Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example, say we have a ticketing system that can be configured to offer tickets at normal price, but once you're within X hours of the event, you offer them at a different price (it may be discounted or increased). We'll call this the 'rush price'. Moreover, once you're within Y hours of the event, you offer them at yet another price. We'll call this the 'emergency price'.

The class that represents this configuration information might look like this:

public class RushTicketPolicy {

    private int rushHours;
    private int emergencyHours;

    public RushTicketPolicy(int rushHours, int emergencyHours) {
        this.rushHours      = rushHours;
        this.emergencyHours = emergencyHours;
    }

    public int RushHours      { get { return this.rushHours; } }
    public int EmergencyHours { get { return this.emergencyHours; } }
}

I'm finding it extremely difficult to come up with names for these variables (and properties) that are sufficiently expressive and complete, without reference to the code that uses them and without additional inference.

That is, someone that hasn't seen the rest of the code or know anything about its business requirements should be able to look at the variable names and understand that:

  • Rush sales start X hours before the event, inclusive.
  • Emergency sales start Y hours before the event, inclusive.

What are some names that would accomplish that?

share|improve this question
1  
A colleague of mine made a very interesting suggestion. I'm trying to badger him into posting it, but the gist is that naming this variable clearly is so difficult because the class does not reference the event, which is a crucial element of the model. Trying to shoehorn it into the variable name inevitably results in confusion. Hence, he suggests something like a TicketingPeriodStart class with an hoursBeforeEvent variable and (crucially) a single public method that better matches how we think of the data: GetTicketingPeriodStartDate(DateTime eventDate). –  Jeff Sternal Oct 3 '09 at 18:16
    
(Continued) That would involve breaking the class from my question into two instances (one representing the start of rush ticketing and the other representing the start of emergency ticketing). Of course, these configuration settings would likely live in a single table in a database, so it may just be deferring the question ... how to name columns that represent thresholds or limits? –  Jeff Sternal Oct 3 '09 at 18:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public class SalesPeriodStartRule {

    private int mHoursBeforeEvent = 0;

    public SalesPeriodStartRule(int hoursBeforeEvent) {
        mHours = hoursBeforeEvent;
    }
    public DateTime GetEffectiveDate(DateTime showDate) {
        return showDate.AddHours(-mHoursBeforeEvent);
    }
}

public class PricingPolicy {
    private SalesPeriodStartRule mRushRule;
    private SalesPeriodStartRule mEmergencyRule;

    public PricingPolicy(SalesPeriodStartRule rushRule, SalesPeriodStartRule emergencyRule) {
        mRushRule      = rushRule;
        mEmergencyRule = emergencyRule;
    }
    public string GetPriceCategory(DateTime purchaseDate, DateTime showDate) {
        if (purchaseDate > mEmergencyRule.GetEffectiveDate(showDate)) {
            return "Emergency";
        }
        else if (purchaseDate > mRushRule.GetEffectiveDate(showDate)) {
            return "Rush";
        }
        else {
            return "Standard";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is from the colleague I mentioned above - I just edited his code to fit the original example. –  Jeff Sternal Oct 7 '09 at 17:11
    
Though part of me is still holding out for a variable name that can express the entire concept as originally stated, refactoring into two classes and encapsulating the effective date calculation does clarify this, so I'm accepting until someone comes up with a variable name that's just right –  Jeff Sternal Oct 13 '09 at 16:35

I'm a fan of verbosity here:

DiscountThresholdInSeconds

Based on your edit #1:

If you have a class "Ticket," I would simply give it a collection of discounts:


    public class Ticket
    {
        private List <Discount> m_availableDiscounts = new List<Discount>();
        private decimal m_basePrice = 0m;
        private DateTime m_showTime;

        public Ticket(DateTime showTime)
        {
            m_showTime = showTime;
        }

        public List<Discount> Discounts
        {
            get
            {
                return m_availableDiscounts;
            }
        }

        public decimal BasePrice
        {
            get
            {
                return m_basePrice;
            }
            set
            {
                m_basePrice = value;
            }
        }

        public DateTime ShowTime
        {
            get
            {
                return m_showTime;
            }
        }

        public decimal CalculatePrice(int quantity)
        {
            //Apply discounts here...
        }
    }

    public class Discount
    {
        private int m_thresholdInSeconds = 0;
        private decimal m_percentOff = 0m;
        private decimal m_flatAmountOff = 0m;

        public Discount(int thresholdInSeconds, decimal percentOff, decimal flatAmountOff)
        {
            m_thresholdInSeconds = thresholdInSeconds;
            m_percentOff = percentOff;
            m_flatAmountOff = flatAmountOff;
        }

        public int ThresholdInSeconds
        {
            get
            {
                return m_thresholdInSeconds;
            }
        }

        public decimal PercentOff
        {
            get
            {
                return m_percentOff;
            }
        }

        public decimal FlatAmountOff
        {
            get
            {
                return m_flatAmountOff;
            }
        }
    }


Edit #2 based on question Edit #2

The difference between what you have listed and the code I provided is that yours only allows for two distinct discount periods while mine will support the tiered model. If we really are talking about tickets here, think about it like a timeline:

Now-------------------------------------------------------------------------ShowTime

At any time in that period, you may have surpassed a threshold (checkpoint, boundary, whatever) that qualifies you for a discount.

