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I want to create a div that can change its width/height as the window's width changes.

Are there any CSS3 rules that would allow the height to change according to the width, while maintaining its aspect ratio?

I know I can do this via JavaScript, but I would prefer using only CSS.

div keeping aspect ratio according to width of window

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12 Answers 12

up vote 447 down vote accepted

Just create a wrapper <div> with a percentage value for padding-bottom, like this:

div {
  width: 100%;
  padding-bottom: 75%;
  background:gold; /** <-- For the demo **/
}
<div></div>

It will result in a <div> with height equal to 75% of the width of its container (a 4:3 aspect ratio).

This relies on the fact that for padding :

The percentage is calculated with respect to the width of the generated box's containing block [...] (source: w3.org, emphasis mine)

Padding-bottom values for other aspect ratios and 100% width :

aspect ratio  | padding-bottom value
--------------|----------------------
    16:9      |       56.25%
    4:3       |       75%
    3:2       |       66.66%
    8:5       |       62.5%

Placing content in the div :

In order to keep the aspect ratio of the div and prevent it's content from stretching it, you need to add an absolutely positioned child and stretch it to the edges of the wrapper with:

div.stretchy-wrapper {
  position: relative;
}

div.stretchy-wrapper > div {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; right: 0;
}

Here's a demo and another more in depth demo

share|improve this answer
12  
@schellmax, it is because padding % is calculated relative to the current element's width, where as height % is calculated relative to the parent element's height. Furthermore, absolute positions are calculated relative to the outside container of an element, which includes the padding area. For more information Google "CSS Box Model" – Anson Kao Sep 17 '12 at 20:33
7  
This does not seem to work in a nested fashion. It works at the first level, but when trying to do the same thing inside of the div maintaining aspect ratio, the padding-bottom percentage seems to get applied to the width of the parent. here is an example where the .stretchy-wrap.onethird padding-bottom of 25% is actually 25% of the parent width. Can someone explain this? – Misterparker Feb 8 '13 at 15:53
1  
Totally awesome. It's killing me that this technique won't work when you want to fix the height at 100%. @Misterparker, the technique relies on the width and padding calculations being performed against the same reference; you can't use a width smaller than 100%, as you have in your example. – steveluscher Feb 20 '13 at 0:54
    
@Misterparker Yes, percentage padding is calculated in proportion to the parent element's width. See the more in depth example I posted in an edit to my answer. My updated demo demonstrates a 'nested fashion' as you were speaking of. – Web_Designer Feb 20 '13 at 4:21
2  
the fact that he has demonstrated that this works is enough to convince me that this is the best answer ive yet seen on SO. shout out to my man @Web_Designer – user595349 Oct 16 '13 at 22:47

vw units :

You can use vw units for the width and height of the element.
This allows to keep the element's aspect ratio according to the viewport width (Note : you can also see vh if you need to keep aspect ratio according to viewport height).

vw : 1/100th of the width of the viewport. [MDN]

Example for a 1:1 aspect ratio :

div{
  width: 20vw;
  height:20vw;
  background:gold;
}
<div></div>

For other aspect ratios, you can use the following table to calculate the value for height according to the width of the element :

aspect ratio  |  multiply width by
-----------------------------------
     1:1      |         1
     1:3      |         3
     4:3      |        0.75
    16:9      |       0.5625

Here is an example for a 4x4 grid of square divs :

DEMO

HTML :

<div></div>
... 16 divs ...

CSS :

div {
    width:24%;
    height:24vw;
    margin:0.5%;
    background:gold;
    float:left;
}

div {
    width:24%;
    height:24vw;
    margin:0.5%;
    background:gold;
    float:left;
}
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>
<div></div>


These units also allow you to keep the aspect ratio of an element according to width and height while always fitting in the viewport see fit and center a responsive square in viewport.


Browser support for vh/vw units is IE9+ see canIuse for more info

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9  
How am I only seeing this now... – Isaac May 15 '14 at 9:40
3  
This is fantastic! - Good answer, a very neat and elegant solution. – Kolors Aug 5 '14 at 13:50
4  
This should be the accepted answer. Perhaps not now, but in the future. vw units are supported in most browsers now. – aug Jan 23 '15 at 5:44
1  
@vivekmaharajh both techniques are good, each one has it's own pros and cons. Using one or the other depends greatly on the situation. – web-tiki Apr 22 '15 at 11:46
1  
Thanks for introducing a use case for the "new" size units! – Tormod Haugene Aug 25 '15 at 6:12

I've found a way to do this using CSS, but you have to be careful as it may change depending on the flow of your own web site. I've done it in order to embed video with a constant aspect ratio within a fluid width portion of my web site.

