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On IE I can do this with the (terribly non-standard, but working) jQuery

if ($.browser.msie)
    $(document).keydown(function(e) { if (e.keyCode == 8) window.event.keyCode = 0;});

But is it possible to do in a way which works on Firefox, or in a cross-browser way for a bonus?

For the record:

$(document).keydown(function(e) { if (e.keyCode == 8) e.stopPropagation(); });

does nothing.

$(document).keydown(function(e) { if (e.keyCode == 8) e.preventDefault(); });

solves the problem, but renders the backspace key unusable on the page, which is even worse than the original behaviour.

EDIT: The reason I do this is that I'm not creating a simple web page but a large application. It is incredibly annoying to lose 10 minutes of work just because you pressed backspace in the wrong place. The ratio of preventing mistakes vs. annoying users should be way above 1000/1 by preventing the backspace key from navigating back.

EDIT2: I'm not trying to prevent history navigation, just accidents.

EDIT3: @brentonstrines comment (moved here since the question is so popular): This is a long-term 'fix', but you could throw your support behind the Chromium bug to change this behavior in webkit

share|improve this question
82  
Because the backspace key is overloaded. You might not have noticed it, but you probably use it all the time for erasing letters you've just typed in a text field. Some of my customers have been having trouble with that causing the page to go back, so this is useful information. Nobody but you clowns knows that backspace is supposed to go back a page. That's something I never knew, and it's outright hostile behavior for a browser to have. I think all pages should disable that behavior. –  Breton Sep 29 '09 at 22:32
50  
Why do people think this is odd? Using backspace for navigation is a really dumb shortcut! there are so many text fields that users might want to delete text from - imagine having a long SO answer, switching to another window to check something, and then you come back and mis-click the edit area, press backspace to remove a word and suddenly the browser goes back a page and you've potentially lost everything you just wrote. –  Peter Boughton Sep 29 '09 at 22:33
33  
Why I want to do this? I'm not creating a web site but a web application. Some input fields are read-only in which case they look editable, but if you press backspace you leave the page. The ratio of backspace presses intending to navigate back vs. backspace presses trying to erase something is probably much less than 1 / 1000. –  erikkallen Sep 30 '09 at 8:31
21  
The question is how to do this, not your opinion on whether it is a good idea or not. Without knowing the details of the project your opinions are meaningless. My client has specifically requested this behavior for one of my projects and a real answer rather than "Why would you ever want to do that?" would be helpful. –  J.Money Dec 7 '12 at 1:59
3  
This is a long-term 'fix', but you could throw your support behind the Chromium bug to change this behavior in webkit: code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=144832 –  brentonstrine Dec 18 '12 at 0:23

26 Answers 26

up vote 158 down vote accepted

This code solves the problem, at least in IE and Firefox (haven't tested any other, but I give it a reasonable chance of working if the problem even exists in other browsers).

// Prevent the backspace key from navigating back.
$(document).unbind('keydown').bind('keydown', function (event) {
    var doPrevent = false;
    if (event.keyCode === 8) {
        var d = event.srcElement || event.target;
        if ((d.tagName.toUpperCase() === 'INPUT' && 
             (
                 d.type.toUpperCase() === 'TEXT' ||
                 d.type.toUpperCase() === 'PASSWORD' || 
                 d.type.toUpperCase() === 'FILE' || 
                 d.type.toUpperCase() === 'EMAIL' || 
                 d.type.toUpperCase() === 'SEARCH' || 
                 d.type.toUpperCase() === 'DATE' )
             ) || 
             d.tagName.toUpperCase() === 'TEXTAREA') {
            doPrevent = d.readOnly || d.disabled;
        }
        else {
            doPrevent = true;
        }
    }

    if (doPrevent) {
        event.preventDefault();
    }
});
share|improve this answer
8  
+1 for the exception of text fields. –  Stefan Jan 13 '12 at 12:12
6  
Breaks password fields. –  Hemlock Mar 12 '12 at 16:02
6  
As Hemlock stated - check for d.type.toUpperCase() === 'PASSWORD' as well. Otherwise looks good –  stevendesu Jun 4 '12 at 22:43
10  
Since you're already using jQuery if( $(d).is( ":input" ) )... –  Paul Alexander Oct 12 '12 at 21:24
3  
It sucks that this has to be a whitelist, rather than being able to blacklist the "back" functionality. You may want to add a check for d.isContentEditable in here. –  iono Sep 12 '13 at 5:09

This code works on all browsers and swallows the backspace key when not on a form element, or if the form element is disabled|readOnly. It is also efficient, which is important when it is executing on every key typed in.

