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This is how my input looks like:

>a
AACTCTCTC
CGTGCTCTC
>b_random
ACTGSTSTS
CTCTCTCCT
ATATATA
>c
AACTCTCTC
CGTGCTCTC
>d
AACTCTCTC
CGTGCTCTC
CGTGCTCTC
>e_random
ACTGSTSTS
CTCTCTCCT
ATATATA
>c_random
ACTGSTSTS
CTCTCTACT
GSTSTSCTC
TCTCCTCCT
ATATATA

I would like to remove all sequences containing phrase "random" - sequence always starts with ">" and ends when another sequence starts.

In this case, I would like to get 3 files:

a.txt

>a
AACTCTCTC
CGTGCTCTC

c.txt

>c
AACTCTCTC
CGTGCTCTC

d.txt

>d
AACTCTCTC
CGTGCTCTC
CGTGCTCTC

Right now, I somehow can not force sed to do what I want. i started with this:

 sed 's/random.*random//g' sample_data

what is not working. Thank you very much.

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way to go here is probably with awk and a sensible RS/ORS setting:

awk '$1 !~ /random/ { print RS $0 > $1 ".txt"; close($1 ".txt" }' RS='>' ORS=''

If you have description lines with spaces in them, you need to set FS='\n' as well.

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Omg. It's brilliant. What can I do to write such scripts by myself when I grow up? Thank you very much. –  Perlnika Feb 19 '13 at 9:02
    
@Perlnika: Glad it works for you. To write such scripts you need practice. I've learned awk by reading tutorials (most recently this one), using it and studying how other people use it. –  Thor Feb 19 '13 at 9:17
    
Unfortunately this does not work with my biggest dataset: awk: program limit exceeded: maximum number of fields size=32767 (The file is of the size 3.4 GB) –  Perlnika Feb 19 '13 at 10:17
    
@Perlnika: Which version of awk are you using? Does setting FS='\n' help? –  Thor Feb 19 '13 at 11:42
    
@Perlnika: It probably will not, using a recent version of GNU awk might. Otherwise use an approach that only reads one line at a time as steve's and srathi's answers do. –  Thor Feb 19 '13 at 11:46
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Here's one way using awk that should handle large files:

awk '/^>/ { i=substr($0,2) } i ~ /random/ { i="" } i { print > i ".txt" }' file

Results of grep . *.txt:

a.txt:>a
a.txt:AACTCTCTC
a.txt:CGTGCTCTC
c.txt:>c
c.txt:AACTCTCTC
c.txt:CGTGCTCTC
d.txt:>d
d.txt:AACTCTCTC
d.txt:CGTGCTCTC
d.txt:CGTGCTCTC
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Thank you very much, this is working :-) I can immediately see newly created files. –  Perlnika Feb 19 '13 at 11:32
1  
You might want to close opened files along the way, so as not to run out of file descriptors. I think an if(i) close(i ".txt") in the /^>/ block should do. –  Thor Feb 19 '13 at 11:50
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awk '/\>/ && $0!~/random/{file=substr($0,2)".txt";f=1}{if($0~/random/)f=0;if(f)print>file}' your_file
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Another awk without using RS to avoid limitations

awk -F\> '/>/{close(f); f=/random/?x:$2 ".txt"} f{print>f}' file

This version also closes the file and uses a variable for the file name, because some awks cannot handle concatenated print targets.

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