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I'm trying to work with C++ java/C# like interfaces by creating classes that have only pure virtual methods, like the following: (this is just an example)

class IMyInterface
{
public:
    virtual int someFunc() = 0;
    virtual ~IMyInterface() {}
};

Everything is fine until I was stuck implementing a method that exchanges two elements in an array of IMyInterface, since it's not allowed in C++ to instantiate an interface as the compiler will complain about temp not implementing someFunc().

void Exchange(IMyInterface* array, int i, int j)
{
    IMyInterface temp = array[i]; // not allowed
    array[i] = array[j];
    array[j] = temp;
}

so I had to change the interface class definition and get rid of pure virtual function and supply a "default" implementation of the method like so:

class IMyInterface
{
public:
    virtual int someFunc()
    {
        return 0;
    }
    virtual ~IMyInterface() {}
};

The problem is that IMyInterface is not an interface anymore, it doesn't force whatever class that will inherit from it to implement someFunc().

Anyway around this?

share|improve this question
2  
since it's not allowed in C++ to instantiate an interface I'm not aware of any language in which that makes sense. What really is your problem? You are not supposed to instantiate interfaces, but inherit from them. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 19 '13 at 5:56
2  
If you need to create instances of IMyInterface it is not a interface(aka Abstract class) anyways. You can either have a interface or not have one. You cannot expect it to be a interface and then want to create instances of it . You cannot get best of both worlds. – Alok Save Feb 19 '13 at 5:56
2  
Interfaces should almost always be used as pointers. – Justin Meiners Feb 19 '13 at 5:57
1  
@Justin: No, nonsense. Sorry. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 19 '13 at 5:57
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit can you give me an example of how an interface would be useful by value? – Justin Meiners Feb 19 '13 at 5:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Interfaces are not fully defined objects so you cannot create instances of them. They are of an undefined size and structure so they obviously cannot be created or used in the value context. You can however create pointers to interfaces (Happy Guys?) because a pointer to an object is very well defined. The sample code could become:

void Exchange(IMyInterface** array, int i, int j)
{
    IMyInterface* temp = array[i]; // allowed :)
    array[i] = array[j];
    array[j] = temp;
}

If the operation is something that should be done by value perhaps a template function would be more appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
@AhmedFakhry Perhaps you misunderstand the IMyInterface** array syntax. It is a pointer to a pointer - in this case a pointer to an array of pointers :P. Simply adding a &array will give you an array of pointer objects. Perhaps it could be better understood by reading this typedef IMyInterface* ptr; ptr* array or IMyInterface* array[20] – Justin Meiners Feb 19 '13 at 6:26
    
I don't see using array is a good c++ practice, why not vector with smart pointers? – billz Feb 19 '13 at 6:30
    
@billz I agree which would be defined as std::vector<IMyInterface*> array; but maybe he has a reason - or maybe it is an exercise. Also there is no assumable reason why smart pointers should be used in this code. – Justin Meiners Feb 19 '13 at 6:31
    
Oh yes I understand what you mean, sorry. – Ahmed Fakhry Feb 19 '13 at 6:31

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