------------|------Now------------|------------------|---------------|---|---ShowTime

Since ShowTime is the stable piece of information in this time line, you need to capture "distance" from showtime and the applicable discount. The "distance" from ShowTime is the threshold that gets crossed.

share|improve this answer
1  
I love verbosity too - but given that variable name, does the discount apply before or after the threshold is met? –  Jeff Sternal Sep 29 '09 at 21:52
    
My reading would be after it is met. If it were to be before, I would call it DiscountExpirationThresholdInSeconds. –  Jacob G Sep 29 '09 at 21:54
    
Hmm, I am interested in variable names that can express this directly, such that it is unambiguous. –  Jeff Sternal Sep 30 '09 at 1:19
    
I definitely appreciate the discussion here, and I don't mean to bait and switch with the edits! Indeed, your proposed class design might be superior in cases where it's possible (which it wouldn't be if the threshold information was coming from a different source than the discount information), but the variable name still suffers from the problem I'm trying to solve: thresholdInSeconds doesn't express what the threshold stands in relation to (the event), nor does it describe whether the discount should be applied before or after the interval. –  Jeff Sternal Sep 30 '09 at 13:48
1  
This seems like premature generality to me. His method supports 0,1 or 2 discount periods (you can set the discount to 0.) If it's unlikely that there will ever be more than 2 discount periods, why write longer, less clear code to support a feature that won't be needed? –  RossFabricant Sep 30 '09 at 13:50

Name it what it represents ... :D

RushTicketPolicyValidityIntervalLength

Okay, the class has already part of the information. So what about this?

ValidityIntervalLength

Or something similar.

share|improve this answer
    
The word interval might well be part of the solution, but this doesn't express to what period the interval applies. –  Jeff Sternal Sep 30 '09 at 12:40

Perhaps you could use a fluent interface to make the API a bit more expressive. Consider the following:

public class Test
{
    public string TestPolicies()
    {
        int year = 2010;
        int month = 11;
        int day = 3;
        int hour = 15;
        int minute = 30;
        int second = 0;

        DateTime eventDateTime = new DateTime(year, month, day, hour, minute, second);

        IConfiguredTicketPolicy emergencyTicketPolicy = new TicketPolicy().Starts(2).HoursBefore(eventDateTime).Inclusive();
        IConfiguredTicketPolicy rushTicketPolicy      = new TicketPolicy().Starts(4).HoursBefore(eventDateTime).Inclusive();

        DateTime now = DateTime.Now;

        if (emergencyTicketPolicy.IsEffectiveAsOf(now))
        {
            return "Emergency";
        }
        else if (rushTicketPolicy.IsEffectiveAsOf(now))
        {
            return "Rush";
        }
        else
        {
            return "Standard";
        }            
    }
}

What an implementation of the TicketPolicy class that looks something like this:

    public class TicketPolicy : IConfigurePolicySalesStart, IConfigurePolicyHoursBefore, IConfigurePolicyInclusive, IConfiguredTicketPolicy
{
    private int mHours;
    public IConfigurePolicyHoursBefore Starts(int hours)
    {
        TicketPolicy clone = this.Clone();
        clone.mHours = hours;
        return clone;
    }

    private DateTime mEventDateTime;
    public IConfigurePolicyInclusive HoursBefore(DateTime eventDateTime)
    {
        TicketPolicy clone = this.Clone();
        clone.mEventDateTime = eventDateTime;
        return clone;
    }

    private bool mInclusive = false;
    public IConfiguredTicketPolicy Inclusive()
    {
        TicketPolicy clone = this.Clone();
        clone.mInclusive = true;
        return clone;
    }

    public bool IsEffectiveAsOf(DateTime now)
    {
        DateTime effectiveDate = mEventDateTime.AddHours(-1*this.mHours);
        if (!this.mInclusive)
        {
            effectiveDate = effectiveDate.AddTicks(1);
        }

        return effectiveDate.CompareTo(now) < 0;
    }
    public TicketPolicy Clone()
    {
        TicketPolicy clone = new TicketPolicy();
        clone.Starts(this.mHours);
        clone.HoursBefore(this.mEventDateTime);
        if (this.mInclusive)
        {
            clone.Inclusive();
        }
        return clone;
    }
}  

The interfaces are used to help intellisense navigate the user through the API and may not be necessary. They might look something like this:

public interface IConfigurePolicySalesStart
 {
     IConfigurePolicyHoursBefore Starts(int hours);
 }

 public interface IConfigurePolicyHoursBefore
 {
     IConfigurePolicyInclusive HoursBefore(DateTime eventDateTime);
 }

 public interface IConfigurePolicyInclusive
 {
     IConfiguredTicketPolicy Inclusive();
 }

 public interface IConfiguredTicketPolicy
 {
     bool IsEffectiveAsOf(DateTime now); 
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Edited post to implement IsEffectiveAsOf(DateTime.Now); –  Brandon Nov 3 '10 at 17:37
    
Thinking more about the original question, how about a name like NumberOfDaysBeforeEventLatePeriodBeginsInclusive? –  Brandon Nov 3 '10 at 19:03
    
Also - we may not need to do cloning here....I'm not sure. –  Brandon Nov 3 '10 at 19:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.