Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am selecting some path on linux box for installation. e.g /var/test/installer How can I check if read, write and execute permissions are available for that path?

I did try "find command" but have no great success.

Guys, doing "ls -l" is not helping me. Here is a real issue... my /var partition does not have execute permissions. I can see that by using "mount" command i.e. > mount /dev/sda1 on /var type ext3 (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,noatime)

but ls -l for any folder under /var ie. /var/test/install shows me read,write & execute permissions.

So I see only way to grep a mount command to check noexec.

Your Thoughts.

Thanks in advance.

===============================================

All I understand ultimately is I have to check two level of permissions

  1. Permissions for Mount Point

    Using "mount" command or checking /etc/fstab file

  2. permissions for individual folders

    Usinf "ls -l" command

This solved my issue.

share|improve this question
3  
Did you mean 'ls -l' and see that 'rwxr-xr-x' part on the left, no? –  Kristiono Setyadi Feb 19 '13 at 7:56
    
Please See the updates in question. –  Aryan Feb 21 '13 at 10:06
1  
Do you have any specific needs or goals on why you want to do this? If so, please state that also so people will not get confuse on which directions you want to take with this kind of question hence others can shoot your problem exactly how you want it to be solved. –  Kristiono Setyadi Feb 21 '13 at 10:18
    
The erason I want to do is...checking only read write permissions for installation is not enough ...as this path have write permission...everything will be installed well...but when I would try to run services after this installation...Nothing works ...as dont have executable privilege there. This is the issue I am facing...So while selecting the installation path...I want to check all these permisiions –  Aryan Feb 21 '13 at 10:26
    
That would be a different question. Also failure to execute something can be caused by a number of things besides a partition mounted with noexec, e.g. not enough memory, no permission (only the group can execute it and you're not part of it), SELinux etc. –  Cristian Ciupitu Feb 21 '13 at 15:24
add comment

4 Answers

take a look at the test command

from manpage

       -c FILE
          FILE exists and is character special

       -d FILE
          FILE exists and is a directory

       -e FILE
          FILE exists

       -f FILE
          FILE exists and is a regular file

       -g FILE
          FILE exists and is set-group-ID

       -G FILE
          FILE exists and is owned by the effective group ID

       -h FILE
          FILE exists and is a symbolic link (same as -L)

       -k FILE
          FILE exists and has its sticky bit set

       -L FILE
          FILE exists and is a symbolic link (same as -h)

       -O FILE
          FILE exists and is owned by the effective user ID

       -p FILE
          FILE exists and is a named pipe

       -r FILE
          FILE exists and read permission is granted

       -s FILE
          FILE exists and has a size greater than zero

       -S FILE
          FILE exists and is a socket

       -t FD  file descriptor FD is opened on a terminal

       -u FILE
          FILE exists and its set-user-ID bit is set

       -w FILE
          FILE exists and write permission is granted

       -x FILE
          FILE exists and execute (or search) permission is granted

A good man page

share|improve this answer
    
I guess its really hard to use that against...file permissions. I didnt find any suitable example. –  Aryan Feb 19 '13 at 8:16
2  
what's the difficulty in doing if (test -x somefile) or if (test -w somefile) ? –  BigMike Feb 19 '13 at 8:17
    
moreover the test commandi is shortcut with if [ -x somefile ] I find it pretty natural while writing shell scripts. –  BigMike Feb 19 '13 at 8:18
    
It doesnt show me any output on console –  Aryan Feb 19 '13 at 8:22
1  
@Aryan: you need to check the exit status of the command, e.g. run echo $? afterwards from the command line or do something like test -x FILE && echo "FILE is executable". –  Cristian Ciupitu Feb 19 '13 at 8:25
add comment

try ls -l [file_name] see here

share|improve this answer
    
Please See the updates in question. –  Aryan Feb 21 '13 at 10:07
add comment
ls -la /path/

Sample Output:
-rw-r--r-- 1 eclipse adm 14112 Feb 18 08:49 st433.dat
-rw-r--r-- 1 eclipse adm 24700 Feb 18 08:49 st433.lst
-rw-r--r-- 1 eclipse adm 14112 Feb 18 08:49 st434.dat
-rw-r--r-- 1 eclipse adm 24624 Feb 18 08:49 st434.lst

Interpreting permission bits:
-rw-r--r--
0123456789

You can see that the list of files belong to user eclipse and group adm

First bit 0 is a special case, blank for normal files d for directory etc, doesn't have to do with permissions.

Bits 123 define owner permissions (in this case eclipse user). rw- Means that user eclipse can both read or write to these files.

Bits 456 are the group permissions, hence in this case (r--) anybody else who belongs in group adm can read, but not modify, the above files.

Bits 789 are permissions for "others", so the file is readable to other users as well but not writeable.

rwx rwx rwx
USER GROUP OTHERS
read/write/execute permissions

share|improve this answer
    
Please See the updates in question. –  Aryan Feb 21 '13 at 10:07
add comment

If the test command isn't your thing, maybe stat(1) can help you:

[joe@hal ~]$ stat --format='%A' /etc/passwd # access rights in human readable form
-rw-r--r--
[joe@hal ~]$ stat --format='%a' /etc/passwd # access rights in octal
644
[joe@hal ~]$ stat --format='%f' /etc/passwd # raw mode in hex
81a4

81a4 in hexadecimal is 100644 in octal.

The chmod(1) man page says how to interpret the file mode:

The letters rwxXst select file mode bits for the affected users: read (r), write (w), execute (or search for directories) (x), execute/search only if the file is a directory or already has execute permission for some user (X), set user or group ID on execution (s), restricted deletion flag or sticky bit (t). Instead of one or more of these letters, you can specify exactly one of the letters ugo: the permissions granted to the user who owns the file (u), the permissions granted to other users who are members of the file's group (g), and the permissions granted to users that are in neither of the two preceding categories (o).

A numeric mode is from one to four octal digits (0-7), derived by adding up the bits with values 4, 2, and 1. Omitted digits are assumed to be leading zeros. The first digit selects the set user ID (4) and set group ID (2) and restricted deletion or sticky (1) attributes. The second digit selects per‐ missions for the user who owns the file: read (4), write (2), and execute (1); the third selects permissions for other users in the file's group, with the same values; and the fourth for other users not in the file's group, with the same values.

share|improve this answer
    
Please See the updates in question. –  Aryan Feb 21 '13 at 10:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.