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I am from C++ background and learning Java.

In C++ we can not initialize a non static member inside the class definition as shown below:

#include <iostream>


using namespace std;

class myClass{
    int i=10;//Error

    public:
    void set_i()
    {
        i=10;
        }
    void get_i()
        {
            cout << i << endl;
        }
};


int main()
{

 myClass ob;
 ob.set_i();
 ob.get_i();


 return 0;
    }

Throws compilation error:

$ g++ -Wall Test.cpp -o Test
Test.cpp:8: error: ISO C++ forbids initialization of member `i'
Test.cpp:8: error: making `i' static
Test.cpp:8: error: ISO C++ forbids in-class initialization of non-const static member    `i'

But it is allowed in Java:

class Test{

    private int i=10; //No Error

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {

        Test t= new Test();
        System.out.println(t.i);
        }
    }

It compiles and runs successfully in JAVA.

Can someone tell me the reason for this difference?

Thanks

@Those who flagged this question as un-useful. This is a valid question:

Based on below reference: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/lnxpcomp/v8v101/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.xlcpp8l.doc%2Flanguage%2Fref%2Fcplr038.htm

"Once you define a static data member, it exists even though no objects of the static data member's class exist."

It means then: C++ does not allow this because there is no instance created for that data variable unless an object of the class is created first. If that is not the case with java, it means an instance of a data member does exist even if no object of that class has been created.

And also Java takes C++ as base, so there must be some concrete reason to make this difference between the two languages.

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closed as not constructive by Alok Save, TheWhiteRabbit, Sudarshan, sgarizvi, Ben Voigt Feb 19 '13 at 5:28

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9  
For a start because both are different languages. It makes non sense to compare apples and oranges. Also, You can initialize non-static members inside the class since C++11. –  Alok Save Feb 19 '13 at 3:34
3  
and secondly, private int i=10; is not static in java. To make it static, you need to explicitly mention that. private static int=10; –  R.J Feb 19 '13 at 3:35
1  
there's no real strong reason, see answers in stackoverflow.com/questions/12757501/… –  irreputable Feb 19 '13 at 3:52
1  
Gaurav K: no it doesn't mean that a data member does exist before an object has been created. It just means that for ease of use, Java allows you to specify there the initial value of a member at object creation time, as if you were doing it in a constructor, except that it will apply to all constructors, and before the constructor is run. Nothing non-static will be initialized before an object is created. To verify this, declare i as int i = foo(); and you'll see foo() if only called when object is created (and each time an object is created). –  Cyrille Ka Feb 19 '13 at 3:53
2  
@GauravK: No, that's not the reason C++ does(did) not allow it. The reason C++ did not allow it is either because nobody thought of it, or not enough influential people thought it an important enough feature at the time. For C++11(and for Java), somebody did think of it, and enough influential people thought it was important enough to add to the language. –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 19 '13 at 3:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

in c++, try the following

#include <iostream>


using namespace std;

class myClass{

    int i;

    public:


        myClass()
        {
            i=10;
        }
    void set_i()
    {
        i=10;
        }
    void get_i()
        {
            cout << i << endl;
        }

};

int main()
{

 myClass ob;
 ob.set_i();
 ob.get_i();

 system("pause");
 return 0;

    }

Now check the following

#include <iostream>


using namespace std;

class myClass{

    int static const i=0;

    public:


        myClass()
        {
            //i=10;
        }
    void set_i()
    {
       // i=10;
        }
    void get_i()
        {
            cout << i << endl;
        }

};

int main()
{

 myClass ob;
 ob.set_i();
 ob.get_i();

 system("pause");
 return 0;

    }

Why the above is working? Simple, in C++ only static const integral data members can be initialized within a class

So why it works in Java? Because that is Java! Not C++ ! I agree with your argument, "Java is based on C++". All Right, but that is not C++, isn't it? There is a very big difference between Java and C++, do not try to compare them and expect to work them in the exact same way. It won't happen, in most of the cases.

In java, it applies a default value of "0" to all the integer types, but as you know C++ don't (unless otherwise it is "static"). In other words, Java calls to their own classes(actually, class constructors) and initialize them to 0. It happens as soon as you create a data type int. Java does the same for its primitive types as well. That might be the reason we are allowed to give a value to a variable outside of any method. Refer to the following doc to learn more

http://www.java2s.com/Tutorial/SCJP/0020__Java-Source-And-Data-Type/AutomaticInitializationDefaultValuesforPrimitiveTypes.htm

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