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I currently have this code which will perform the main' function on each of the filenames in the list files.

Ideally I have been trying to combine main and main' but I haven't made much progress. Is there a better way to simplify this or will I need to keep them separate?

{- Start here -}
main :: IO [()]
main = do
    files <- getArgs
    mapM main' files

{- Main's helper function -}
main' :: FilePath -> IO ()
main' file = do 
    contents <- readFile file
    case (runParser parser 0 file $ lexer contents) of Left err -> print err
                                                       Right xs -> putStr xs

Thanks!

Edit: As most of you are suggesting; I was trying a lambda abstraction for this but wasn't getting it right. - Should've specified this above. With the examples I see this better.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use forM, which equals flip mapM, i.e. mapM with its arguments flipped, like this:

forM_ files $ \file -> do
  contents <- readFile file
  ...

Also notice that I used forM_ instead of forM. This is more efficient when you are not interested in the result of the computation.

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1  
forM_ and mapM_ are also good because they make your intentions clearer, so you should generally always use them even if the performance doesn't matter. –  Tikhon Jelvis Feb 19 '13 at 7:16
    
Ah yes, I was attempting something similar to this but I am fairly new to flip and failed to think of using it here. –  Dacto Feb 19 '13 at 7:22

The Control.Monad library defines the function forM which is mapM is reverse arguments. That makes it easier to use in your situation, i.e.

main :: IO ()
main = do
    files <- getArgs
    forM_ files $ \file -> do
        contents <- readFile file
        case (runParser f 0 file $ lexer contents) of
            Left err -> print err   
            Right xs -> putStr xs

The version with the underscore at the end of the name is used when you are not interested in the resulting list (like in this case), so main can simply have the type IO (). (mapM has a similar variant called mapM_).

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I'm using mapM_/forM_ now. :) –  Dacto Feb 19 '13 at 7:23

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