$(function(){
    /*
     * this swallows backspace keys on any non-input element.
     * stops backspace -> back
     */
    var rx = /INPUT|SELECT|TEXTAREA/i;

    $(document).bind("keydown keypress", function(e){
        if( e.which == 8 ){ // 8 == backspace
            if(!rx.test(e.target.tagName) || e.target.disabled || e.target.readOnly ){
                e.preventDefault();
            }
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Please test my example, you may wish to update your code accordingly. –  Biff MaGriff Nov 21 '11 at 22:46
3  
I prefer this over @erikkallen's solution because it's cleaner. However, I wanted submit buttons, radio buttons, and check boxes to also be ignored, so I changed the if() to this: if(!rx.test(e.target.tagName) || $(e.target).is(':checkbox') || $(e.target).is(':radio') || $(e.target).is(':submit') || e.target.disabled || e.target.readOnly ) –  MaffooClock Nov 20 '12 at 17:46
    
@thetoolman, see my comment on erikallen's answer. This should also account for contentEditable. –  jolt May 16 '13 at 14:59
1  
@MaffooClock: you can be more concise with .is(':checkbox,:radio,:submit') –  cdmckay Feb 22 at 22:17
    
@cdmckay: I can't believe I didn't write it that way in the first place. Thanks for cleaning that up for us all :) –  MaffooClock Feb 24 at 3:20

Modification of erikkallen's Answer to address different input types

I've found that an enterprising user might press backspace on a checkbox or a radio button in a vain attempt to clear it and instead they would navigate backwards and lose all of their data.

This change should address that issue.

New Edit to address content editable divs

    //Prevents backspace except in the case of textareas and text inputs to prevent user navigation.
    $(document).keydown(function (e) {
        var preventKeyPress;
        if (e.keyCode == 8) {
            var d = e.srcElement || e.target;
            switch (d.tagName.toUpperCase()) {
                case 'TEXTAREA':
                    preventKeyPress = d.readOnly || d.disabled;
                    break;
                case 'INPUT':
                    preventKeyPress = d.readOnly || d.disabled ||
                        (d.attributes["type"] && $.inArray(d.attributes["type"].value.toLowerCase(), ["radio", "checkbox", "submit", "button"]) >= 0);
                    break;
                case 'DIV':
                    preventKeyPress = d.readOnly || d.disabled || !(d.attributes["contentEditable"] && d.attributes["contentEditable"].value == "true");
                    break;
                default:
                    preventKeyPress = true;
                    break;
            }
        }
        else
            preventKeyPress = false;

        if (preventKeyPress)
            e.preventDefault();
    });

Example
To test make 2 files.

starthere.htm - open this first so you have a place to go back to

<a href="./test.htm">Navigate to here to test</a>

test.htm - This will navigate backwards when backspace is pressed while the checkbox or submit has focus (achieved by tabbing). Replace with my code to fix.

<html>
<head>
<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.4/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">

    $(document).keydown(function(e) {
        var doPrevent;
        if (e.keyCode == 8) {
            var d = e.srcElement || e.target;
            if (d.tagName.toUpperCase() == 'INPUT' || d.tagName.toUpperCase() == 'TEXTAREA') {
                doPrevent = d.readOnly || d.disabled;
            }
            else
                doPrevent = true;
        }
        else
            doPrevent = false;

        if (doPrevent)
            e.preventDefault();
    });
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="text" />
<input type="radio" />
<input type="checkbox" />
<input type="submit" />
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
What browser did you see backspace press on radio|checkbox|submit -> back function ? I havent seen a browser do this.. –  thetoolman Nov 21 '11 at 20:30
    
Internet Explorer 8 and Chrome –  Biff MaGriff Nov 21 '11 at 22:28
1  
this is great work, many thanks –  nodrog Nov 19 '12 at 19:52
    
thanks for this, works great –  Aran Mulholland Jul 10 '13 at 6:14
2  
I tried a number of other solutions in this thread, but this one worked well in all my situations and had the cleanest, easiest to understand code. Thank you. –  Ezward Aug 26 '13 at 18:22

Not sure why no-one's just answered this - seems like a perfectly reasonable technical question to ask whether it's possible.

