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I'm devising a file format for my application, and I'd obviously like for it to work on both big-endian and little-endian systems. I've already found working solutions for managing integral types using htonl and ntohl, but I'm a bit stuck when trying to do the same with float and double values.

Given the nature of how floating-point representations work, I would assume that the standard byte-order functions won't work on these values. Likewise, I'm not even entirely sure if endianness in the traditional sense is what governs the byte order of these types.

All I need is consistency. A way to write a double out, and ensure I get that same value when I read it back in. How can I do this in C?

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Saving it as text is not an option? –  qPCR4vir Feb 19 '13 at 9:33
    
@qPCR4vir That could kill a lot of performance. –  FUZxxl Feb 19 '13 at 9:45
    
Libraries such as HDF5 (hdfgroup.org/HDF5) take care of all that for you. I suspect HDF5 might be a bit heavyweight for your needs. –  High Performance Mark Feb 19 '13 at 9:51
    
As with any serialization problem: Specify a wire format, and then write writers and readers for each platform. I have a feeling that for at least one platform this will be trivial, and for the others it would need at most one byte swap. –  Kerrek SB Feb 19 '13 at 10:03
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Another option could be to use double frexp(double value, int *exp); from <math.h> (C99) to break down the floating-point value into a normalized fraction (in the range [0.5, 1)) and an integral power of 2. You can then multiply the fraction by FLT_RADIXDBL_MANT_DIG to get an integer in the range [FLT_RADIXDBL_MANT_DIG/2, FLT_RADIXDBL_MANT_DIG). Then you save both integers big- or little-endian, whichever you choose in your format.

When you load a saved number, you do the reverse operation and use double ldexp(double x, int exp); to multiply the reconstructed fraction by the power of 2.

This will work best when FLT_RADIX=2 (virtually all systems, I suppose?) and DBL_MANT_DIG<=64.

Care must be taken to avoid overflows.

Sample code for doubles:

#include <limits.h>
#include <float.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#if CHAR_BIT != 8
#error currently supported only CHAR_BIT = 8
#endif

#if FLT_RADIX != 2
#error currently supported only FLT_RADIX = 2
#endif

#ifndef M_PI
#define M_PI 3.14159265358979324
#endif

typedef unsigned char uint8;

/*
  10-byte little-endian serialized format for double:
  - normalized mantissa stored as 64-bit (8-byte) signed integer:
      negative range: (-2^53, -2^52]
      zero: 0
      positive range: [+2^52, +2^53)
  - 16-bit (2-byte) signed exponent:
      range: [-0x7FFE, +0x7FFE]

  Represented value = mantissa * 2^(exponent - 53)

  Special cases:
  - +infinity: mantissa = 0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF, exp = 0x7FFF
  - -infinity: mantissa = 0x8000000000000000, exp = 0x7FFF
  - NaN:       mantissa = 0x0000000000000000, exp = 0x7FFF
  - +/-0:      only one zero supported
*/

void Double2Bytes(uint8 buf[10], double x)
{
  double m;
  long long im; // at least 64 bits
  int ie;
  int i;

  if (isnan(x))
  {
    // NaN
    memcpy(buf, "\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00" "\xFF\x7F", 10);
    return;
  }
  else if (isinf(x))
  {
    if (signbit(x))
      // -inf
      memcpy(buf, "\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x80" "\xFF\x7F", 10);
    else
      // +inf
      memcpy(buf, "\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\x7F" "\xFF\x7F", 10);
    return;
  }

  // Split double into normalized mantissa (range: (-1, -0.5], 0, [+0.5, +1))
  // and base-2 exponent
  m = frexp(x, &ie); // x = m * 2^ie exactly for FLT_RADIX=2
                     // frexp() can't fail
  // Extract most significant 53 bits of mantissa as integer
  m = ldexp(m, 53); // can't overflow because
                    // DBL_MAX_10_EXP >= 37 equivalent to DBL_MAX_2_EXP >= 122
  im = trunc(m); // exact unless DBL_MANT_DIG > 53

  // If the exponent is too small or too big, reduce the number to 0 or
  // +/- infinity
  if (ie > 0x7FFE)
  {
    if (im < 0)
      // -inf
      memcpy(buf, "\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x80" "\xFF\x7F", 10);
    else
      // +inf
      memcpy(buf, "\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\x7F" "\xFF\x7F", 10);
    return;
  }
  else if (ie < -0x7FFE)
  {
    // 0
    memcpy(buf, "\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00" "\x00\x00", 10);
    return;
  }

  // Store im as signed 64-bit little-endian integer
  for (i = 0; i < 8; i++, im >>= 8)
    buf[i] = (uint8)im;

