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I have two csv files, and each of which consists of one column of data

For instance, vecA.csv is like

id
1
2

vecB.csv is like

id
3
2

I read the data set as follows:

vectorA<-read.table("vecA.csv",sep=",",header=T)
vectorB<-read.table("vecB.csv",sep=",",header=T)

I want to generate a vector consisting of elements belonging to B only.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You are looking for the function setdiff

setdiff(vectorB$id, vectorA$id)

If you did not want this reduced to unique values, you could create a not in function

(kudos to @joran here Match with negation)

'%nin%' <- Negate('%in%')

vectorB$id[vectorB$id %nin% vectorA$id]
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1  
+1 for the Negate addition. I use !(x %in% y) a lot. –  sebastian-c Feb 19 '13 at 4:24
1  
+11 for the Negate(%in%) !!! –  Ricardo Saporta Feb 19 '13 at 7:32
    
to @Joran of course ;) But to mnel too for the reference –  Ricardo Saporta Feb 19 '13 at 7:33
    
+111 for %nin% !! I think I already have some uses for that one. –  N8TRO Feb 19 '13 at 7:44
    
In Frank Harrell's Hmisc package, there's %nin%. –  swihart Oct 24 at 23:26

If your vector's are instead data.tables, then all you need are five characters:

B[!A]

library(data.table)

# read in your data, wrap in data.table(..., key="id") 
A <- data.table(read.table("vecA.csv",sep=",",header=T), key="id")
B <- data.table(read.table("vecB.csv",sep=",",header=T), key="id")

# Then this is all you need
B[!A]

[Matthew] And in v1.8.7 it's simpler and faster to read the file as well :

A <- setkey(fread("vecA.csv"), id)
B <- setkey(fread("vecB.csv"), id)
B[!A]
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2  
Very slick. data.table rocks! And it's blazing fast. –  N8TRO Feb 19 '13 at 7:40

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