No, I don't think there's a cross-browser way to disable the backspace button. I know it's not enabled by default in FF these days though.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for reasonable-ness. –  Jim Rubenstein Nov 19 '13 at 23:14

Based on the comments it appears you want to stop people losing information in forms, if they press backspace to delete but the field is not focused.

In which case, you want to look at the onunload event handler. Stack Overflow uses it - if you try to leave a page when you've started writing an answer, it pops up a warning.

share|improve this answer
3  
sorry that was a rude comment. What I mean is, the user probably doesn't want to be berated for doing something they didn't even know was wrong. Why not just silently eat the key with an onkeydown? The goal is not to completely prevent the user from leaving the page, but to guard against this common mistake. In addition, pop up dialogues are not very effective, or useful. Users don't read them. Are you sure you want to leave the page? Okay! No wait wait, I didn't want to leave the page.. oops too late. –  Breton Sep 30 '09 at 2:46
3  
OK then take it or leave it. I think you're trying to over-engineer a problem that doesn't really exist, or at least isn't important. And in my experience, it's only power users who click "OK" on unfamiliar dialogs without reading them properly. ;) –  DisgruntledGoat Sep 30 '09 at 10:49
2  
Are you and Breton the same person? Anyway you kinda shot yourself in the foot there - the article says "the default answer is Cancel" so when seeing the dialog about leaving the page, they're going to press "Cancel" and therefore not leave the page. Though it should be noted that Chrome's options on that dialog are "Leave this page" and "Stay on this page" which are very clear. –  DisgruntledGoat Sep 30 '09 at 12:13
1  
No, he is not me, but I've come across that link before. I think the comments are hilarious. "What!? people ignore modal dialog boxes? We must find a way to make them even MORE persistent and annoying!". Really explains a lot about microsoft software. –  Breton Oct 1 '09 at 3:29
2  
@Disgruntled: No, I'm not Breton, and the point of the article is not "The default choice is..." but "users don't read anything." –  erikkallen Oct 1 '09 at 20:34

Combining solutions given by "thetoolman" && "Biff MaGriff"

following code seems to work correctly in IE 8/Mozilla/Chrome

$(function () {
    var rx = /INPUT|TEXTAREA/i;
    var rxT = /RADIO|CHECKBOX|SUBMIT/i;

    $(document).bind("keydown keypress", function (e) {
        var preventKeyPress;
        if (e.keyCode == 8) {
            var d = e.srcElement || e.target;
            if (rx.test(e.target.tagName)) {
                var preventPressBasedOnType = false;
                if (d.attributes["type"]) {
                    preventPressBasedOnType = rxT.test(d.attributes["type"].value);
                }
                preventKeyPress = d.readOnly || d.disabled || preventPressBasedOnType;
            } else {preventKeyPress = true;}
        } else { preventKeyPress = false; }

        if (preventKeyPress) e.preventDefault();
    });
}); 
share|improve this answer
1  
I missed the BUTTON type. –  Biff MaGriff Apr 30 '12 at 15:51
    
Adding IMAGE might also be useful. –  mrswadge Sep 25 at 10:01

This solution is similar to others that have been posted, but it uses a simple whitelist making it easily customizable to allow the backspace in specified elements just by setting the selector in the .is() function.

