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I have lots of characters those are actually function definitions. How can I use that characters to execute those function? The characters I have is as follows:

foo1 <- "function(p1,p2){, v <- 2, print(\"value is \"), print(v)}"

foo2 <- "function(){, cName <- .Call(\"companyNames\"), return(cName)}"

foo3 <- "function(tickers,field,date){,df<-data.frame(Ticker = tickers, Field = field, Date = date), return(df)}"

...etc

I need a general method to execute to all these functions.

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This question is really unclear. Do you have a character string foo <- "function(p1,p2){, v <- 2, print(\"value is \"), print(v)}" which you want to parse into a function? Or are you trying to create a function which returnes value is 2? –  mnel Feb 19 '13 at 4:42
    
actually what i need is to parse that character into a function. I have several characters like this. I need a general method to solve this problem. –  Dinoop Nair Feb 19 '13 at 5:39
    
Given your comment on the answer below, It is entirely unclear what you want, if the answer below is not the correct one. –  mnel Feb 19 '13 at 5:49
    
You've edited your post, do you want all these functions called with no arguments? –  sebastian-c Feb 19 '13 at 6:06
2  
@DinoopNair Are you reading all these functions from a text file? If so, maybe you should try source('file.txt'). –  sebastian-c Feb 19 '13 at 6:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

EDIT: You've changed your question, so I've amended my answer:

do.call(eval(parse(text=foo1)), list())

You can add a named list to each of those functions in the place of list(). But frankly, what you're attempting is bordering on the absurd. I have no idea how you got into a position where you would need these kinds of tools. You're going to have all kinds of scoping problems from here on in.

Old solution:

fun <- eval(parse(text="function(p1,p2){v <- 2; print(paste0(\"value is \", v))}"))
fun()
## [1] "value is 2"
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4  
But in all honesty, I question why you would want to do this. I refer you to the following: library(fortunes); fortune(106). –  sebastian-c Feb 19 '13 at 4:49
    
actually what i need is to parse that character into a function. I have several characters like this. I need a general method to solve this problem. –  Dinoop Nair Feb 19 '13 at 5:39
1  
@DinoopNair: This answer does parse the character string and turns it into a function: fun is a function that you can call. You need to edit your question so it's more clear what you actually want. –  Marius Feb 19 '13 at 5:49
    
@sebastian-c: this solution is almost correct. But the problem is because of the comma where ; is expected. How can i overcome this problem? –  Dinoop Nair Feb 19 '13 at 6:20
    
@sebastian-c ,Marius,mnel - I removed commas from that character. Now i am getting the correct output. Thank you for helping me. –  Dinoop Nair Feb 19 '13 at 6:51

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