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I am trying to implement a simple echo client/server, over a Unix socket. (My ultimate goal is to exchange JSON data, but this example is for simplicity). I have no idea why the client process disappears into a black hole when it tries to print to the socket the second time.

server.pl :

use IO::Socket::UNIX;

my $socket_path = '/tmp/mysocket';
unlink $socket_path if -e $socket_path;

my $socket = IO::Socket::UNIX->new(
    Local  => $socket_path,
    Type   => SOCK_STREAM,
    Listen => SOMAXCONN,
);

die "Can't create socket: $!" unless $socket;

while (1) {
    next unless my $connection = $socket->accept;
    chomp( my $line = <$connection> );
    print $connection "$line\n";
}

client.pl :

use IO::Socket::UNIX;

my $socket = IO::Socket::UNIX->new(
    Type => SOCK_STREAM,
    Peer => '/tmp/mysocket',
);

die "Can't create socket: $!" unless $socket;

my $line;

print $socket "one\n";
chomp( $line = <$socket> );
say $line;

print $socket "two\n";
chomp( $line = <$socket> );
say $line;

say "three";

Expected output:

> ./client.pl
> one
> two
> three

Actual output:

> ./client.pl
> one
share|improve this question
    
would you give it a try with perl -w and put the output for us. maybe I might be able to help you. –  CPU 100 Feb 19 '13 at 0:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You put the $socket->accept call inside your while loop. After your server establishes a connection and receives some input from the client, the next thing it wants to do is establish a new connection.

Move the accept call outside the while loop

my $connection = $socket->accept;
$connection->autoflush(1);
while (my $line = <$connection> ) {
    chomp($line);
    print $connection "$line\n";
}

or, if you do want to accept more than one connection,

while (1) {
    next unless my $connection = $socket->accept;
    $connection->autoflush(1);
    while (my $line = <$connection>) {
        chomp($line);
        print $connection "$line\n";
    }
}

Your current solution will also likely be "suffering from buffering", so both the server and the client should set autoflush(1) on their socket handlers.

Now to handle simultaneous connections, the server would usually call fork after getting a connection, and handling that connection in a child process.

while (1) {
    my $connection = $socket->accept;
if (fork() == 0) {
    $connection->autoflush(1);
    while (my $line = <$connection>) {
            chomp($line);
            print $connection "$line\n";
    }
    close $connection;
    exit;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
The second idiom is the one I needed. Thank you. I think the server was not reading EOF from the client. As for simultaneous connections, there will be thousands of clients connecting, but I prefer to keep it simple and let them queue, rather than forking more servers. Simple request/response, and no need for me to maintain state for each connection. –  Anomaly Feb 19 '13 at 0:52

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