Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here I have two run methods which should synchronize each other.

Poller Class:

     */
public void run() {
    int seqId = 0;
    while(true) {
    List<KpiMessage> list = null;

        try{
            if(!accumulator.isUsed){                
                try {
                    list = fullPoll(seqId);

                    if (!list.isEmpty()) {
                        seqId = list.get(0).getSequence();
                        accumulator.manageIngoing(list);
                    }
                    System.out.println("Updated");                      
                    wait(); 
                } catch (Exception e1) {
                    e1.printStackTrace();

                }
            }

        } catch (Exception e){
            // TODO:
            System.err.println(e.getMessage());
            e.printStackTrace();                
        }
    }

}


/**
 * Method which defines polling of the database and also count the number of Queries
 * @param lastSeq 
 * @return pojo col
 * @throws Exception
 */
public List<KpiMessage> fullPoll(int lastSeq) throws Exception {
    Statement st = dbConnection.createStatement();
    System.out.println("Polling");
    ResultSet rs = st.executeQuery("Select * from msg_new_to_bde where ACTION = 814 and 
    STATUS = 200 order by SEQ DESC");
    List<KpiMessage> pojoCol = new ArrayList<KpiMessage>();
    try {


        while (rs.next()) {
            KpiMessage filedClass = convertRecordsetToPojo(rs);
            pojoCol.add(filedClass);
        }

        for (KpiMessage pojoClass : pojoCol) {
            System.out.print(" " + pojoClass.getSequence());
            System.out.print(" " + pojoClass.getTableName());
            System.out.print(" " + pojoClass.getAction());
            System.out.print(" " + pojoClass.getKeyInfo1());
            System.out.print(" " + pojoClass.getKeyInfo2());
            System.out.print(" "+ pojoClass.getStatus());
            System.out.println(" " + pojoClass.getEntryTime());

        }


    } finally  {
        try {
            st.close();
            rs.close();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println(e.getMessage());
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }       

Processing and Updating Class:

        public void run() {
    while(true){
        try {
            while(!accumulator.isUsed)
            {
                try {
                System.out.println("Waiting for new outgoingmessages"); 
                    this.wait();
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
     Collection<KpiMessage> outgoingQueue = generate(accumulator.outgoingQueue); 
            accumulator.manageOutgoing(outgoingQueue, dbConnection);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println(e.getMessage());
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
}   

I have a logical error:

The poller is polling not only for new messsage but also reads the DB again and again from the first.

Also Updates again and again.

How to solve this synchronization problem.

share|improve this question
3  
You should only include the required part of the code and not dump the whole program. Update db method has nothing to do with IllegalMonitorStateException –  Narendra Pathai Feb 19 '13 at 9:06
    
@NarendraPathai I have updated... –  Babu Feb 19 '13 at 9:29
1  
OP had the same question before: stackoverflow.com/questions/14772236/… –  Ralf H Feb 19 '13 at 10:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Alternatively you could use a BlockingQueue to transfer the data between threads.

See BlockingQueue for details.

// The end of the list.
private static final Integer End = -1;

static class Producer implements Runnable {
  final Queue<Integer> queue;
  private int i = 0;

  public Producer(Queue<Integer> queue) {
    this.queue = queue;
  }

  @Override
  public void run() {
    try {
      for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        queue.add(i++);
        Thread.sleep(1);
      }
      // Finish the queue.
      queue.add(End);
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
      // Just exit.
    }
  }
}

static class Consumer implements Runnable {
  final Queue<Integer> queue;
  private int i = 0;

  public Consumer(Queue<Integer> queue) {
    this.queue = queue;
  }

  @Override
  public void run() {
    boolean ended = false;
    while (!ended) {
      Integer i = queue.poll();
      if ( i != null ) {
        ended = i == End;
        System.out.println(i);
      }
    }
  }
}

public void test() throws InterruptedException {
  Queue queue = new LinkedBlockingQueue();
  Producer p = new Producer(queue);
  Consumer c = new Consumer(queue);
  Thread pt = new Thread(p);
  Thread ct = new Thread(c);
  // Start it all going.
  pt.start();
  ct.start();
  // Close it down
  pt.join();
  ct.join();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Is this like fork join pool, because here am using Thread pool.. and my code keeps on updating again and again, and the poller not only reads the new message but also polls from the first... –  Babu Feb 19 '13 at 9:32
1  
ForkJoinPool is a feature of Java 7. This code does not make use of it. All this code is doing is demonstrating how simple it is to use a BlockingQueue to communicate between two threads. Using wait/notify is not just far more complex it is a minefield of caveats and dangers. –  OldCurmudgeon Feb 19 '13 at 9:41
    
" Wait/notify is minefield" - truely said, I will try implementing Blocking queue and return back thank you... –  Babu Feb 19 '13 at 9:47
1  
In stackoverflow.com/questions/14772236/… some people told you how to avoid IllegalMonitorStateExceptions. Maybe you should look at the higher-level classes in java.util.concurrent, too. BlockingQueues are already implemented there. –  Ralf H Feb 19 '13 at 10:14
1  
Ah OK, in that case maybe edit the question for clarity. –  Ralf H Feb 19 '13 at 10:48

You should synchronize or rather hold the lock or monitor for the object that you are calling wait() or notify() on.

Here is what will help you : wait() throwing IllegalArgumentException

synchronized(lockObject){

     lockObject.wait(); //you should hold the lock to be able to call wait()
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you ,is it like I add Synchronized(lockObject) instead of normal wait. –  Babu Feb 19 '13 at 9:33
    
Is the name of lockOject correspond to the name of thread for first run method. –  Babu Feb 19 '13 at 9:36
    
No. you will have a single object that will be shared among all the threads and all will lock the object and call wait on that object. And one thread will lock and call notify on the same object. The name of lock has nothing to do with the name of the thread. You should read basic threading tutorials. –  Narendra Pathai Feb 19 '13 at 14:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.