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I am trying to implement an interface in Java to use different types of databases for one application. My though was to create an abstract class with the common interface and two static variables which are then overwritten by the subclasses. I then wanted to add a Class[] List with the classes of all available subclasses to the abstract class as well as a couple of functions that allow the determination of the correct class to be used.

The goal is to first get a list of all available database types and let the user choose one. Afterwards another function should translate the name (which could be localized) to the IDENTIFIER which is specified in the subclass. Finally a third function allows the instantiation of an object by giving such an IDENTIFIER.

My abstract class would look something like this:

public abstract class DataBase {
    public static final IDENTIFIER = "";
    public static final NAME = "";
    private static final Class[] dbTypes = new Class[]{PostgreSQL.class, MySQL.class};

    public static String[] getNameList() {
        String[] names = new String[dbTypes.length];
        for(int i = 0; i < dbTypes.length; i++){
            names[i] = dbTypes[i].NAME;       //Cannot access the static variable this way.
        }
        return names;
    }
    public static String getIdentifierForName(String name) {
        for(int i = 0; i < dbTypes.length; i++){
            if(name.equals(dbTypes[i].NAME){       
                return dbTypes[i].IDENTIFIER;
            }
        }
        return "";
    }
    public static DataBase getInstanceOf(String identifier) {
        for(int i = 0; i < dbTypes.length; i++){
            if(identifier.equals(dbTypes[i].IDENTIFIER) {       
                return dbTypes[i].newInstance();
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}

The Child classes would look something like this:

public class MySQL extends DataBase {
    public static final IDENTIFIER = "ab.cde.MySQL";
    public static final NAME = "MySQL";
    ...
}
public class PostgreSQL extends DataBase{
    public static final IDENTIFIER = "ab.cde.PostgreSQL";
    public static final NAME = "PostgreSQL";
    ...
}

My problem now is, that I cannot access the static variables from the Class object. Obviously the dbTypes list does not contain any typed classes. I tried changing the type of the Array to Class<? extends DataBase>, but I get an error Cannot create a generic array of Class<? extends DataBase> I also tried checking the classes with isAssignableFrom() and then casting the class, but I was still not able to access the static variables.

For now I have two solutions which are working:

  1. Hardcode all existing subclasses into each function if(PostgreSQL.NAME.equals(name)){...}etc. However, if I add new subclasses, I only want to have to add them at one point in my implementation.

  2. Instead of using a Class[] array, I can use an array of DataBase[] with instances of each class. However, I would think this is bad practice to instantiate each available DataBase subclass, even though I only need one in the end.

Since I have never done such a thing before I might also be approaching the problem completely wrong. Maybe I am missing the correct way in which something like this is usually done?

Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question
    
Why not use inheritance? class MySQLDatabase extends Database? –  amn Feb 19 '13 at 9:53
    
Thanks for the tip. I am actually using inheritance, just forgot to add the extends DataBase in my example –  Tim Schneider Feb 19 '13 at 14:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use reflection to get values for each class:

public static String[] getNameList(){
    String[] names = new String[dbTypes.length];
    for(int i=0; i<dbTypes.length; i++){
        Field f = dbTypes[i].getField("NAME");
        names[i] = f.get(null);
    }
    return names;
}

But it might be slow.

Also I'd suggest to create separate enum DBRegistry that will contain names, identifiers and classes:

public enum DBRegistry {
   MYSQL("ab.cde.MySQL", "MySQL", MySQL.class),
   POSTGRESQL("ab.cde.PostgreSQL", "PostgreSQL", PostgreSQL.class);

   private String name;
   private String identifier;
   private Class<?> dbClass;

   private DBRegistry(String identifier, String name, Class<?> dbClass) {
       this.identifier = identifier;
       this.name = name;
       this.dbClass = dbClass;
   }
   // Getters...
}

You can iterate on all items in registry using DBRegistry.values

share|improve this answer
    
That solution is rather convoluted. Being an enum means that it cannot be extended, and using reflection introduce "hidden contracts" that could have been made explicit (and compiler-verifiable) by declaring abstract methods as suggested by @gd1 –  Javier Feb 19 '13 at 9:43
    
@Javier every solution has some drawbacks. Why do you want to extend enum in this case? It's not meant to be extended here. I don't like abstract methods because OP may need to use dbs name and identifiers without creating instances of classes and you can't do it without instantiating them. –  Nikita Beloglazov Feb 19 '13 at 9:46
    
@Javier : my "abstract methods" solution does not exactly fit with what the OP asked, which is convoluted inherently. In fact I proposed another solution which is convoluted as well but I hope slightly better than Nikita's one. However, I wouldn't downvote Nikita. –  gd1 Feb 19 '13 at 9:46
    
@NikitaBeloglazov I dont want to "extend the enum", but I want to be able to add new databases. With your approach the DataBase class (which is of generic purpose) is tied to the implementation specific constants defined in DBRegistry. –  Javier Feb 19 '13 at 9:55
    
@Javier : this "mistake" originates from the OP approach. –  gd1 Feb 19 '13 at 9:56

There are no "abstract properties" in Java. You have to create two astract methods in the DataBase class, like this:

public abstract class DataBase {

    // No "abstract propeties"

    public abstract String getDBName();
    public abstract String getDBIdentifier();

    // etc etc...

