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I've a problem that requires me to write a program that finds a solution for a pair of 1st degree simultaneous equations. I have to test all the values of x and y exhaustively to find the integer solution. The coefficients, A, B, and C, of both equations are in a data text file called "input.txt".

The text file has the following data:

1 0 99
0 2 -100

Below is my program:

#include <stdio.h>;

#define FILENAME "input.txt"

int main() {
    int A, B, C, x, y;
    FILE *input;
    input = fopen(FILENAME,"r");
    fscanf(input,"%d%d%d", &A,&B,&C);

    for(x = -100; x <= 100; x++)
        for(y = -100; y <= 100; y++)
            if(A*x+B*y==C){
                fscanf(input,"%d%d%d", &A,&B,&C);
                if(A*x+B*y==C)
                    printf("X=%d, Y=%d\n", x, y);
            }

    return 0;
}

When I compile and run the program, I get

X=99, Y=-50
X=100, Y=-50

Clearly, the program has some errors. What are they?

Also, if I want to print a message that says the solution cannot be found in the range [-100, 100] only once, how should I insert this printf function into the program?

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4 Answers 4

It's been a while since I've done c-style file I/O, but there are a couple obvious errors I noticed quickly:

  • You should verify the file is opened
  • You should verify fscanf reads the expected number of items each time
  • You might need spaces between the %d format specifiers (not sure on this one)
  • You should not read the second set of parameters into the same variables as the first set
  • You should only read the second set of parameters once (not conditionally in the loop)

Also, why are you required to use nested loops? There are much better ways to attack the problem.

Edit: Is the provided output even from the example code? How does Y get the value -50?

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I made a mistake with my input: the x and y should start from -100. But even correcting it, I still get the output I shown. Btw, this is a homework question and it sets the requirements as such. What I am trying to do is to scan the first set of coefficient first, 1 0 99, and using loops to find the set of x's and y's that satisfy the first equation. Next, I scan the second set of coefficient to assign A, B and C to this second set. Then, I print out the x and y that satisfy the second equation. But, I am still unsuccessful as you can see the output has 2 sets of x's and y's. –  electroniclearner Feb 19 '13 at 5:09
    
+1 Points 4 and 5 are crucial. 1,2 are useful too. –  Aki Suihkonen Feb 19 '13 at 7:30
    
I suppose I should have guessed this was a homework problem. Have you tried running through the program with a debugger and comparing your expectations to what actually happens? What do you think will happen if you find a solution to the first equation that isn't a solution to the second? –  jerry Feb 19 '13 at 13:46

There are a few problems. First it does get the correct answer as: 99 x 1 + -50 x 0 == 99

But then, having found one answer, it has over-written your original A,B,C values and matches up any value of x. It then reads past the end of file and so I am not sure of the content of A, B and C after that.

You should stop searching after you find one answer.

A better way to find it is this:

Determinant = A1 * B2 - A2 * B1;
x = (C1 * B2 - C2 * B1) / Determinant;
y = (C2 * A1 - C1 * A2) / Determinant;

If the determinant is zero then the equations are parallel.

Of course most of your answers will not be integers and so you may like to use floats.

I am a big fan of closing files when they are finished.

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If you are only after integer results you can use the modulus operator to test whether the result is an integer. –  Craig Neil Brown Feb 19 '13 at 5:50
    
Agreed that it's good to get into the habit of closing files as soon as possible. As for what happens to A, B, and C when reading past the end of the file, they should remain unchanged if I'm correctly rememberring how fscanf works. –  jerry Feb 20 '13 at 3:47

I'm not sure what you're asking for but sending an int in the place of a double can't be useful in any case

#include <stdio.h>
#define FILENAME "input.txt"
int main()
{
double A, B, C; <----------------
int x, y; <-------------------
FILE *input;
input = fopen(FILENAME,"r");
fscanf(input,"%d%d%d", &A,&B,&C);

for(x = 0; x <= 100; x++)
    for(y = 0; y <= 100; y++)
    if(A*x+B*y==C){
    fscanf(input,"%d%d%d", &A,&B,&C);
          if(A*x+B*y==C)
          printf("X=%d, Y=%d\n", x, y);
    }
    return 0;
}
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I am creating a diophantine linear equation solver, where the solutions are integers. It is meaningless to use double in this case. What I want to ask is the problem with my code, as you can see the output has 2 sets of x's and y's, and linear simultaneous equations can only have a set of x and y solution. –  electroniclearner Feb 19 '13 at 5:10

After days of pondering over the code, I finally figured what was wrong.

The mistake is putting the second fscanf function into the loop. When the second fscanf function is in the loop, it has the tendency to scan for the 2nd time and so on.

I will explain it with reference to my code. When the program has successfully found the first set of x and y satisfying the first set of coefficient, or the equation x = 99, which is x = 99 and y = -100, the second fscanf function will scan the second set of coefficient, or the equation 2y = -100. The if function will check if that set of x and y satisfies 2y = -100. Obviously, x = 99 and y = -100 does not satisfy 2y = -100, so the for loop function will repeat the procedure with x = 99 and y = -99. However, from y = -99 onwards, A, B and C in the 1st if function are assigned to the second set of coefficient instead of the first. And the fscanf function will scan for the 2nd time, in which there is no 3rd set of coefficient so it will still scan the second set of coefficients. This results in an error of generating a list of x's and y's that satisfy y = -99, which is not what the program should do!

Thus, I tried putting the second fscanf function out of the loop function, and it worked perfectly. Also, to print the message says the solution cannot be found in the range [-100, 100] only once when there is no solution, I applied the concept of boolean algebra. Here is the corrected code:

#include <stdio.h>
#define FILENAME "input.txt"

int main()
{
    int A_1, B_1, C_1, A_2, B_2, C_2, x, y, NOSOLUTION;
    FILE *input;
    input = fopen(FILENAME,"r");
    fscanf(input,"%d%d%d", &A_1,&B_1,&C_1);
    fscanf(input,"%d%d%d", &A_2,&B_2,&C_2);
    NOSOLUTION = 1;
    for(x = -100; x <= 100 ; x++){
       for(y = -100; y <=100; y++)
         if(A_1*x+B_1*y==C_1 && A_2*x+B_2*y==C_2)
         {
            NOSOLUTION = 0;
            printf("X=%d, Y=%d\n", x, y);
         }
    }
    if(NOSOLUTION == 1)
        printf("Integer solution not found in range [-100, 100] \n");
    return 0;
}

Nevertheless, many thanks to those who responded!

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