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I'm having problems understanding array identity in D.

Object s = null; // or new Object
auto a = [s];
auto b = [s];
writeln(a is b); // > false
writeln(a == b); // > true

This prints false, then true. I have no problem with ==, but in the D2 ref it is stated that

For static and dynamic arrays, identity is defined as referring to the same array elements and the same number of elements.

Which contradicts with the behavior I experience. a and b both have one element which is s, so they should be identical. Am I misinterpreting something?

Edit: I was in the wrong believe that same array elements meant they compared equal in terms of is, which kind of models identity comparison in D.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In D, an array is a tuple of a pointer and a length. The arrays are identical if they are the same length and point to the same array. The are equal if the contents of what they point to are the same.

In your example, a and b are equal, but not identical because they don't point to the same array. If they did, modifying a[0] would also modify b[0], but it doesn't.

If you had instead:

Object s = null;
auto a = [s];
auto b = a;
writeln(a is b); // > true
writeln(a == b); // > true

Then they'd both be true because they both refer to the same array. Also, in this case, modifying a[0] would modify b[0] as well.

The key misunderstanding here is that the array elements are not the same for each array, they just refer to the same elements:

            s
            ^
            |
       +----+----+
       |         |
      [0]       [0]
       ^         ^
       |         |
       a         b

If they were the same, you would have something like this:

            s
            ^
            |
           [0]
            ^
            |
       +----+----+
       |         |
       a         b

There's multiple levels of indirection here, which is what's probably causing the confusion.

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1  
I could live with that, but it says identity is defined as referring to the same *array elements* and the same *number of elements*. Essentially I'm fighting with the spec here. –  Sebastian Feb 18 '13 at 22:36
2  
Your arrays do not refer to the same elements. They refer to different elements that just happen to have the same value. a[0] is not b[0]. Modifying one does not modify the other, so they do not refer to the same elements. –  Peter Alexander Feb 18 '13 at 23:03
    
@PeterAlexander Probably worth explaining in answer explicitly that "same elements" is not "equal elements". –  Михаил Страшун Feb 19 '13 at 7:30
    
Actually the arrays refer to the same elements. a[0] is b[0] (even for a value other than null). ideone.com/ktHTZs. Of course, &a[0] !is &b[0], but don't think thats legal D... –  Sebastian Feb 19 '13 at 8:55
2  
See also rosettacode.org/wiki/Empty_string#D –  fwend Feb 19 '13 at 18:46

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