ )
{
System.out.println("Name are " + theNames[i]);
}
}
}**
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