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I'm developing a C++ project in Visual Studio 2012 that uses driver code to interface with an open DMX box(ENTTEC DMX USB PRO). Thus far, I've been writing code and compiling as an EXE so I could use main() to run unit tests.

I want to port this over so that I have the device interface code that compiles down to a .DLL, then a separate source file that contains C++ code to compile an EXE that links to the DLL and makes calls to the functions to run the tests.

Essentially, when I go to debug, is there a way to setup Visual Studio 2012 to generate a .DLL and an .exe making calls to the .DLL and run the .exe automatically all in one step? I'm new to Visual Studio and find it quite confusing.

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Yes. Setup two projects in your solution: One for your main code (generating a DLL) and one for your executable, where your unit tests reside. Then look under project dependencies (under the Project menu on VS2010, not sure about 2012) to make the EXE dependent on the DLL (that will make sure the EXE rebuilds/relinks when necessary).

Right-click on the EXE project in the Solution Explorer and select Properties. There you can setup the includes/linker to get to your header/lib file, if necessary (it might not be necessary if you use LoadLibrary explicitly or something, but I'm guessing you're not doing that).

Now in the project settings for the EXE under build events, add a post-build event that runs your tests. Note that if your EXE returns something other than 0 from main(), VS can report that as an error in the build.

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"Right-click on the EXE project in the Solution Explorer and select Properties. There you can setup the includes/linker to get to your header/lib file, if necessary", can you explain how/where to do this exactly? –  John Lotacs Feb 19 '13 at 2:42
    
In the C/C++ properties on the general tab, you add include directories. There you'd make sure the folder with your header is listed -- could be a full or relative path or use macros like $(SolutionDir). Then, under the linker settings, under general (about half way down), append "Additional library directories" with yours. Then in the Linker's Inputs page, make sure the .lib corresponding to your DLL is listed. Again, make use of macros to assist, and make sure you do it for both Debug and Release, pointing to the proper output folder for each. –  metal Feb 19 '13 at 2:51

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