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I came across this nifty bash script, that is a little borked.

#!/bin/bash
function f() {
    sleep "$1"
    echo "$1"
}
while [ -n "$1" ]
do
    f "$1" &
    shift
done
wait

It sleeps for the seconds given by the number, then outputs that number. The lowest numbers wake up first.

I was thinking it could be improved by first dividing the numbers by the maximum number in the list, then running it through, and multiplying by the max as it exits.

Here's my first attempt:

#!/bin/bash

declare -a to_sort

function f() {
    sleep "$1"
    final_var=$(echo "$1*$2"|bc)
    echo "$1"
}
function max(){
for var in "$@"
do
    if [ "$var" -gt "$max" ] # Using the test condition
    then
        max="$var"
    fi
done
}

echo "$1"| read -a to_sort

let max_var = max to_sort

for i in "${to_sort[@]}"
do
    parsed_var=$(echo "$i/$max_var"|bc)
    f parsed_var max_var &
    shift
done
wait

Where am I going wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
...if you are trying to make sleepsort more efficient, I think you might need to rethink the approach... –  nneonneo Feb 18 '13 at 22:40
    
@nneonneo I'm trying to make it faster. I know it's a lost cause, but I want to fight on to help me learn more about bash. –  Pureferret Feb 18 '13 at 22:53

3 Answers 3

There were 7 issues in syntax and logic that prevented this from working, as commented below.

#!/bin/bash

declare -a to_sort

function f() {
    sleep "$1"
    final_var=$(echo "$1*$2"|bc)
    #Output result after multiplication
    #and skip decimals
    echo "${final_var%.*}"
}
function max(){
# Initialize max so we have something to compare against
max=$1
for var in "$@"
do
    if [ "$var" -gt "$max" ]
    then
        max="$var"
    fi
done
# output the max we found
echo $max
}

# Avoid assigning in subshells
read -a to_sort <<< "$1"
#This is how you assign the output of a command
max_var=$(max "${to_sort[@]}")

for i in "${to_sort[@]}"
do
    # Add scale to avoid truncating all to 0
    parsed_var=$(echo "scale=6; $i/$max_var"|bc)

    # expand variables
    f $parsed_var $max_var &
    shift
done
wait                            

Also note that GNU sleep handles fractions but many other OS don't.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1: Excellent work. It might be simpler to pass $parsed_var and $i (instead of $parsed_var and $max_var) which means you do not need to do the multiplication after waking. However, that was the OP's design decision which you respected. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 19 '13 at 0:55
    
@that other guy: I saw your answer right before I finished my answer, but I worked with it a bit so I posted it anyway :) I saw that you understand the use of the variable final_var, I didn't. –  244an Feb 19 '13 at 1:11
    
Wow! Thanks. That's a lot to go away with and digest. Running it quickly, it seems to only print the first number. I'll go away and look over the code and figure out if my shell is using GNU sleep or not. –  Pureferret Feb 20 '13 at 9:17

This line

echo "$1"| read -a to_sort

sets the value of to_sort in a subshell which no longer exists after the pipeline completes. To set the value of to_sort and be able to use it later, you need the read command to execute in the current shell. One possibility:

read -a to_sort <<< "$1"
share|improve this answer

I saw that @that other guy already answered, but I post this anyway...
Some in this is my personal way of doing things.
EDIT: forgot some lines when pasting in the code

#!/usr/bin/env bash

# I have learned that the above is prefered over "#!/bin/bash",
# to be more portable I think.


# Do this here (instead of 'echo "$1"| read -a to_sort' below (which was
# wrong anyway) because you chose to use "for i in 'to_sort'" below
# you can't use 'shift' there so you must use all arguments already here.
declare -a to_sort=("$@")
#debug: declare -p to_sort

function f() {
  sleep "$1"

  # This can be done in another way, see below
  # (and "final_var" is not used anywhere else)
  #final_var=$(echo "$1*$2"|bc)
  final_var=$( bc <<< "$1 * $2" )
  #debug: echo "\$1:$1; \$2:$2; final_var:$final_var"

  echo "$1"
}

function max() {
  res=0
  for var in "$@"; do
    # Tip: use (( ... )) when testing numeric values, no need for "$" when
    # using that.
    #if [ "$var" -gt "$max" ] # Using the test condition
    if (( var > max )); then
      # You can't set a return value for the function, echo at the en instead
      #max="$var"
      res="$var"
    fi
  done
  echo "$res"
}

# This is wrong (as @chepner points out)
#echo "$1"| read -a to_sort
# if used here it should be 'to_sort[0]="$1"', when using like this
# there is no need to use "declare -a ..."

# This is wrong
#let max_var = max to_sort
# - no space before or after "="
# - not necessary to us "let"
# - can't assign directly from a function
# Should be
max_var=$(max "${to_sort[@]}")
#debug: echo "max_var:$max_var"

for i in "${to_sort[@]}"; do
  # This is wrong
  #parsed_var=$(echo "$i/$max_var"|bc)
  # - as far as I know bc needs "scale" when divide (* bad english?)
  #   otherwise it's truncated to integer.
  # - nicer to use "command <<< text" than "echo text | command"
  parsed_var=$( bc <<< "scale = 3; $i / $max_var" )

  # You must have "$" here
  #f parsed_var max_var &
  f "$parsed_var" "$max_var" &

  # This is wrong here since you are not using the parameters
  # of the script anymore.
  #shift
done

wait

I leave the debug lines, when I run it with debug I got this:

-$ ./sleeping 1 2 3
declare -a to_sort='([0]="1" [1]="2" [2]="3")'
max_var:3
final_var:.999; $1:.333; $2:3
final_var:1.998; $1:.666; $2:3
final_var:3.000; $1:1.000; $2:3

EDIT 2: I changed the name used in the last section with the debug output. I stumbled over this:
http://www.talisman.org/~erlkonig/documents/commandname-extensions-considered-harmful
when reading a post here at SO (can't find it now). So I don't want to be guilty of causing anyone to use .sh for script-files :)

share|improve this answer
    
Like I said with 'that other guy' a lot of feedback thanks. This seems to run, but not sort when you have lots small and big numbers mixed in. I'll go away and think about it, though I suspect it's hit the minimum amount of sleep for some numbers and they end up poping out at the same time. –  Pureferret Feb 20 '13 at 9:20
1  
I don't understand exactly what you want to be sorted, if you want all the given numbers (parameters) to be sorted you can do this instead when setting to_sorted: ` declare -a to_sort=($(tr ' ' '\n' <<< "$@" | sort))`. I also added a comment regarding the name of the script file. –  244an Feb 20 '13 at 10:38
    
Hi, The idea behind sleepsort is that it sorts the number by sleeping. It's not efficient or quick but I thought trying to improve it might help me learn. So pre-sorting it (sorting it before it's 'sorted' by the program) doesn't make sense. –  Pureferret Feb 20 '13 at 13:06
    
Ok, now I'm starting to get a small idea of the use of the script :) You also saw the comment at the line with final_var=? I saw that @that other guy understand how to use that variable. –  244an Feb 20 '13 at 14:36

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