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Final Solution:

public class UpdateUser
{
    public IEnumerable<string> SelectedRoles { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> DropDownRoles { get; set; }
}

...

var roles = context.Roles.Select(x => x.RoleName).ToList();
UpdateUser userToUpdate = new UpdateUser
{
    SelectedRoles = user.Roles.Select(x => x.RoleName),
    DropDownRoles = new SelectList(roles, user.Roles)
};

HTML

@Html.ListBoxFor(x => x.SelectedRoles, Model.DropDownRoles)

=========================

I have a droplist to display user roles like so:

HTML

    @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Roles)
    @Html.DropDownList( "roles", ViewData["roles"] as SelectList)

Controller

var user = context.Users.Include(x => x.Roles).Where(x => x.UserId == id).FirstOrDefault();
ViewData["roles"] = new SelectList(context.Roles, "RoleId", "RoleName");

The problem is that I can't figure how I could set the selected value in the drop down. I thought maybe I could use Lambda Expression to put the matching role at the top of the list then the rest in alphabetical order.

        var roles = context.Roles
            .ToList()
            .OrderBy( ? matching role then other selectable roles ?)

Must be an easier way?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't use the same value as the ViewData key and the selected value for the dropdown. Try like this:

@Html.DropDownList("selectedRole", ViewData["roles"] as SelectList)

and then your POST controller action could take this as parameter:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index(string selectedRole)
{
    ...
}

and if you have other fields inside your form, you could group them in a view model:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public string SelectedRole { get; set; }
    public string SomeOtherField { get; set; }
}

and then have your controller action take this view model as parameter. And since now you have a view model let's take full advantage of it and get rid of the dreaded weakly typed ViewData:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public string SelectedRole { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Roles { get; set; }

    public string SomeOtherField { get; set; }
    public string YetAnotherField { get; set; }
}

and then you could have the GET action populate this view model:

public ActionResult Index()
{
    var model = new MyViewModel();
    model.Roles = new SelectList(context.Roles, "RoleId", "RoleName");
    return View(model);
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index(MyViewModel model)
{
    ...
}

and then your view could be strongly typed to the view model:

@model MyViewModel
@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    ...
    @Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedRole, Model.Roles)
    ...
    <button type="submit">OK</button>
}
share|improve this answer
    
What about if a user has more than 1 role? public IEnumerable<string> SelectedRole { get; set; } So, for each user role, we have a new drop down list. – user1883004 Feb 19 '13 at 9:58
    
Precisely: public IEnumerable<string> SelectedRoles { get; set; }. And then use a Html.ListBoxFor(x => x.SelectedRoles, Model.Roles) instead of a Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedRole, Model.Roles) in your view in order to allow multiple selection. – Darin Dimitrov Feb 19 '13 at 9:59
    
Thanks for the help so far, almost there, I just need to set the selected values, Let me edit OP. – user1883004 Feb 19 '13 at 10:13
    
You should set the SelectedRoles property, not the Roles: model.SelectedRoles = user.Roles. The Roles property should contain all roles that need to be shown in your listbox. I don't know what the user.Roles type is from the previous example but it should be a list of strings. Otherwise you might need to select the corresponding value: model.SelectedRoles = user.Roles.Select(x => x.RoleName). – Darin Dimitrov Feb 19 '13 at 10:15
    
Oh I see the problem, I'm using a Role object rather than a string... – user1883004 Feb 19 '13 at 10:20

Darin's answer is complete and clear, it helped me in my search. However, I just had to make one more addition for the strongly typed view. In my project I fill a SelectList with certain roles for a certain user. These roles have been stored in a database. When editing (altering the user properties including this role), I would like to have the initially configured role displayed as the selected value.

To do so, just complete Darin his answer by adjusting one more thing to the view (I left out my own model, but it is almost the same as you may figure out from the example):

model MyViewModel
@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    ...
    @{
      var selectedItem = Model.Roles.Where(role => role.Value.AsInt().Equals(...).FirstOrDefault();
      var selectedText = selectedItem != null ? selectedItem.Text : null; 
      Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedRole, Model.Roles, selectedText)
    }

    ...
    <button type="submit">OK</button>
}

The selectedText is considered being an optionLabel as described here , which will always put the currently selected value within the dropdownlist first.

Perhaps a tiny bit late, but I do hope it might help out others :)

share|improve this answer

The SelectList contains a list of SelectListItem objects, each of which has a Selected property. So you could do something like:

var user = context.Users.Include(x => x.Roles).Where(x => x.UserId == id).FirstOrDefault();
var temp = new SelectList(context.Roles, "RoleId", "RoleName");
temp.First(x => x.Value.Equals(IdOfSelectedObject)).Selected = true;
ViewData["roles"] = temp;
share|improve this answer

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