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Okay, I have this responsive navigation in place, and it is amazing: http://media02.hongkiat.com/responsive-web-nav/demo/index.html

Works on everything right down to a Crackberry. For the purpose of this demo, I'm just kicking it on when the user's viewport gets smaller than 480 or so (in other words, for the moment, if your viewport is bigger than that, you won't see a nav).

I'm writing because I am developing a site with a secondary navigation (a ul inside of ul, basically), but we do not show the secondary navigation unless the user clicks a primary. All in the interest in keeping a shorter page for usability. Here is a skeleton of what I'm dealing with:

http://email.gerarddesign.com/nav/index.html

HTML:

<nav class="clearfix">
  <ul class="clearfix">
    <li><a href="#">services</a>
      <ul>
        <li><a href="#">branding</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">communications</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">interactive</a></li>
      </ul>
    </li>
    <li><a href="#">contact</a></li>
  </ul>
  <a href="#" id="pull">Menu</a> 
</nav>

CSS:

/* Clearfix */
.clearfix:before,
.clearfix:after {
content: " ";
display: table;
}
.clearfix:after {
clear: both;
}
.clearfix {
*zoom: 1;
}

/* Basic Styles */
body {
    background-color: #ece8e5;
}
nav {
height: 40px;
width: 100%;
background: #fff;
font-size: 11pt;
font-family: 'PT Sans', Arial, sans-serif;
position: relative;
}
nav ul {
padding: 0;
margin: 0 auto;
width: 600px;
height: 40px;
}

nav li {
display: inline;
float: left;
}
nav a {
color: #FBA03A;
display: inline-block;
width: 100px;
text-align: center;
text-decoration: none;
line-height: 40px;
/*  text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #999; */
text-transform: uppercase;
}
nav li a {
border-right: 1px solid #576979;
box-sizing:border-box;
-moz-box-sizing:border-box;
-webkit-box-sizing:border-box;
}
nav li:last-child a {
border-right: 0;
}
nav a:hover, nav a:active {
background-color: #FBA03A;
color:white;
}
nav a#pull {
display: none;
}

nav ul li ul li {background: url("../images/arroworange.png") 33px center #F2F2F2 no-            repeat;
}
nav ul li ul li a {padding-left:25px;}

/*Styles for screen 600px and lower*/
@media screen and (max-width: 600px) {
nav { 
    height: auto;
}
nav ul {
    width: 100%;
    display: block;
    height: auto;
}
nav li {
    width: 100%;
    float: left;
    position: relative;
}

nav ul li ul li {
    width: 100%;
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    }

nav li a {
    border-bottom: 1px solid #576979;
    border-right: 1px solid #576979;
}
nav a {
    text-align: left;
    width: 100%;
    text-indent: 25px;
}
}

/*Styles for screen 515px and lower*/
@media only screen and (max-width : 480px) {
nav {
    border-bottom: 0;
}
nav ul, nav ul ul {
    display: none;
    height: auto;
}

nav a#pull {
    display: block;
    background-color: #FBA03A;
    width: 100%;
    position: relative;
    color:#fff;
}
nav a#pull:after {
    content:"";
    background: url('nav-icon.png') no-repeat;
    width: 30px;
    height: 30px;
    display: inline-block;
    position: absolute;
    right: 15px;
    top: 10px;
}



nav li {
    display: block;
    float: none;
    width: 100%;
}
nav li a {
    border-bottom: 1px solid #D4862F;
}
}

Please let me know if you can help me expand this amazing nav to be even more robust, THANK YOU in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Can you just include the relevant markup and CSS? Much more convenient than having to visit your site and poke around the source. –  MikeSmithDev Feb 18 '13 at 23:43
    
Are you looking to solve a problem or general advice? –  kjetilh Feb 19 '13 at 0:16
    
I'm looking to solve a problem. Sorry, first time here. =) –  Daniel Castady Feb 19 '13 at 15:30
    
@MikeSmithDev I've added the code. Thanks so much for your insight! –  Daniel Castady Feb 19 '13 at 15:44

2 Answers 2

Are you creating your own framework or just making a site? If the latter, don't waste time in solving problems already done well by existing frameworks. Try Bootstrap (from Twitter) which does a superb job in handling responsive design, including menus and submenus. I found Bootstrap very easy to use and it can be readily added to an existing website.

Here is the URL: http://twitter.github.com/bootstrap/.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, just building a site - but planning on adapting this nav for several future sites if it works out the way I am hoping. I will check out Bootstrap now, thank you! –  Daniel Castady Feb 19 '13 at 14:47

I really like the way this nav behaves, it's different than twitter bootstrap. you can read the css and see what they did.

They are good,But i don't think they have the "double layer" nav. like you want to do.

My suggestion would be to biuld a collapsible inside another collapsible.

Edit : i tried to look at it quickly , the way they call it is nested collapsible , here are some examples

Keep us updated on your progress.

you can open a github account and have peolpe contributing to this project :). would love to help when i have some time

share|improve this answer
    
I really like where you are headed with this, I'm not a jquery guy, is collapsing the inner ul tricky? It seems I need to write it into the js, which I would not know how to do. –  Daniel Castady Feb 19 '13 at 15:17

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