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Are there any negatives to creating huge strings? For instance, if we're reading in text from a potentially huge text file:

while (scanner.hasNext()) {
  someString += scanner.next();
}
// do something cool with someString

Would processing the file line by line be (generally) a better solution, and why?

Thanks

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6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Streaming vs not

When you can stream, you can handle files of any size (assuming you really can forget all the data you've already seen). You end up with a naturally O(n) complexity, which is a very good thing. You don't break by running out of memory.

Streaming is lovely... but doesn't work in every scenario.

StringBuilder

As it seems there's been a certain amount of controversy over the StringBuilder advice, here's a benchmark to show the effects. I had to reduce the size of the benchmark in order to get the slow version to even finish in a reasonable time.

Results first, then code. This is a very rough and ready benchmark, but the results are dramatic enough to make the point...

c:\Users\Jon\Test>java Test slow
Building a string of length 120000 without StringBuilder took 21763ms

c:\Users\Jon\Test>java Test fast
Building a string of length 120000 with StringBuilder took 7ms

And the code...

class FakeScanner
{
    private int linesLeft;
    private final String line;

    public FakeScanner(String line, int count)
    {
        linesLeft = count;
        this.line = line;
    }

    public boolean hasNext()
    {
        return linesLeft > 0;
    }

    public String next()
    {
        linesLeft--;
        return line;
    }
}

public class Test
{    
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        FakeScanner scanner = new FakeScanner("test", 30000);

        boolean useStringBuilder = "fast".equals(args[0]);

        // Accurate enough for this test
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

        String someString;
        if (useStringBuilder)
        {
            StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
            while (scanner.hasNext())
            {
                builder.append(scanner.next());
            }
            someString = builder.toString();
        }
        else
        {
            someString = "";     
            while (scanner.hasNext())
            {
                someString += scanner.next();
            }        
        }
        long end = System.currentTimeMillis();

        System.out.println("Building a string of length " 
                           + someString.length()
                           + (useStringBuilder ? " with" : " without")
                           + " StringBuilder took " + (end - start) + "ms");
    }
}
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Compile this! It turns into StringBuilder! –  Stefan Kendall Sep 29 '09 at 20:38
    
I am not sure why this has been downvoted - he is correct. –  aperkins Sep 29 '09 at 20:40
2  
@iftrue: It will turn it into a use of StringBuilder and then a call to toString. –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '09 at 20:41
    
but this is beginner question, its just sad that he answers that. –  IAdapter Sep 29 '09 at 20:42
2  
@iftrue: See yoda.arachsys.com/java/stringbuffer.html –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '09 at 20:42

I believe that creates a new String object every time you do a +=. Use StringBuilder instead.

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1  
Wrong. Compile the code and look at the bytecode. See my response. –  Stefan Kendall Sep 29 '09 at 20:36
2  
Depends on the compiler. Most compilers only replace with StringBuilder if it's on the same line (e.g. "123" + "456" + "789". –  Cat Man Do Sep 29 '09 at 20:40
    
Not what I've seen. I had an article somewhere, but I lost it. –  Stefan Kendall Sep 29 '09 at 20:45
3  
@iftrue: How about we benchmark it? You seem utterly convinced that StringBuilder is useless, despite the compiled code clearly creating a new StringBuilder on each iteration and calling toString in each iteration. Time for a test... –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '09 at 20:46
    
Good comment about the compiler optimization. However, I still think this answer is valid - IMHO it is better not to rely unnecessarily on implementation specific compiler optimizations. –  hrnt Sep 29 '09 at 20:46

Use the StringBuilder. Your approach is creating potentially thousands of throw-away objects. Strings are immutable objects, meaning that once you create one you can't change it ... you can only create a new String and assign the reference to your current instance. StringBuilder will be hundreds if not thousands of times more effecient in speed and memory.

http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/StringBuilder.html

Most Java compilers however will now optimize things out for you, but it's a good practice to code right upfront.

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2  
StringBuilder is even better though - no synchronization. –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '09 at 20:36
    
Wrong. Compile the code and look at the bytecode. You get buffer or builder, depending on teh situation. –  Stefan Kendall Sep 29 '09 at 20:36
1  
@iftrue: Wrong. See the replies on your answer. –  T.J. Crowder Sep 29 '09 at 20:53
    
I don't think (Java -> bytecode) compilers optimisation will do much with the code presented. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 29 '09 at 20:53

As Jon Skeet said, streaming is a more robust way of handling data. Also, Strings have a finite size of Max_INT characters - so if your files are likely to be larger than that, you should consider handling the data streaming if at all possible.

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What if the input is larger than the system's memory (e.g. the input is being generated by another computer over an HTTP connection)? If you process one line at a time, you are always making progress, and you will eventually process the entire input, assuming that the input is finite. However, if you wait to see the entire input, before performing any processing, you will run out of memory and break.

In general, it is good to process data in a streaming manner. This also applies to performing processing using iterators rather than random-access, when possible. It will allow your program to scale up to very large input sizes, and it also allows your program to be pipelined (i.e. another program can start processing your programs output, while your program is still in the middle of processing its own input). In this day and age of large media transmissions between many different computers, this is almost always a good idea to support.

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A couple of extra points:

  1. If you read a very large amount of data into StringBuilder and then call toString() the JVM will temporarily require double the amount of char[] storage space during the conversion. If you can process the data as a CharSequence (StringBuilder implements CharSequence) you can avoid this.
  2. Another thing you try if you do need to read all data into memory is to represent the String as a list of words (i.e. List<String>) and call intern() on each word. If the data contains large numbers of repeated words this will represent a significant saving in memory.
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