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I'm creating a quiz interaction, and after a few days of research I'm trying to determine the best way to declare my objects. There's a master anonymous function (which could be called Quiz, but there is no requirement for public methods) that contains a class definition for Scenarios that contain a class definition for Questions:

Quiz > Scenario > Questions > Answers (eventually)

I prefer the Immediately-Invoked ('iffy') model to enforce private/public, but I also require multiple instances, so I believe I should be using prototypes? I've placed the class definitions as private as they are only used by this interaction. Is this the best model?

JsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/QtCm8/

(function(quizData) {
    var scenarios = [];
    for(var s=0;s<quizData.scenarios.length;s++) scenarios.push(new Scenario(quizData.scenarios[s]));
    function Scenario(scenarioData) {
        console.log("New Scenario: " + scenarioData.title);
        var questions = [];
        for(var q=0;q<scenarioData.questions.length;q++) questions.push(new Question(scenarioData.questions[q]));
        function Question(questionData) {
            console.log("New Question: " + questionData.text);
            // Repeat pattern for future answers object
        }
    }
})({
    scenarios: [
        {
            title: 'Scenario1'
            ,questions: [
                {
                    text: 'What is 1+1?'
                }
                ,{
                    text: 'What is 2+2?'
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
});
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3 Answers

Consider packing your classes into objects. The following is a design pattern that I came up with. Since you have so many classes that rely on each other I thought it better to line them up into one object. Here is the code:

var quiz = {};

quiz.init = (function(data) {
    this.scenarios = this.questions = this.answers = [];

    this.data = {
        Question: data.Question.bind(this),
        Answer: data.Answer.bind(this),
        Scenario: data.Scenario.bind(this)
    };

    this.set_data = function(qas) {
        // fill the arrays here
        // Question, Scenario and Answer are now this.data.Question/Answer...
        // you can use a variable to shorten the names here
    };
});

var Quiz = function(data) {
    return new quiz.init(data);
};

var data = { // classes are defined here
    Question: function() {},
    Answer: function() {},
    Scenario: function() {}
};

var q = Quiz( data );

q.data.set_data(/* Big object literal goes here */);
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Interesting approach. Why do you pass in the 'data' (class definitions) when they're set to a global variable? If you took out the argument 'data' from '(function(data) {' then the binding would simply reference the global object rather than the local, yes? –  scader Feb 19 '13 at 17:34
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Personally, I like to use class definitions that return the properties that they wish to make public. Below is an example for your case. You could play around with the structure and find something that you like best, but it should give you some examples:

// Namespace
var q = {};

q.Quiz = function Quiz (data) {

    // Private code & variables
    var scenarios = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < data.scenarios.length; i++) {
        scenarios.push(new q.Scenario(data.scenarios[i]));
    }

    // Return public methods & values
    return {
        scenarios: scenarios
    };
};

q.Scenario = function Scenario (sData) {

    // Private inner class
    var Question = function (qData) {
        console.log("New Question: " + qData.text);
        return {
            text: qData.text
        };
    };

    console.log("New Scenario: " + sData.title);
    var questions = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < sData.questions.length; i++) {
        questions.push(new Question(sData.questions[i]));       
    }

    return {
        questions: questions
    };
};

var data = {
    scenarios: [
        {
            title: 'Scenario1'
            ,questions: [
                {
                    text: 'What is 1+1?'
                }
                ,{
                    text: 'What is 2+2?'
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
};

console.log(new q.Quiz(data));

Working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/5M8bp/

Alternatively, you get rid of the return statement and define public properties and methods using the 'this' keyword. For example:

q.Quiz = function Quiz (data) {

    this.scenarios = [];

    for (var i = 0; i < data.scenarios.length; i++) {
        this.scenarios.push(new q.Scenario(data.scenarios[i]));
    }
};

q.Scenario = function Scenario (sData) {

    // Private inner class
    var Question = function (qData) {
        console.log("New Question: " + qData.text);
        this.text = qData.text;
    };

    console.log("New Scenario: " + sData.title);
    this.questions = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < sData.questions.length; i++) {
        this.questions.push(new Question(sData.questions[i]));       
    }
};
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Thanks for your response--why did you code Questions as an inner class, while leaving Scenario as a root class? Overall, that's what I'm trying to figure out--if they should be root or inner definitions. And should I use prototype definitions so that methods for Scenario and Question classes are re-used for all instances? –  scader Feb 19 '13 at 14:30
    
Side note: eventually, I will update all classes with public methods (likely by returning object literals) so that I don't have to return the entire data object. –  scader Feb 19 '13 at 14:32
    
There is no perfect design, so you have to figure out what makes sense for your situation. Do you want to use the same questions in multiple different scenarios, or the same scenarios in multiple different quizes? If so, then they should probably be public classes. If not then maybe inner classes makes sense. My example was to demonstrate multiple different paradigms. –  Kris Feb 19 '13 at 22:38
    
I think prototype method definitions look much less clearer and intuitive since they are not encapsulated in a single class declaration; personal preference I guess. They also do not have access to private variables within the constructor method. As for the performance gain in object creation, I think that is probably a premature optimisation at this point. But if you are worried about it, you could try profiling both design choices and see the difference in your particular case. –  Kris Feb 19 '13 at 22:42
    
I wrote it all out with prototypes and would tend to agree that legibility weakened, and I also discovered what you now confirmed about access to private variables. I might drop the shared members requirement, due to premature optimization. Always trying to grow and learn, but maybe too much for now. –  scader Feb 19 '13 at 23:20
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First, there are no classes in Javascript, just objects. It is a prototype-based language (not class-based), and its functions are first-class objects. By the way, a prototype is an object, and every function you create gets it pointing to a new blank object. There is just a concept of "class" simulated using functions.

This immediate pattern (aka anonymous function) is very useful to provide a cleaner namespace, as you said. It also useful when there is a work that needs to be done only once, e.g. initialization code, so there is no reason to have a reusable named function.

However, if you need reusable members (e.g. a method), yes, it should go to the prototype. Adding common properties and methods to the prototype property, allows these common parts to be shared among all the instances created using the same constructor.

Maybe you are looking for the Module Pattern, which is a combination of patters like

  • namespace,
  • immediate functions,
  • private members etc.
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's why I said, "determine the best way to declare my object." ;) Overall, I prefer the Module pattern, but it doesn't include reusable members. I'm looking for a good combination of the two. –  scader Feb 19 '13 at 20:33
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