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I've been banging my head against this for a couple of days, tried a variety of approaches, none of them seem to work in a way that I can use...

Problem.

I am given an arbitrary byte stream. There is some semantic elements buried in the bytes. There are curly brackets, square brackets and brackets. These indicated three different things - {} is a no. of bytes range, e.g. {17} is 17 bytes. [] is a byte value, e.g. [90:95] is bytes x90, x91, x92, x93, x94, x95. () is byte value 'OR' option, e.g. (46|47) means either x46 or x47.

There are other grammatical constructs that I have to detect, "!", "*", "?" and ":".

An example bytestream: 524946(46|58){4}434452367672736E

I'm trying to filter it, so I get something like:

1 string 524946
2 token (46|58)
3 token {4}
4 string 434452367672736E

Once I have it split up, I can then process it further.

The closest I have come to getting it work (its ugly ugly ugly code...): http://pastebin.com/XLg2H0PW

I tried with some regex, but I could get it to not count the string bytes inside the grammatical units as normal string elements:

range_masks_list =  [(m_mask1.span()) for m_mask1 in re.finditer("\{([0-9]+|[0-9]+-[0-9]+|[0-9]+-\*)\}",sequence)] ## looks for {int}, {int-int} and {int-*}
byte_masks_list =  [(m_mask2.span()) for m_mask2 in re.finditer("\[[a-fA-F0-9]{2}:[a-fA-F0-9]{2}]",sequence)] ## looks for [a:b] where a and b are byte ranges
options_sets_list = [(m_mask3.span()) for m_mask3 in re.finditer("\(([a-fA-F0-9]{2})+\|([a-fA-F0-9]{2})+(\|([a-fA-F0-9]{2})+)*\)",sequence)] ## looks for regex or clauses e.g. (a|b)
string_chunk_list = [(m_mask4.span()) for m_mask4 in re.finditer("([a-fA-F0-9]{2})+",sequence)] ## looks for uninterrupted hex byte spans 

which would look like:

def do_fragmenter(self,sequence):
    """ converts the grep grammer normalised string into a set of fragments and offsets for sig population"""
    sequence = sequence.replace(" ","")
    range_masks_list =  [(m_mask1.span()) for m_mask1 in re.finditer("\{([0-9]+|[0-9]+-[0-9]+|[0-9]+-\*)\}",sequence)] ## looks for {int}, {int-int} and {int-*}
    byte_masks_list =  [(m_mask2.span()) for m_mask2 in re.finditer("\[[a-fA-F0-9]{2}:[a-fA-F0-9]{2}]",sequence)] ## looks for [a:b] where a and b are byte ranges
    options_sets_list = [(m_mask3.span()) for m_mask3 in re.finditer("\(([a-fA-F0-9]{2})+\|([a-fA-F0-9]{2})+(\|([a-fA-F0-9]{2})+)*\)",sequence)] ## looks for regex or clauses e.g. (a|b)
    string_chunk_list = [(m_mask4.span()) for m_mask4 in re.finditer("([a-fA-F0-9]{2})+",sequence)] ## looks for uninterupted hex byte spans 
    string_chunks = []
    string_chunks_len = []
    for pair in string_chunk_list:
        string_chunks.append(sequence[pair[0]:pair[1]])
        string_chunks_len.append(len(sequence[pair[0]:pair[1]]))
    print zip(string_chunks,string_chunks_len) 
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just taking into consideration the grammatical elements you have defined, you could maybe use something like this (replace the prints with the processing you need):

#! /usr/bin/python3.2

import re

a = '524946(46|58){4}434452[22:33]367672736E'
patterns = [ ('([0-9a-fA-F]+)', 'Sequence '),
    ('(\\([0-9a-fA-F]+\\|[0-9a-fA-F]+\\))', 'Option '),
    ('({[0-9a-fA-F]+})', 'Curly '),
    ('(\\[[0-9a-fA-F]+:[0-9a-fA-F]+\\])', 'Slice ') ]

while a:
    found = False
    for pattern, name in patterns:
        m = re.match (pattern, a)
        if m:
            m = m.groups () [0]
            print (name + m)
            a = a [len (m):]
            found = True
            break
    if not found: raise Exception ('Unrecognized sequence')

Yields:

Sequence 524946
Option (46|58)
Curly {4}
Sequence 434452
Slice [22:33]
Sequence 367672736E
share|improve this answer
    
I do not have enough upvotes. So elegant! thank you. –  Jay Gattuso Feb 18 '13 at 23:44
    
You are welcome. –  Hyperboreus Feb 18 '13 at 23:45

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