I use it in this form to prevent the backspace on pages from navigating back:

$(document).on("keydown", function (e) {
    if (e.which === 8 && !$(e.target).is("input:not([readonly]), textarea")) {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
});
share|improve this answer
1  
When user uses contenteditable, this would make it disabled. So you might want to add the contenteditable=true in the whitelist –  Miguel Jul 24 '13 at 22:57

A more elegant/concise solution:

$(document).on('keydown',function(e){
  var $target = $(e.target||e.srcElement);
  if(e.keyCode == 8 && !$target.is('input,[contenteditable="true"],textarea'))
  {
    e.preventDefault();
  }
})
share|improve this answer
    
This is a lot more concise and from what I can tell works just as well. Why is it that the most popular answer has all those check for types of inputs, and seems more complicated? Is it more reliable? –  nearpoint Sep 12 at 1:45
    
The most popular answer was the first one to answer the question, thus the high votes. –  Darwayne Sep 12 at 12:06

The other answers here have established that this cannot be done without whitelisting elements in which Backspace is allowed. This solution is not ideal because the whitelist is not as straightforward as merely textareas and text/password inputs, but is repeatedly found to be incomplete and needing to be updated. However, since the purpose of suppressing the backspace functionality is merely to prevent users from accidentally losing data, the beforeunload solution is a good one because the modal popup is surprising--modal popups are bad when they are triggered as part of a standard workflow, because the user gets used to dismissing them without reading them, and they are annoying. In this case, the modal popup would only appear as an alternative to a rare and surprising action, and is therefore acceptable. The problem is that an onbeforeunload modal must not pop up whenever the user navigates away from the page (such as when submitting a form or clicking a link), and we don't want to start whitelisting or blacklisting specific onbeforeunload conditions. The ideal combination of tradeoffs for a generalized solution is as follows: keep track of whether the last user input, whether keypress or mouse click, is a Backspace--and only pop up the onbeforeunload modal if it is. In other words:

function confirmBackspaceNavigations(){
    var lastUserInputWasBackspace = false
    $(document).keydown(function(event){
        lastUserInputWasBackspace = event.which == 8 ? true : false
    })
    $(document).mousedown(function(){
        lastUserInputWasBackspace = false
    })
    $(window).on('beforeunload', function(){
        if (lastUserInputWasBackspace) {
            return "Are you sure you want to leave this page?"
        }
    })
}

This has been tested to work in IE7+, FireFox, Chrome, Safari, and Opera. Just drop this function into your global.js and call it from any page where you don't want users to accidentally lose their data. It is not important to handle edge conditions such as the user pressing Backspace in a text field and then navigating away by clicking the browser's refresh button (it will practically never happen, and when it does, it's just an extra confirmation prompt, no big deal).

share|improve this answer
1  
I just went to add this same solution and saw this post at bottom of the page LOL. One difference I have is to set lastUserInputWasBackspace = false before the return "Are you sure..." statement, so you don't get the popup if you happen to click back button after already seeing the popup (so it's consistent with non-backspace-influenced behavior). –  David Russell Jul 15 at 2:46

Here is a way to do it in Firefox and IE. However I would highly insist that you don't do this. As the comments state it's generally not a good idea to override default behavior unless it makes sense.

Lets say for example that you wanted to save a copy of this webpage for viewing offline, you pressed Ctrl+S and instead of your browser saving the web page, your browser just closes. How would that make you feel? Probably a little pissed.

share|improve this answer
3  
I kinda like that Google docs overrides the save function. But otherwise I agree. erikkallen: Are trying to prevent back in history altogether? You could loop through all inputs and textareas in the document in your function and only preventDefault if nothing has focus. –  Jesse Kochis Sep 29 '09 at 22:29
15  
That's not a fair comparison. The backspace key behavior is bad and hostile, and deserves to be disabled. ctrl+s is an entirely different kettle of fish. –  Breton Sep 29 '09 at 22:33
2  
How did you style Ctrl and S to look like keyboard buttons? –  Omar Sep 29 '09 at 22:40
2  
Using the <kbd> tag that Markdown provides. Take a look at the complete reference: stackoverflow.com/editing-help –  Lucas Sep 29 '09 at 22:43
22  
No user I have ever met expects it to behave that way. When my users discovered that it works that way, I get the blame by default. It was a mistake, and it should be undone. We should not enshrine default behavior as "the correct way" just because it's default. I've also had to disable the new draggable apis that browsers have now, because they ruin traditional mousedown/mouseup/mousemove drag and drop behavior. Default behaviors aren't always expected, and they aren't always a good idea. This is a very good case. It's a downright evil feature by any measure. –  Breton Sep 29 '09 at 22:45
    document.onkeydown = function (e) {    
        e.stopPropagation();
        if ((e.keyCode==8  ||  e.keyCode==13) &&
            (e.target.tagName != "TEXTAREA") && 
            (e.target.tagName != "INPUT")) { 
            return false;
        }
    };
share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't use return false. e.preventDefault is recommended. Also you are stopping propagation of the event for every key and not just the backspace. Finally, keyCode 13 is enter and the question was about preventing back navigation with backspace, but this would prevent enter from submitting the form or performing other actions. –  J.Money Dec 7 '12 at 3:36

