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So I know that in Scheme define is for dynamic scoping and let for static scoping, yet the following thing confuses me:

If I have

(let ((x 0))
  (define f (lambda () x))
  (display (f))
  (let ((x 1))
    (display (f))
    )
  )

It will display 00. So far so good. However, if I add an extra define for x like so:

(let ((x 0))
  (define f (lambda () x))
  (display (f))
  (define x 4)
  (let ((x 1))
    (display (f))
    )
  )

It will display undefined4. Why is this? Why does defining x after evaluating f affect the returned value of (f)? And why is the return value "undefined"?

It is also worth mentioning that binding f with letrec instead of define will also work:

(let ((x 0))
  (letrec ((f (lambda () x)))
  (display (f))
  (define x 4)
  (let ((x 1))
    (display (f))
    )
  )
)

Returns 00.

Note: I have used DrRacket with the languge set on "Pretty Big"

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2  
What do you mean by "define is for dynamic scoping in Scheme" ? BTW, unless you are required to use it for a course, "Pretty Big" is an obsolete dialect. –  Skeptic Feb 18 '13 at 23:12
3  
Scheme always uses static scoping, it's incorrect to state that "define is for dynamic and let for static scoping" –  Óscar López Feb 18 '13 at 23:16
    
I agree with Oscar: the premise in the question is either wrong, or is using the wrong term. –  dyoo Feb 19 '13 at 5:19
    
Define allows dynamic scoping. Look at the following example: (define x 1) (define f (lambda() x)) (display (f)) (define x 2) (display (f)) Displays 12 As oposed to: (let ((x 1)) (letrec ((f (lambda() x))) (display (f)) (let ((x 2)) (display (f)) ) ) ) which displays 11 –  user2085086 Feb 19 '13 at 7:00
1  
@user2085086: no, you are confusing the effect of two toplevel defines, the second of which is re-assigning the first. In some implementations of Scheme, redefinition will be treated as a set!. But this is troublesome and confusing. In fact, your first code snippet won't even compile in standard Racket, as the compiler will say up front that the duplicate definition is illegal. –  dyoo Feb 19 '13 at 17:31
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3 Answers

The issue you're experiencing in the second case is that (define x 42) makes x a variable for the entire scope in which it's defined. Now, although the variable is defined for the entire scope, its value is undefined until the actual (define x 42) line.

(let ()
  ;; up here, `x` is defined but has an undefined value
  ;; ...
  (define x 42)
  ;; down here `x` has the value 42
  ;; ...
  )

It's acting more like this:

(let ([x 'undefined])
  ;; ... up here, `x` is 'undefined
  (set! x 42)
  ;; ... down here, `x` is 42
  )
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Bun where goes let ((x 0)) at the top? –  Necto Feb 25 '13 at 5:02
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Your second and third code snippets are not Scheme (none of R5RS, R6RS nor R7RS). The <body> (of a let and others) is defined as:

<body> -> <definition>* <sequence>
<sequence> -> <command>* <expression>
<command> -> <expression>

and thus a define (which is a <definition>) cannot follow display (an <expression>). You are likely getting confusing results because the compiler/interpreter is incorrectly handling the expansion of 'let'.

Here is what a 'good' R6RS compiler does:

> (let ((x 0))
  (letrec ((f (lambda () x)))
  (display (f))
  (define x 4)
  (let ((x 1))
    (display (f))
    )
  )
)
Unhandled exception
 Condition components:
   1. &who: define
   2. &message: "a definition was found where an expression was expected"
   3. &syntax:
       form: (define x 4)
       subform: #f
   4. &trace: #<syntax (define x 4)>
> 
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What compiler do you use? –  Necto Feb 25 '13 at 5:05
    
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Case 1: the body of f binds to the outermost let in both invocations, resulting in 00 as static scope requires.

Case 2: I'm not very sure about this, but the internal (define x 4) shadows the outermost x=0 binding, and is in scope throughout even though it's textually after the call to f. Then some order of evaluation trickiness makes the first call happen before the new x binding is fully initialized, so it's "uninitialized". The second call in the inner let happens after everything is initialized, so 4.

Case 3: Now that we have explicitly put the letrec and the define in separate scopes, f obviously refers to the outermost let. The define does nothing here.

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