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I wonder how to split a number on parts and then compare them to each other

For instance, I've got a set of numbers

 989010
 990009
 991008
 992992
 993006
 994005
 995004

and I want to divide each of numbers on two parts -->>

if it's 989010 -- it will be like '989' and '010'. 

After that, I think I can just compare two strings, right?

I mean,

   '989' != '010'  true
   '990' != '009'  true 
   '992' != '992'  false

it seems I should use the split function, however I confused how to separate only on two parts rather than more

Thanks in advance!

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In your case a simple substring() would do the job. For comparing, look at How do I compare strings in Java –  jlordo Feb 19 '13 at 8:45
2  
Do all numbers have 6 digits or it may vary ? –  giorashc Feb 19 '13 at 8:46
    
@giorashc yes, they do –  Leo Feb 19 '13 at 8:46
    
@Leo Can you show us what you tried ? –  Apurv Feb 19 '13 at 8:47
    
no, I can't. I faced this trouble when I was coding another part of program –  Leo Feb 19 '13 at 8:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
String str = "989010";

System.out.println(str.substring(0, 3).equals(str.substring(3,6)));
share|improve this answer
    
thanks) It works –  Leo Feb 19 '13 at 9:21

You could do this is several ways.

Either String.substring which would give you two strings or you could divide the numbers

int number = 123456;
int firstPart = number / 1000;
int secondPart = number - firstPart * 1000;

EDIT
Sorry for that - was in a rush.
To make up for it I will once again prove that any problem worth solving can be solved with the (often baffling) language of regex:

    final String[] strings = new String[]{"123123", "123456"};
    final Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("([\\d]{3})\\1");
    for (final String string : strings) {
        final Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(string);
        if (matcher.matches()) {
            System.out.println(string + " matches.");
        }
    }

Output:

run:
123123 matches.
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)

And it even takes 0 seconds, ha.

share|improve this answer
    
run your code and look at the output before posting. This would only work like this: int secondPart = number - firstPart * 1000; –  jlordo Feb 19 '13 at 8:52
    
123456/1000 == 123 != 123456-123 == 123333 –  Maroun Maroun Feb 19 '13 at 8:53
    
@MarounMaroun: No one else had this approach, so I fixed it for bmorris591 –  jlordo Feb 19 '13 at 8:56
    
@jlordo Now it works :) –  Maroun Maroun Feb 19 '13 at 8:57
    Long number = 989010L;
    String text = number.toString();
    String firstPart = text.substring(0,3);
    String secondPart = text.substring(3);

    Long firstNumber = Long.parseLong(firstPart);
    Long secondNumber = Long.parseLong(secondPart);

    System.out.println(firstNumber == secondNumber);
share|improve this answer

LOOK AT THIS

public static void main(String[] args) {

        String[] values = { "989010", "990009", "991008", "992992", "993006", "994005", "995004" };

        for(String value : values) {
            String firstPart = value.substring(0, 3);
            String secondPart = value.substring(3);
            if(firstPart.equals(secondPart)) {
                System.out.println(firstPart + " equals " + secondPart);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
`String s = "931492";
 int first = Integer.parseInt(s.substring(0, s.length()/2));
 int second = Integer.parseInt(s.substring(s.length()/2));
 if (first != second)
 {
    System.out.println("Not equal");
 }`

EDIT: Right i was comparing the wrong Substrings, sorry for that. Also you should use equals() when comparing Strings in Java. I updated my code to generate two Integer. Might provide additional comparing capabilities.

share|improve this answer
2  
== and != used on String - Compares references and not the content itself. They'll always be Not equal unless they point to the same String in the String pool. –  Maroun Maroun Feb 19 '13 at 9:00

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