This code solves the problem in all browsers:

onKeydown:function(e)
{
    if (e.keyCode == 8) 
    {
      var d = e.srcElement || e.target;
      if (!((d.tagName.toUpperCase() == 'BODY') || (d.tagName.toUpperCase() == 'HTML'))) 
      {
         doPrevent = false;
      }
       else
      {
         doPrevent = true;
      }
    }
    else
    {
       doPrevent = false;
    }
      if (doPrevent)
      {
         e.preventDefault();
       }

  }
share|improve this answer
    
I find this code does not work as expected due to the d.tagname being DIV or TD. –  Biff MaGriff Oct 25 '11 at 20:32
    
The code from Haseeb Akhtar works perfect in Chrome and Firefox, but surprise!! not in IE6-9 Any suggestions? –  Martin Andersen Jan 13 '12 at 11:27

I had some problems with the accepted solution and the Select2.js plugin; I was not able to delete characters in the editable box as the delete action was being prevented. This was my solution:

//Prevent backwards navigation when trying to delete disabled text. $(document).unbind('keydown').bind('keydown', function (event) {

if (event.keyCode === 8) {

    var doPrevent = false,
        d = event.srcElement || event.target,
        tagName = d.tagName.toUpperCase(),
        type = (d.type ? d.type.toUpperCase() : ""),
        isEditable = d.contentEditable,
        isReadOnly = d.readOnly,
        isDisabled = d.disabled;

    if (( tagName === 'INPUT' && (type === 'TEXT' || type === 'PASSWORD') ) ||  tagName === 'PASSWORD' || tagName === 'TEXTAREA') {

        doPrevent =  isReadOnly || isDisabled;
    }
    else if(tagName === 'SPAN'){

        doPrevent = !isEditable;
    }
    else {

        doPrevent = true;
    }
}

if (doPrevent) {
    event.preventDefault();
}

});

Select2 creates a Span with an attribute of "contentEditable" which is set to true for the editable combo box in it. I added code to account for the spans tagName and the different attribute. This solved all my problems.

Edit: If you are not using the Select2 combobox plugin for jquery, then this solution may not be needed by you, and the accepted solution might be better.

share|improve this answer

To elaborate slightly on @erikkallen's excellent answer, here is a function that allows all keyboard-based input types, including those introduced in HTML5:

$(document).unbind('keydown').bind('keydown', function (event) {
    var doPrevent = false;
    var INPUTTYPES = [
        "text", "password", "file", "date", "datetime", "datetime-local",
        "month", "week", "time", "email", "number", "range", "search", "tel",
        "url"];
    var TEXTRE = new RegExp("^" + INPUTTYPES.join("|") + "$", "i");
    if (event.keyCode === 8) {
        var d = event.srcElement || event.target;
        if ((d.tagName.toUpperCase() === 'INPUT' && d.type.match(TEXTRE)) ||
             d.tagName.toUpperCase() === 'TEXTAREA') {
            doPrevent = d.readOnly || d.disabled;
        } else {
            doPrevent = true;
        }
    }
    if (doPrevent) {
        event.preventDefault();
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I am using this answer! Have you found any issues with this solutions so far? –  nearpoint Sep 12 at 1:36

