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I've been doing programming from quite a time but, still i'm not sure what is the smarter way to declare array.

Since, array size have to be declared first and we can't declare it dynamically.

 1) int a[10] = {0};
 2) int a[m] = {0};      //error

As well as during initialization of array which is the smarter and faster way

1) int a[10] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};
2) int a[10];
   for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    a[i] = i;

And why in c++ array index not always starts with 0 like in java.

smarter means saving space as well as time as well as manpower.

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closed as not constructive by SJuan76, Alexey Frunze, Henrik, leemes, billz Feb 19 '13 at 7:31

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What's wrong with std::vector? –  leemes Feb 19 '13 at 7:27
2  
"And why in c++ array index not always starts with 0 like in java." Who said? –  Maroun Maroun Feb 19 '13 at 7:27
1  
C and C++ arrays are 0-based, always. I mean, the first index is always 0. –  MikMik Feb 19 '13 at 7:27
    
AFAIR, C++ does not support variable-length arrays (VLAs), that's why int a[m] may fail to compile. –  Alexey Frunze Feb 19 '13 at 7:28
    
It's unclear what part of your post are facts (or alleged facts), and what part is the actual question. –  jogojapan Feb 19 '13 at 7:28

3 Answers 3

In C++ use std::vector when you need it dynamically sized. Also, indexes are 0 based in C++.

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Since, array size have to be declared first and we can't declare it dynamically.

That's wrong:

In C99 you can declare an array with variable size(VLAs).

in C++, you can use std::vector<>

and in Java: you can use ArrayList<T>

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Array index in C++ always starts with 0. As for which is the faster computational way to initialize an array, the first one is faster as you initialize the array during its declaration and you don't do the cycle below.

If you want to have an array that is with dynamic size better use std::vector in C++ or use dynamically allocated memory(using malloc) in C. As for java - just use ArrayList. Still C99 allows you to declare an array with variable size.

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