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I am working on a report module that shows the time spent and number of tasks. The values are set in the Java Bean and the bean object is stored in a array.I am using separate queries to get time and number of tasks.Now i have to sort the array based on time and number of tasks. The code below compares only Strings:

if (!list.isEmpty()) {
    Collections.sort(list, new Comparator<Project>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(Project p1, Project p2) {

            return p1.getName().compare(p2.getName());
        }
       });
   }

I have problems in sorting the integer value of a property in JavaBean which is stored in an array.Any help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Are you tying to sort integer array, you can use Arrays.sort(int[] a) –  User 104 Feb 19 '13 at 9:26
    
So what's array look like ? –  Jason Feb 19 '13 at 9:26
    
Integer and Date both also have a compareTo method, can't you use them? –  sp00m Feb 19 '13 at 9:28
    
@Jason: Project[] array = new Project[3]; I am setting the integer value in a property of Project object and then I am storing the project object in the array. This is what you are asking, right? –  santhosh Feb 19 '13 at 9:38
    
why you should not storing project in the list ? That's easy to sort. –  Jason Feb 19 '13 at 9:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your comments below the question you say you have:

Project[] array = new Project[3];

If I were you I'd declare Project as

public class Project implements Comparable<Project> {

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Project other) {
        return this.id - other.id; // or whatever property you want to sort
    }

Then you can sort your array by simply calling

Arrays.sort(array);

If you don't want your class to implement the Comparable interface you can pass a comparator to Arrays.sort():

    Arrays.sort(array, new Comparator<Project>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(Project o1, Project o2) {
            return o1.id - o2.id; // or whatever property you want to sort
        }
    });

I used an anonymous one, you could also extract it to it's own class if needed elsewhere.

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Exactly what i searched for...Thank jlordo for the great help.. –  santhosh Feb 19 '13 at 10:17

try this to sort integers

return(p1.getIntProperty() - p2.getIntProperty());
share|improve this answer

Did you look into the Comparator and Comparable interfaces in java. You can use the compare() method to compare the elements in the array and sort them accordingly. You check this post where same question is already answerd Sort Java Collection

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How about something like:

Project[] project = ..initialise array;

List<Project> projectList = Arrays.asList(project);
Collections.sort(projectList, new Comparator<Project>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Project p1, Project p2) {
        if(p1.getIntProperty() == p2.getIntProperty()) return 0;
        return p1.getIntProperty() > p2.getIntProperty() ? 1 : -1;
    }
   });
}
share|improve this answer
1  
what's happen if two values equal ? –  Jason Feb 19 '13 at 9:28
2  
And what if both values are equal? You never return 0. –  Rohit Jain Feb 19 '13 at 9:28
    
What about equality ? –  Christophe Roussy Feb 19 '13 at 9:29
    
Updated, wouldve done the job anyway, but seems people dont like it not returning 0. Personally I like the 1 liner –  cowls Feb 19 '13 at 9:32
    
Why convert it to a list, if you can simply sort the array? –  jlordo Feb 19 '13 at 9:54

You can pass a comparator to Arrays.sort():

Arrays.sort(array, new Comparator<Project>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Project o1, Project o2) {
        return o1.id - o2.id; // or whatever property you want to sort
    }
});
share|improve this answer

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