Simplest way to prevent navigation on pressing backspace

$(document).keydown(function () {
    if (event.keyCode == 8) {
        if (event.target.nodeName == 'BODY') {
            event.preventDefault();
        }
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Prevents navigation on pressing backspcae, and at the same time allows backspace with in all input controls –  Mohammed Irfan Mayan Mar 17 '12 at 9:54
    
And dont miss the first line..$(document).keydown(function () { –  Mohammed Irfan Mayan Mar 17 '12 at 10:05
2  
this will disable the backbutton inside textareas and inputs –  nodrog Nov 19 '12 at 19:52
    
not working in ie8 –  Machinegon Nov 21 '12 at 16:44

Have you tried the very simple solution of just adding the following attribute to your read only text field:

onkeydown="return false;"

This will keep the browser from going back in history when the Backspace key is pressed in a read only text field. Maybe I am missing your true intent, but seems like this would be the simplest solution to your issue.

share|improve this answer

A much neater solution -

$(document).on('keydown', function (e) {
    var key = e == null ? event.keyCode : e.keyCode;
    if(key == 8 && $(document.activeElement.is(':not(:input)')))   //select, textarea
      e.preventDefault();
});

Alternately, you could only check if

$(document.activeElement).is('body')
share|improve this answer

Pure javascript version, which works in all browsers:

document.onkeydown = function(e) {stopDefaultBackspaceBehaviour(e);}
document.onkeypress = function(e) {stopDefaultBackspaceBehaviour(e);}

function stopDefaultBackspaceBehaviour(event) {
  var event = event || window.event;
  if (event.keyCode == 8) {
    var elements = "HTML, BODY, TABLE, TBODY, TR, TD, DIV";
    var d = event.srcElement || event.target;
    var regex = new RegExp(d.tagName.toUpperCase());
    if (regex.test(elements)) {
      event.preventDefault ? event.preventDefault() : event.returnValue = false;
    }
  }
}

Of course you can use "INPUT, TEXTAREA" and use "if (!regex.test(elements))" then. The first worked fine for me.

share|improve this answer

Sitepoint: Disable back for Javascript

event.stopPropagation() and event.preventDefault() do nothing in IE. I had to send return event.keyCode == 11 (I just picked something) instead of just saying "if not = 8, run the event" to make it work, though. event.returnValue = false also works.

share|improve this answer

Another method using jquery

    <script type="text/javascript">

    //set this variable according to the need within the page
    var BACKSPACE_NAV_DISABLED = true;

    function fnPreventBackspace(event){if (BACKSPACE_NAV_DISABLED && event.keyCode == 8) {return false;}}
    function fnPreventBackspacePropagation(event){if(BACKSPACE_NAV_DISABLED && event.keyCode == 8){event.stopPropagation();}return true;}

    $(document).ready(function(){ 
        if(BACKSPACE_NAV_DISABLED){
            //for IE use keydown, for Mozilla keypress  
            //as described in scr: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/scripting/PreventDropdownBackSpace.aspx
            $(document).keypress(fnPreventBackspace);
            $(document).keydown(fnPreventBackspace);

            //Allow Backspace is the following controls 
            var jCtrl = null;
            jCtrl = $('input[type="text"]');
            jCtrl.keypress(fnPreventBackspacePropagation);
            jCtrl.keydown(fnPreventBackspacePropagation);

            jCtrl = $('input[type="password"]');
            jCtrl.keypress(fnPreventBackspacePropagation);
            jCtrl.keydown(fnPreventBackspacePropagation);

            jCtrl = $('textarea');
            jCtrl.keypress(fnPreventBackspacePropagation);
            jCtrl.keydown(fnPreventBackspacePropagation);

            //disable backspace for readonly and disabled
            jCtrl = $('input[type="text"][readonly="readonly"]')
            jCtrl.keypress(fnPreventBackspace);
            jCtrl.keydown(fnPreventBackspace);

            jCtrl = $('input[type="text"][disabled="disabled"]')
            jCtrl.keypress(fnPreventBackspace);
            jCtrl.keydown(fnPreventBackspace);
        }
    }); 

