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I'm trying to compare an integer and a floating point in bash script. I have tried the following:

if [ $? -eq 4.189 ];

which doesn't work because it wants 4.189 to be an integer, and

if [ $? = 4.186 ];

because I thought that that might work. I also tried bc. Any tips on how to do this? Bash newbie here. Thanks so much.

Note: $? is the output from an executable that calculates the volume of a sphere.

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What exactly do you want to do? If $? is an integer, it is never equal to 4.186 –  BeniBela Feb 19 '13 at 0:55
    
please go through the link : stackoverflow.com/questions/9939546/… –  user1428716 Feb 19 '13 at 0:56
    
Oh, you're right. I guess the output is not an integer. -eq expects an integer, I just need a way to compare the output value to 4.189. Sorry, ignorant question. –  AHalbert Feb 19 '13 at 0:56
    
linuxjournal.com/content/floating-point-math-bash they used bc –  eicto Feb 19 '13 at 1:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This will work

#!/bin/bash
volume=4.189
if [[ $(echo "$volume == 4.189" | bc) -eq "1" ]]; then
    echo Equal
else
    echo Not Equal
fi

or simply put the literal in quotes

#!/bin/bash
volume=4.189
if [[ $volume == "4.189" ]]; then
    echo Equal
else
    echo Not Equal
fi

Notice that of the two ways I showed to compare floating point the preferred is to use bc, it will tell you that 4.1890 is equal to 4.189 whereas the second method is a dumb string compare, they will compare unequal.

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Could it be done with if [[ $? == "4.189" ]];? –  AHalbert Feb 19 '13 at 1:03
    
Ok - so if I use your code, they all come out as correct, and if my code is used, they all come out as incorrect. –  AHalbert Feb 19 '13 at 1:06
    
You are using $? which is –  amdn Feb 19 '13 at 1:13
    
the output from the executable, which calculates the volume of a inputted radius. we have to use it because of the sample code that was given to us by the professor. –  AHalbert Feb 19 '13 at 1:16
    
You are using $? which is the return code from a command, see stackoverflow.com/questions/6834487/… That will always be an integer. The return code is not a good way to do this, first because it is meant to indicate an error condition when not zero and second because you can't pass fractional digits. –  amdn Feb 19 '13 at 1:16

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