  // Store ie as signed 16-bit little-endian integer
  for (i = 8; i < 10; i++, ie >>= 8)
    buf[i] = (uint8)ie;
}

void Bytes2Double(double* x, const uint8 buf[10])
{
  unsigned long long uim; // at least 64 bits
  long long im; // ditto
  unsigned uie;
  int ie;
  double m;
  int i;
  int negative = 0;
  int maxe;

  if (!memcmp(buf, "\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00" "\xFF\x7F", 10))
  {
#ifdef NAN
    *x = NAN;
#else
    *x = 0; // NaN is not supported, use 0 instead (we could return an error)
#endif
    return;
  }

  if (!memcmp(buf, "\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x80" "\xFF\x7F", 10))
  {
    *x = -INFINITY;
    return;
  }
  else if (!memcmp(buf, "\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\x7F" "\xFF\x7F", 10))
  {
    *x = INFINITY;
    return;
  }

  // Load im as signed 64-bit little-endian integer
  uim = 0;
  for (i = 0; i < 8; i++)
  {
    uim >>= 8;
    uim |= (unsigned long long)buf[i] << (64 - 8);
  }
  if (uim <= 0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFLL)
    im = uim;
  else
    im = (long long)(uim - 0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFLL - 1) - 0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFLL - 1;

  // Obtain the absolute value of the mantissa, make sure it's
  // normalized and fits into 53 bits, else the input is invalid
  if (im > 0)
  {
    if (im < (1LL << 52) || im >= (1LL << 53))
    {
#ifdef NAN
      *x = NAN;
#else
      *x = 0; // NaN is not supported, use 0 instead (we could return an error)
#endif
      return;
    }
  }
  else if (im < 0)
  {
    if (im > -(1LL << 52) || im <= -(1LL << 53))
    {
#ifdef NAN
      *x = NAN;
#else
      *x = 0; // NaN is not supported, use 0 instead (we could return an error)
#endif
      return;
    }
    negative = 1;
    im = -im;
  }

  // Load ie as signed 16-bit little-endian integer
  uie = 0;
  for (i = 8; i < 10; i++)
  {
    uie >>= 8;
    uie |= (unsigned)buf[i] << (16 - 8);
  }
  if (uie <= 0x7FFF)
    ie = uie;
  else
    ie = (int)(uie - 0x7FFF - 1) - 0x7FFF - 1;

  // If DBL_MANT_DIG < 53, truncate the mantissa
  im >>= (53 > DBL_MANT_DIG) ? (53 - DBL_MANT_DIG) : 0;

  m = im;
  m = ldexp(m, (53 > DBL_MANT_DIG) ? -DBL_MANT_DIG : -53); // can't overflow
           // because DBL_MAX_10_EXP >= 37 equivalent to DBL_MAX_2_EXP >= 122

  // Find out the maximum base-2 exponent and
  // if ours is greater, return +/- infinity
  frexp(DBL_MAX, &maxe);
  if (ie > maxe)
    m = INFINITY;
  else
    m = ldexp(m, ie); // underflow may cause a floating-point exception

  *x = negative ? -m : m;
}

int test(double x, const char* name)
{
  uint8 buf[10], buf2[10];
  double x2;
  int error1, error2;

  Double2Bytes(buf, x);
  Bytes2Double(&x2, buf);
  Double2Bytes(buf2, x2);

  printf("%+.15E '%s' -> %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X  %02X %02X\n",
         x,
         name,
         buf[0],buf[1],buf[2],buf[3],buf[4],buf[5],buf[6],buf[7],buf[8],buf[9]);

  if ((error1 = memcmp(&x, &x2, sizeof(x))) != 0)
    puts("Bytes2Double(Double2Bytes(x)) != x");

  if ((error2 = memcmp(buf, buf2, sizeof(buf))) != 0)
    puts("Double2Bytes(Bytes2Double(Double2Bytes(x))) != Double2Bytes(x)");

  puts("");

  return error1 || error2;
}

int testInf(void)
{
  uint8 buf[10];
  double x, x2;
  int error;

  x = DBL_MAX;
  Double2Bytes(buf, x);
  if (!++buf[8])
    ++buf[9]; // increment the exponent beyond the maximum
  Bytes2Double(&x2, buf);

  printf("%02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X  %02X %02X -> %+.15E\n",
         buf[0],buf[1],buf[2],buf[3],buf[4],buf[5],buf[6],buf[7],buf[8],buf[9],
         x2);

  if ((error = !isinf(x2)) != 0)
    puts("Bytes2Double(Double2Bytes(DBL_MAX) * 2) != INF");

  puts("");

  return error;
}

#define VALUE_AND_NAME(V) { V, #V }

const struct
{
  double value;
  const char* name;
} testData[] =
{
#ifdef NAN
  VALUE_AND_NAME(NAN),
#endif
  VALUE_AND_NAME(0.0),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(+DBL_MIN),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(-DBL_MIN),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(+1.0),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(-1.0),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(+M_PI),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(-M_PI),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(+DBL_MAX),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(-DBL_MAX),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(+INFINITY),
  VALUE_AND_NAME(-INFINITY),
};

int main(void)
{
  unsigned i;
  int errors = 0;

  for (i = 0; i < sizeof(testData) / sizeof(testData[0]); i++)
    errors += test(testData[i].value, testData[i].name);

  errors += testInf();

  // Test subnormal values. A floating-point exception may be raised.
  errors += test(+DBL_MIN / 2, "+DBL_MIN / 2");
  errors += test(-DBL_MIN / 2, "-DBL_MIN / 2");

  printf("%d error(s)\n", errors);

