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I have a file that has a unique ID number on each line. I am trying to search a different file for the occurrences of these ID numbers and return the line where these id numbers are in the second file, in this case into an output file. I am new to programming and this is what I have so far.

outlist = []
with open('readID.txt', 'r') as readID, \
     open('GOlines.txt', 'w') as output, \
     open('GO.txt', 'r') as GO:  
     x = readID.readlines()
     print x
     for line in GO:
        if x[1:-1] in line:
        outlist.append(line)
        outlist.append('\n')

     if x[1:-1] in line:
        outlist.append(line)
        outlist.append('\n')
     print outlist
     output.writelines(outlist)

The files look like this: readID.txt

00073810.1
00082422.1
00018647.1
00063072.1

GO.txt

#query  GO  reference DB    reference family    
HumanDistalGut_READ_00048904.2  GO:0006412  TIGRFAM TIGR00001    
HumanDistalGut_READ_00043244.3  GO:0022625  TIGRFAM TIGR00001    
HumanDistalGut_READ_00048644.4  GO:0000315  TIGRFAM TIGR00001   
HumanDistalGut_READ_00067264.5  GO:0003735  TIGRFAM TIGR00001

The read ids match up with some but not all of the ids after READ...

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To fix the Attribute error instead of using readlines() do x=readID.read().splitlines() –  SuperFamousGuy Feb 18 '13 at 21:38
    
x is a list of lines, not just a single one. So, you have to do x = [line.strip('\n') for line in x] to strip all of them. But, as @SuperFamousGuy suggests, it's easier to just read them without the newlines in the first place. –  abarnert Feb 18 '13 at 21:48
    
Thanks that does help. I also noticed that it should be for x[] in line not GO and it works for a discrete value of the x list but it doesn't like the x[1:-1]. TypeError: 'in <string>' requires string as left operand, not list –  Marcus Feb 18 '13 at 23:25
    
Are you trying to match 00073810.1 or 00073810? Where is it supposed to match in GO.txt? READ_[ID].2, READ_[ID], or GO:[ID]? Can you see now how it's difficult to answer your question with so many missing details? :p –  wting Feb 19 '13 at 0:51
    
I Apologize again. The full number including the decimal should match the READ_[ID]. I am mining for the GO:# which I can isolate after I have the entire line in the output file. Thanks again for helping me out I am quite lost... –  Marcus Feb 19 '13 at 1:10
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/env python
# encoding: utf-8

import sys
import re

def extract_id(line):
    """
    input: HumanDistalGut_READ_00048904.2  GO:0006412  TIGRFAM TIGR00001
    returns: 00048904.2
    """
    result = re.search(r'READ_(\d{8}\.\d)', line)
    if result != None:
        return result.group(1)
    else:
        return None

def extract_go_num(line):
    """
    input: HumanDistalGut_READ_00048904.2  GO:0006412  TIGRFAM TIGR00001
    returns: 0006412
    """
    result = re.search(r'GO:(\d{7})', line)
    if result != None:
        return result.group(1)
    else:
        return None

def main(argv = None):
    if argv is None:
        argv = sys.argv

    with open('readID.txt', 'r') as f:
        ids = frozenset(f.readlines())

    with open('GO.txt', 'r') as haystack, \
        open('GOLines.txt', 'w') as output:

        for line in haystack:
            if extract_id(line) in ids:
                output.write(extract_go_num(line) + '\n')

if __name__ == "__main__":
    sys.exit(main())

I'm trading memory overhead for an O(n) solution rather than O(n^2).

I'm using regular expressions to extract the ids and go numbers, but it's brittle if the number of digits change.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried using this but the output file is empty –  Marcus Feb 18 '13 at 23:10
    
I forgot to strip newlines when comparing ids. –  wting Feb 18 '13 at 23:27
    
It is still empty –  Marcus Feb 18 '13 at 23:40
    
It works with my test input. At a certain point all we can do is provide possible solutions / general ideas; we can't do everything for you. Try to understand why something works or doesn't work. If you don't understand something, then break it down into smaller pieces and test it out yourself or ask questions. Generic responses like "it's still empty" is not helpful to you or me. –  wting Feb 19 '13 at 0:07
    
I apologize you are right. I am not sure why it isn't working for me ill try to mess around with it more. –  Marcus Feb 19 '13 at 0:33
show 5 more comments

Maybe something like this:

with open('readID.txt', 'r') as readID, open('GOlines.txt', 'w') as output, open('GO.txt', 'r') as GO:
    for ID in readID:
        for line in GO:
            if ID in line:
                output.write(line)
share|improve this answer
    
I tried it The output file is empty –  Marcus Feb 18 '13 at 23:28
    
Hmmm, could you post some input IDs and some data from GO.txt? –  Harpal Feb 18 '13 at 23:42
    
yes ill add some stuff to my original post –  Marcus Feb 19 '13 at 0:34
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If your files are small enough to fit in your memory.

with open('/somepath/GO.txt') as f:
    pool = f.readlines()

with open('/somepath/readID.txt') as f:    
    tokens = f.readlines()

# strip spaces/new lines
tokens = [t.strip() for t in tokens]
found = [(t, lno) for t in tokens for (lno, l) in enumerate(pool) if t in l]

You could then print your found list into your outfile.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this one but the i think the file is too big the GO file is 80Mb.. when i run this script it seems to just freeze up the terminal. –  Marcus Feb 18 '13 at 23:37
add comment
outlist = []
with open('readID.txt', 'r') as readID, \
    open('GOlines.txt', 'w') as output, \
    open('GO.txt', 'r') as GO:  

    for x, line in [(x,line) for x in readID for line in GO]:
        import re
        if re.search(x, line.strip) != None:
            outlist.append(line)
            outlist.append('\n')
    print outlist
    output.writelines(outlist)

This should work. Basically, you can pair all the lines in GO and ReadID with a single for loop.

What this code does is create a cartesian product of all the lines(meaning if you have 2 lines in GO and 3 lines in ReadID, then the loop will run 6 times), and then write all the common pairs to the Output file.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and the output is empty too Im not sure I fully understand this one –  Marcus Feb 18 '13 at 23:33
    
Updated the code with a fix, as well as a small explanation of what it does –  Achrome Feb 19 '13 at 0:42
    
Ok I see. I added a sample of the GO.txt and readID.txt in my original post if that helps. It seems that this would work if the files were of the same format, which they are not, the ID is nested in a word: _READ_[ID]. –  Marcus Feb 19 '13 at 1:18
    
Okay, I updated my post keeping that in mind. –  Achrome Feb 19 '13 at 1:26
    
Thank you. When I ran this it gave an error it looks like from the python folder here it is:File "GOlinegrabber2.py", line 8, in <module> if re.search(x, line.strip) != None: File "/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/re.py", line 142, in search return _compile(pattern, flags).search(string) TypeError: expected string or buffer –  Marcus Feb 19 '13 at 7:06
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