Say you have an embedded video like this:

<object>
     <param ... /><param ... />...
     <embed src="..." ...</embed>
</object>

You could then place this all inside a div with a "video" class. This video class will probably be the fluid element in your website such that, by itself, it has no direct height constraints, but when you resize the browser it will change in width according to the flow of the web site. This would be the element you are probably trying to get your embedded video in while maintaining a certain aspect ratio of the video.

In order to do this, I put an image before the embedded object within the "video" class div.

!!! The important part is that the image has the correct aspect ratio you wish to maintain. Also, make sure the size of the image is AT LEAST as big as the smallest you expect the video (or whatever you are maintaining the A.R. of) to get based on your layout. This will avoid any potential issues in the resolution of the image when it is percentage-resized. For example, if you wanted to maintain an aspect ratio of 3:2, don't just use a 3px by 2px image. It may work under some circumstances, but I haven't tested it, and it would probably be a good idea to avoid.

You should probably already have a minimum width like this defined for fluid elements of your web site. If not, it is a good idea to do so in order to avoid chopping elements off or having overlap when the browser window gets too small. It is better to have a scroll bar at some point. The smallest in width a web page should get is somewhere around ~600px (including any fixed width columns) because screen resolutions don't come smaller unless you are dealing with phone-friendly sites. !!!

I use a completely transparent png but I don't really think it ends up mattering if you do it right. Like this:

<div class="video">
     <img class="maintainaspectratio" src="maintainaspectratio.png" />
     <object>
          <param ... /><param ... />...
          <embed src="..." ...</embed>
     </object>
</div>

Now you should be able to add CSS similar to the following:

div.video { ...; position: relative; }
div.video img.maintainaspectratio { width: 100%; }
div.video object { position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; width: 100%; height: 100%; }
div.video embed {width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Make sure you also remove any explicit height or width declaration within the object and embed tags that usually come with copy/pasted embed code.

The way it works depends on the position properties of the video class element and the item you want have maintain a certain aspect ratio. It takes advantage of the way an image will maintain its proper aspect ratio when resized in an element. It tells whatever else is in video class element to take full-advantage of the real estate provided by the dynamic image by forcing its width/height to 100% of the video class element being adjusted by the image.

Pretty cool, eh?

You might have to play around with it a bit to get it to work with your own design, but this actually works surprisingly well for me. The general concept is there.

share|improve this answer
    
Great idea! I'm going to use this for my project, thanks! – Samuel Cole Mar 4 '11 at 17:26
    
This seems to work really well, as far as I've tested it. It still feels like a bit of a hack, but I can't think of any reason why we can't rely on this behavior, and it's pretty simple to implement. – Doug Kavendek Jun 20 '12 at 18:11
    
+1 That is cool. And compared to the accepted answer it handles nested divs well too. Btw, instead of a transparent image one can set it invisible via css. – robert Apr 4 '13 at 16:27
    
I'm using this idea and it's working great! Thanks and +1 from me. – Stijn de Witt Jun 20 '15 at 13:49

To add to Web_Designer's answer, the <div> will have a height (entirely made up of bottom padding) of 75% of the width of it's containing element. Here's a good summary: http://mattsnider.com/css-using-percent-for-margin-and-padding/. I'm not sure why this should be so, but that's how it is.

If you want your div to be a width other than 100%, you need another wrapping div on which to set the width:

div.ar-outer{
    width: 60%; /* container; whatever width you want */
    margin: 0 auto; /* centered if you like */
}
div.ar {
    width:100%; /* 100% of width of container */
    padding-bottom: 75%; /* 75% of width of container */
    position:relative;
}
div.ar-inner {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; right: 0;
}

I used something similar to Elliot's image trick recently to allow me to use CSS media queries to serve a different logo file depending on device resolution, but still scale proportionally as an <img> would naturally do (I set the logo as background image to a transparent .png with the correct aspect ratio). But Web_Designer's solution would save me an http request.

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+1 Percentage padding is weird. :) – Web_Designer May 15 '12 at 0:29
    
I just used this to display our logo on a mobile site and it works beautifully. I encoded my bg image as a data:uri so I'm saving on http requests and anywhere I need a logo I just add my little snippet of divs, and the css takes care of the rest. – nabrown78 Jun 20 '12 at 14:29

Elliot inspired me to this solution - thanks:

aspectratio.png is a completely transparent PNG-file with the size of your preferred aspect-ratio, in my case 30x10 pixels.

HTML

<div class="eyecatcher">
  <img src="/img/aspectratio.png"/>
</div>

CSS3

.eyecatcher img {
  width: 100%;
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-size: 100% 100%;
  background-image: url(../img/autoresized-picture.jpg);
}

Please note: background-size is a css3-feature which might not work with your target-browsers. You may check interoperability (f.e. on caniuse.com).

