Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wondering why I'm getting this error. It's for an assignment where i'm to convert from an integer to a hex value. I call this helper conversion function when I mod the integer value by 16. (concatenated with the integer value which I then divide by 16 in a recursive call) Here is my code.

(I won't post original function as it is for assignment, let me know if this is not descriptive enough)

    changeToHex :: Integer -> String
    --main function

    toHex :: Integer -> String
    toHex x
        |x == 0         = '0'
        |x == 1         = '1'
        |x == 2         = '2'
        |x == 3         = '3'
        |x == 4         = '4'
        |x == 5         = '5'
        |x == 6         = '6'
        |x == 7         = '7'
        |x == 8         = '8'
        |x == 9         = '9'
        |x == 10        = 'A'
        |x == 11        = 'B'
        |x == 12        = 'C'
        |x == 13        = 'D'
        |x == 14        = 'E'
        |x == 15        = 'F'
share|improve this question
    
can you post the whole error message? –  גלעד ברקן Feb 19 '13 at 3:30

1 Answer 1

Using single quotes ('F') gives you a Char literal. For a String literal, which is in fact a list of Char values, you should use double quotes ("F").

Since String is an alias for [Char], if you want to convert from a Char to a String, you can merely wrap the Char in a one-element list. A function to do so might look like:

stringFromChar :: Char -> String
stringFromChar x = [x]

This is typically written inline, as (:[]), equivalent to \x -> (x : []) or \x -> [x].

As an aside, you can simplify your code considerably, using for example the Enum typeclass:

toHexDigit :: Int -> Char
toHexDigit x
  | x < 0 = error "toHex: negative digit value"
  | x < 10 = toEnum $ fromEnum '0' + x
  | x < 15 = toEnum $ fromEnum 'A' + x - 10
  | otherwise = error "toHex: digit value too large"

More generally, any time you have a function like:

f x
  | x == A = ...
  | x == B = ...
  | x == C = ...
  ...

You can convert that to a less repetitious, more efficient equivalent with case:

f x = case x of
  A -> ...
  B -> ...
  C -> ...
  ...
share|improve this answer
    
Okay that's what I thought but then I get an error in my main function saying "couldn't match expected type 'Char' with actual type 'String' ". So odd, I don't mention Char anywhere... –  john stamos Feb 19 '13 at 2:29
1  
@johnstamos: String is defined in terms of Char, as type String = [Char]. –  Jon Purdy Feb 19 '13 at 2:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.