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I have the following wrapper class:

public class Wrapper
{
    public int Member;
}

In a separate class, I have the following:

public class ContainerClass
{
    private Wrapper data;
    public Wrapper Property
    {
        get { return data; }
        set { data = value; }
    }

    public void Foo()
    {
        Property.Member = 42;
    }
}

When Grid.Member is modified in Foo(), nothing happens (the setter is skipped). However, I can still do the following, for example:

    public void Foo()
    {
        Property = Property;
    }

and enter the desired setter. So my question is, why doesn't modifying the member of an object property call that property's setter?

share|improve this question
    
It's because you're not actually Setting the value of Property, but a member of it. To test it for example, in Foo() try doing Property = new Wrapper(){Member=42}; –  Kal_Torak Feb 18 '13 at 23:43
    
@Kal_Torak Ah, this explains it. However, (I hate to complicate things) in this case, I'm using this property in my ViewModel for WPF Data Binding, so if I were to use new, I believe I would lose my reference/binding. Suggestions? –  Joseph Feb 18 '13 at 23:56
    
I don't remember offhand how to handle that situation, no. I believe Member is going to need to have a Setter/Getter though, and the Binding will need to reference that property specifically –  Kal_Torak Feb 19 '13 at 0:15
    
Oh, and to answer your comment in the other answer, it may be possible to call ContainerClass.PropertyChanged("Property") from inside your Wrapper class. That'll depend on how your classes are laid out though, and on how you're implementing INotifyPropertyChanged –  Kal_Torak Feb 19 '13 at 0:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because you aren't setting the value of Property. Your code just invokes the getter of Property, then setting the value of the Member field (which would invoke the setter of Member if it were a property, which isn't the case here).

If you want to execute code when Member is set, you need to have

public class Wrapper
{
    private int member;
    public int Member
    {
        get { return this.member; }
        set 
        {
            this.member = value;
            DoSomething();
        }
    }
}

Or perhaps a more elegant solution would be to use events. The built-in INotifyProperyChanged interface gives you a pretty good template for this sort of thing.

using System.ComponentModel;

public class Wrapper : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private int member;
    public int Member
    {
        get { return this.member; }
        set 
        {
            this.member = value;
            this.OnPropertyChanged("Member");
        }
    }

    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
    {
      PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
      if (handler != null)
      {
          handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
      }
    }
}

public class ContainerClass
{
    private Wrapper data;
    public Wrapper Property
    {
        get { return data; }
        set { data = value; }
    }

    public void Foo()
    {
        data.PropertyChanged += data_PropertyChanged;
        Property.Member = 42;
    }

    private void data_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == "Member")
        {
            DoStuff();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Because you aren't modifying the reference. You are modifying the reference' member.

Say, for example, if I were to stand you in the corner of the room and say, "Hold this apple". If I come in and switch the apple with a banana.. I haven't switched you, so you're happy. But if I switch you out with someone else you'll complain that I'm replacing you.

..that is my analogy for this anyway.

Also, you've prefixed a class with I.. this is generally used on interfaces in .NET land..

EDIT: I realise that if I were to stand you in a corner holding a piece of fruit.. you probably wouldn't complain when I replaced you..

share|improve this answer
    
I would have used a pineapple –  devdigital Feb 18 '13 at 23:44
    
@devdigital My mistake :) –  Simon Whitehead Feb 18 '13 at 23:44
    
I know, it was all I could think of in a pinch... I will change it. –  Joseph Feb 18 '13 at 23:45

In the constructor of foo, you are setting the field of class Wrapper.

public void Foo()
{
    Property.Member = 42; // No property set, you are accessing a field.
}

In the second example, you are setting a property

public void Foo()
{
    // Setting Property "Property" to the value of "Property"
    // You should see both the getter and the setter called.
    Property = Property; 
}

I do not know what you are attempting to do, but maybe you wanted Wrapper to have a property too.

public class Wrapper
{
private int member;
public int Member
{
    get { return data; }
    set { data = value; }
}
}

Then the setter would be called on Wrapper.Member when you did Property.Member = 42

share|improve this answer
    
Right. Wrapper.Member is actually a property in my code, but it wasn't directly related to my question, so I cut it, for clarity. Ideally, I would like both setters (Property and Property.Member) to be called. But that may not be possible in this case. –  Joseph Feb 18 '13 at 23:51
    
You are correct, that is not auto-magically possible. Please vote up my answer. :-) –  Phillip Scott Givens Feb 19 '13 at 0:18

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