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Oh and it works pretty well with css-media-queries.. You'd like to use it for responsive designs. – florianb Jul 7 '12 at 14:31

As stated in here on w3schools.com and somewhat reiterated in this accepted answer, padding values as percentages (emphasis mine):

Specifies the padding in percent of the width of the containing element

Ergo, a correct example of a responsive DIV that keeps a 16:9 aspect ratio is as follows:

CSS

.parent {
    position: relative;
    width: 100%;
}
.child {
    position: relative;
    padding-bottom: calc(100% * 9 / 16);
}
.child > div {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
}

HTML

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">
        <div>Aspect is kept when resizing</div>
    </div>
</div>

Demo on JSFiddle

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I used a new solution.

.squares{
  width: 30vw
  height: 30vw

To main aspect ratio

.aspect-ratio
  width: 10vw
  height: 10vh

However, this is relative to the entire viewport. So, if you need a div that is 30% of the viewport width, you can use 30vw instead, and since you know the width, you reuse them in height using calc and vw unit. I made a small proof

Squares - Helper classes to make bootstrap columns square

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Isn't this exactly what the second-highest rated answer already outlined? – rnevius Jan 29 at 13:01

Basing on your solutions I've made some trick:

When you use it your HTML will be only

<div keep-ratio="75%">
    <div>Main content</div>
</div>

To use it this way make: CSS:

*[keep-ratio] {
    display: block;
    position: relative;
}
*[keep-ratio] > * {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
}

and js (jQuery)

$('*[keep-ratio]').each(function(){ 
    var ratio = $(this).attr('keep-ratio');                 
    $(this).css('width', '100%').css('padding-bottom', ratio);
});

And having this you just set attr keep-ratio beeing % ratio height/width and thats it

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SCSS is the best solution in my case; using a data attribute :

[data-aspect-ratio] {
    display: block;
    max-width: 100%;
    position: relative;

    &:before {
        content: '';
        display: block;
    }

    > * {
        display: block;
        height: 100%;
        left: 0;
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        width: 100%;
    }
}
[data-aspect-ratio="3:1"]:before {
    padding-top: 33.33%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="2:1"]:before {
    padding-top: 50%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="16:9"]:before {
    padding-top: 56.25%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="3:2"]:before {
    padding-top: 66.66%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="4:3"]:before {
    padding-top: 75%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="1:1"]:before {
    padding-top: 100%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="3:4"]:before {
    padding-top: 133.33%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="2:3"]:before {
    padding-top: 150%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="9:16"]:before {
    padding-top: 177.77%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="1:2"]:before {
    padding-top: 200%;
}
[data-aspect-ratio="1:3"]:before {
    padding-top: 300%;
}

For example :

<div data-aspect-ratio="16:9"><iframe ...></iframe></div>

source

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2  
Just FYI...You can do this exact thing (using attribute selectors) in exactly the same amount of lines using plain CSS. The [data-aspect-ratio] attribute selector is available to you in CSS. – rnevius Oct 23 '15 at 16:39

If the entire container structure was percentage based, this would be the default behavior, can you provide a more specific example?

Below is an example of what I mean, if your entire parent hierarchy was % based, any browser window adjustment would work without any additional js/css, is this not a possibility with your layout?

<div style="width: 100%;">
   <div style="width: 50%; margin: 0 auto;">Content</div>
</div>
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1  
See my edit to the original question. I don't see where this technique would keep the aspect ratio, the height would not change. – jackb Sep 30 '09 at 15:20

Just an idea or a hack.

div {
  background-color: blue;
  width: 10%;
  transition: background-color 0.5s, width 0.5s;
  font-size: 0;
}

div:hover {
  width: 20%;
  background-color: red;
}
  
img {
  width: 100%;
  height: auto;
  visibility: hidden;
}
<div>
  <!-- use an image with target aspect ratio. sample is a square -->
  <img src="http://i.imgur.com/9OPnZNk.png" />
</div>

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't a CSS-only solution...Now, if you would have used a base64 encoded image in a pseudo element, that would have been a cool solution. – rnevius Sep 30 '15 at 15:48
    
There's really no CSS-only solution. HTML is the basic component of web. I believe the purpose of the question is to refrain from using JS perhaps to save resource/processing. – Orland Sep 30 '15 at 15:49
    
I'm not sure if pseudo element will work. I utilized the property of img element to keep its aspect ratio for this solution to work. – Orland Sep 30 '15 at 16:02

You can also use the Background-size:cover; property to stretch the background image to completely cover the content area.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't have anything to do with setting the aspect ratio of the containing <div> though... – rnevius Sep 30 '15 at 15:48
    
This works against the point. cover stretches the image to fit the container. – JGallardo Dec 23 '15 at 7:41

protected by web-tiki May 15 '15 at 6:32

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