}

and then, in each subclass:

public class MySQL extends DataBase {

    public static final IDENTIFIER = "ab.cde.MySQL";
    public static final NAME = "MySQL";

    @Override
    public String getDBName() {
       return NAME;
    }

    @Override
    public String getDBIdentifier() {
       return IDENTIFIER;
    }

    // etc etc...

}

When using the classes, you can just cast to DataBase (not MySQL or PostgreSQL) and call the two abstract methods.

Therefore, in order to solve your "pick a database class" problem, I would create a configuration file that contains the names of the databases and the corresponding class, and instantiate it with reflection (newInstance()) as needed.

As an alternative, you can use reflection to access the static variables like Nikita's answers suggested, or you can just use the name of the class as the identifier of the database it supports, like this (not tested):

public abstract class DataBase {

    private static final Class[] dbTypes = new Class[]{PostgreSQL.class, MySQL.class};

    public static Class getDBClass(String type) {
       for (Class c : dbTypes) {
           if (c.getSimpleName().toLowerCase().equals(type.toLowerCase())) {
               return c;
           }
       }
       return null;
    }

    public static Set<String> getSupportedDB() { // <-- you populate a dropdown menu with this
       Set<String> supported = new HashSet<String>();
       for (Class c : dbTypes) {
           supported.add(c.getSimpleName());
       }
       return supported;
    }

    // etc etc...

}

However, I don't like this solution and I would not use it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I'm not quite sure if this solves my problem. By using the two methods getDBNameand getDBIdentifier, like you suggested, I still need to instantiate the class, before I can read out the needed values, correct? I am trying to avoid instantiating each class to determine which one I need. Instead I would like to determine the correct class beforehand and then instantiate it. –  Tim Schneider Feb 19 '13 at 14:37
    
So consider my second suggestion (from "as an alternative")... –  gd1 Feb 20 '13 at 0:04

Not tested, but I would suggest something like this. You could register databases by calling DataBase.registerDataBase(new DataBase(...))); which may be invoked from the main file.

    public class DataBase {
          private final static List<DataBase> INSTANCES = new ArrayList<DataBase>();
          private final String identifier;
          private final String name;
          private final Class<?> dbType;
          public DataBase(String identifier, String name, Class<?> dbType) {
           this.identifier=identifier.toString();
           this.name=name.toString();
           this.dbType=dbType;         
          }

          String getIdentifier() {return identifier;}
          String getName()       {return identifier;}
          Class<?> getDbType()   {return dbtype;}

          public synchronized static void registerDatabase(DataBase database) {
            database.getClass();
            INSTANCES.add(database);
            //may check if already registered and either fail or replace it
          }

          public synchronized static List<DataBase> getNameList() {
            return new ArrayList<DataBase>(INSTANCES);
          }

          public synchronized static List<String> getNameList() {
            List<String> names = new ArrayList<String>(INSTANCES.size());
            for (Database db:INSTANCES) names.add(db.getName());
            return names;
          }

          public synchronized static String getIdentifierForName(String name) {       
                for(DataBase db:INSTANCES){
                    if(name.equals(db.getName())) return db;
                }           
            return null;
          }

          public synchronized static DataBase getInstanceOf(String identifier) {
            for(DataBase db:INSTANCES){
                    if(identifier.equals(db.getIdentifier())) return db;
                }           
            return null;
          }
        }
}
share|improve this answer

I would advise to keep it simple, never more than necessary to utilize in the actual application. It is easier to extend things than to re-factor code to accomodate for additional complexity. Most of the stuff you mention are merely artefacts of your problem solving, not the actual requirements of your application per se. And it so happens, that a modern object-oriented language has everything you need, and you can implement a good design without reflection and without resorting to static properties and string identifiers.

Remember to rely on the compiler rather than runtime for whatever you know in advance - anything that is known not to change from one application run to another, does not need reflection, because it does not involve runtime variables! I would go for interfaces, classes implementing them, and more importantly the Factory pattern to abstract using these classes:

interface Database
{
    void query(String sqlString);
}

class MySQLDatabase implements Database
{
    public void query(String sqlString)
    {

    }
}

class PostgreSQLDatabase implements Database
{
    public void query(String sqlString)
    {

    }
}

class DatabaseFactory
{
    Database connectDatabase()
    {
        /// F.e. return new MySQLDatabase();
    }
}

The whole "database abstraction layer" has been done to death already anyway, giving birth to DBA, ODBC and other software stacks that solve your problem. You should let yourself be inspired by these, unless you are sure your particular way of solving this yields advantages that can be proven. If you want to go about this in a professional way, of course. If you want to educate yourself, by all means, use reflection, strings in place of more specific objects, and tight-coupling instead of aggressive modularity.

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