  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

+NAN 'NAN' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  FF 7F

+0.000000000000000E+00 '0.0' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00

+2.225073858507201E-308 '+DBL_MIN' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 10 00  03 FC

-2.225073858507201E-308 '-DBL_MIN' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 F0 FF  03 FC

+1.000000000000000E+00 '+1.0' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 10 00  01 00

-1.000000000000000E+00 '-1.0' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 F0 FF  01 00

+3.141592653589793E+00 '+M_PI' -> 18 2D 44 54 FB 21 19 00  02 00

-3.141592653589793E+00 '-M_PI' -> E8 D2 BB AB 04 DE E6 FF  02 00

+1.797693134862316E+308 '+DBL_MAX' -> FF FF FF FF FF FF 1F 00  00 04

-1.797693134862316E+308 '-DBL_MAX' -> 01 00 00 00 00 00 E0 FF  00 04

+INF '+INFINITY' -> FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 7F  FF 7F

-INF '-INFINITY' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 80  FF 7F

FF FF FF FF FF FF 1F 00  01 04 -> +INF

+1.112536929253601E-308 '+DBL_MIN / 2' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 10 00  02 FC

-1.112536929253601E-308 '-DBL_MIN / 2' -> 00 00 00 00 00 00 F0 FF  02 FC

0 error(s)
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Great, thanks. I guess my only concern left would be overflows. How would you recommend handling them? Also, is this method exact? –  Jake King Feb 19 '13 at 21:06
    
If floating-point values are base-2, this has to be exact. The only overflows that you can run into are those when either the CPU's format has a wider range of the exponent than in the format or the other way around. You may need to check for this and use special values for infinity or the maximum value if infinity isn't supported. You may have a somewhat similar issue with the number of digits/bits in the mantissa. You will need to truncate or round it if it doesn't fit either the CPU or the file slot. –  Alexey Frunze Feb 19 '13 at 21:31
    
You can optimize the code for IEEE-754 so that if the CPU supports IEEE-754, you do nothing special, no checks. –  Alexey Frunze Feb 19 '13 at 21:32
    
Hmm, alright. Would you mind posting some (pseudo) code? I've tried implementing this, but it's not working quite right in all cases. –  Jake King Feb 19 '13 at 22:21
    
Actually, nevermind, I got it working, the error was in my code. –  Jake King Feb 20 '13 at 3:47
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Depending on the application it could be a good idea to use a plain text data format (a possibility being XML). If you don't want to waste disk space you can compress it.

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%a might be a better choice than %f/%e/%g when writing out floating-point values as text. Not as readable, but should avoid truncation of decimal digits or having too many of them. –  Alexey Frunze Feb 19 '13 at 9:54
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Floating point values use the same byte order as integral values imho. Use an union to overlap them with the respective integral counterpart and use the common hton functions:

float htonf(float x) {
   union foo {
     float f;
     uint32_t i;
   } foo = { .f = x };

   foo.i = htonl(foo.i);
   return foo.f;
}
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There has been platform where ints and floats had different endianness. But we might not care to support those anymore. –  Bo Persson Feb 19 '13 at 18:06
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XML is probably the most portable way to do it.

However, it appears that you already have most of the parser built, but are stuck on the float/double issue. I would suggest writing it out as a string (to whatever precision you desire) and then reading that back in.

Unless all your target platforms use IEEE-754 floats (and doubles), no byte-swapping tricks will work for you.

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Wait... there are platforms nowadays that don't use IEEE 754 floats? –  FUZxxl Feb 19 '13 at 9:46
    
I don't think there is any guarantee about the order of bits in an IEEE-754 float/double in the RAM. It could be anything and you are not supposed to manipulate its contents directly. –  Alexey Frunze Feb 19 '13 at 9:48
    
This is an interesting post about how to ensure that your platform's implementation of double conforms to IEEE-754: stackoverflow.com/a/753018/1384030 –  Rahul Banerjee Feb 19 '13 at 9:49
    
@FUZxxl - One important platform that predates IEEE floating point is IBM mainframes. They still have their own format from the 1960's. But the OP might not care about those. –  Bo Persson Feb 19 '13 at 18:02
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If you guarantee that your implementations always treat serialized floating point representations in a specified format, then you will be fine (IEEE 754 is common).

Yes, architectures may order floating point numbers differently (e.g. in big or little endian). Therefore, you will want to somehow specify the endianness. This could be in the format's specification or variable and recorded in the file's data.

The last major pitfall is that alignment for builtins may vary. How your hardware/processor handles malaligned data is implementation defined. So you may need to swap the data/bytes, then move it to the destination float/double.

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A library like HDF5 or even NetCDF is probably a bit heavyweight for this as High Performance Mark said, unless you also need the other features available in those libraries.

A lighter-weight alternative that only deals with the serialization would be e.g. XDR (see also wikipedia description). Many OS'es supply XDR routines out of the box, if this is not enough free-standing XDR libraries exist as well.

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