    </script>
share|improve this answer
    
Please note this does not work if controls(textbox) have been dynamically added. –  CodeNepal Dec 13 '11 at 9:12

Using Dojo toolkit 1.7, this works in IE 8:

require(["dojo/on", "dojo/keys", "dojo/domReady!"],
function(on, keys) {
    on(document.body,"keydown",function(evt){if(evt.keyCode == keys.BACKSPACE)evt.preventDefault()});
});
share|improve this answer

I've been using this in my code for some time now. I write online tests for students and ran into the problem when students were pressing backspace during their test and it would take them back to the login screen. Frustrating! It works on FF for sure.

document.onkeypress = Backspace;
function Backspace(event) {
    if (event.keyCode == 8) {
        if (document.activeElement.tagName == "INPUT") {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Performance?

I was worried about performance and made a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/felvhage/k2rT6/9/embedded/result/

var stresstest = function(e, method, index){...

I have analyzed the most promising methods i found in this thread. It turns out, they were all very fast and most probably do not cause a problem in terms of "sluggishness" when typing. The slowest Method i looked at was about 125 ms for 10.000 Calls in IE8. Which is 0.0125ms per Stroke.

I found the methods posted by Codenepal and Robin Maben to be fastest ~ 0.001ms (IE8) but beware of the different semantics.

Perhaps this is a relief to someone introducing this kind of functionality to his code.

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I had a hard time finding a non-JQUERY answer. Thanks to Stas for putting me on the track.

Chrome: If you don't need cross browser support, you can just use a blacklist, rather than whitelisting. This pure JS version works in Chrome, but not in IE. Not sure about FF and Safari.

In Chrome (ver. 36, mid 2014), keypresses not on an input or contenteditable element seem to be targeted to <BODY>. This makes it possible use a blacklist, which I prefer to whitelisting. IE uses the last click target - so it might be a div or anything else. That makes this useless in IE.

window.onkeydown = function(event) {
    if (event.keyCode == 8) {
    //alert(event.target.tagName); //if you want to see how chrome handles keypresses not on an editable element
        if (event.target.tagName == 'BODY') {
            //alert("Prevented Navigation");
            event.preventDefault();
        }
    }
}  

Cross Browser: For pure javascript, I found Stas' answer to be the best. Adding one more condition check for contenteditable made it work for me*:

document.onkeydown = function(e) {stopDefaultBackspaceBehaviour(e);}
document.onkeypress = function(e) {stopDefaultBackspaceBehaviour(e);}

function stopDefaultBackspaceBehaviour(event) {
    var event = event || window.event;
    if (event.keyCode == 8) {
        var elements = "HTML, BODY, TABLE, TBODY, TR, TD, DIV";
        var d = event.srcElement || event.target;
        var regex = new RegExp(d.tagName.toUpperCase());
        if (d.contentEditable != 'true') { //it's not REALLY true, checking the boolean value (!== true) always passes, so we can use != 'true' rather than !== true/
            if (regex.test(elements)) {
                event.preventDefault ? event.preventDefault() : event.returnValue = false;
            }
        }
    }
}

*Note that IEs have a "feature" that makes table-related elements uneditable. If you click one of those and THEN press backspace, it WILL navigate back. If you don't have editable <TD>s, this is not an issue.

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Modified erikkallen answer:

$(document).unbind('keydown').bind('keydown', function (event) {

    var doPrevent = false, elem;

    if (event.keyCode === 8) {
        elem = event.srcElement || event.target;
        if( $(elem).is(':input') ) {
            doPrevent = elem.readOnly || elem.disabled;
        } else {
            doPrevent = true;
        }
    }

    if (doPrevent) {
        event.preventDefault();
        return false;
    }
});
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Worked for me

<script type="text/javascript">


 if (typeof window.event != 'undefined')
    document.onkeydown = function()
    {
        if (event.srcElement.tagName.toUpperCase() != 'INPUT')
            return (event.keyCode != 8);
    }
else
    document.onkeypress = function(e)
    {
        if (e.target.nodeName.toUpperCase() != 'INPUT')
            return (e.keyCode != 8);
    }

</script>
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